Wednesday Reads: We wrote letters…

We wrote the letters that made some GOP Congress members take notice. Mind you…it was none of my congressional assholes who made the difference the other night, but hey…it did the trick.

The fan is still spinning and the shit is still flying towards it, so keep sending those letters to the powers that be. Text the word RESIST to 504-09. Remember, Resistbot is a free service.

Now for the cartoons:

Day 180.1: In which we witness Death By 1,000,000,000,000 Cuts. #TheDailyDon #resist #magaisformorons #trumprussia #thisisnotnormal #dumptrump

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Made in America Week: 07/19/2017 Cartoon by Adam Zyglis

Cartoon by Adam Zyglis - Made in America Week

HE DOESN’T GIVE A S………!: 07/19/2017 Cartoon by Deb Milbrath

Cartoon by Deb Milbrath - HE DOESN'T GIVE A S.........!

MADE IN AMERICA WEEK: 07/18/2017 Cartoon by Deb Milbrath

Cartoon by Deb Milbrath - MADE IN AMERICA WEEK

LIKE FATHER…..: 07/12/2017 Cartoon by Deb Milbrath

Cartoon by Deb Milbrath - LIKE FATHER.....

07/19/2017 Cartoon by David Horsey

Cartoon by David Horsey -

07/19/2017 Cartoon by Nate Beeler

Cartoon by Nate Beeler -

07/18/2017 Cartoon by Nate Beeler

Cartoon by Nate Beeler -

Good Shape Health Care: 07/19/2017 Cartoon by Steve ArtleyCartoon by Steve Artley - Good Shape Health Care

What Gets Called Treason?: 07/19/2017 Cartoon by Jen Sorensen

Cartoon by Jen Sorensen - What Gets Called Treason?

 

 

 

 

This is an open thread….

 

 


Wednesday Reads: A glossary of untranslatable words… Hump Day Cartoons 

 

Hey, a happy go lucky ray of fucking sunshine? That would be a positive thing…right?

 

I wonder if I could find an “untranslatable word” for it in Dr. Lomas’ Glossary of Happiness. (Actually it is called: The Positive Lexicography Project.) And I believe it is something that many of you will find truly fascinating…especially Boston Boomer, who made the study of language a part of her doctoral thesis.

Let’s get down to the article from The New Yorker that introduces us to Dr. Lomas’ Glossary of Happiness | The New Yorker

Last summer, Tim Lomas flew from London to Orlando to attend the fourth annual congress of the International Positive Psychology Association—held, naturally, at Walt Disney World. As Lomas wandered around the event, popping in and out of various sessions, he stumbled upon a presentation by Emilia Lahti, a doctoral student at Aalto University, in Helsinki. Lahti was giving a talk on sisu, a Finnish word for the psychological strength that allows a person to overcome extraordinary challenges. Sisu is similar to what an American might call perseverance, or the trendier concept of grit, but it has no real equivalent in English. It connotes both determination and bravery, a willingness to act even when the reward seems out of reach. Lomas had never heard the word before, and he listened with fascination as Lahti discussed it. “She suggested that this has been really valued and valorized by the Finns, and it was an important part of their culture,” he told me. At the same time, Lomas said, Lahti framed sisu as “a universal human capacity—it just so happened that the Finns had noticed it and coined a word for it.” The conference ended the next day, but Lomas kept thinking about sisu. There must be other expressions like it, he thought—words in foreign languages that described positive traits, feelings, experiences, and states of being that had no direct counterparts in English. Wouldn’t it be fascinating, he wondered, to gather all these in one place?

As the story goes…he went back home to London and began to work on his Lexicography. Lomas is a professor at University of East London…

[…] where he is a lecturer in applied positive psychology, he launched the Positive Lexicography Project, an online glossary of untranslatable words. To assemble the first edition—two hundred and sixteen expressions from forty-nine languages, published in January—he scoured the Internet and asked his friends, colleagues, and students for suggestions. Lomas then used online dictionaries and academic papers to define each word and place it into one of three overarching categories, doing his best to capture its cultural nuances. The first group of words referred to feelings, such as Heimat (German, “deep-rooted fondness towards a place to which one has a strong feeling of belonging”). The second referred to relationships, and included mamihlapinatapei (Yagán, “a look between people that expresses unspoken but mutual desire”), queesting (Dutch, “to allow a lover access to one’s bed for chitchat”), and dadirri (Australian Aboriginal, “a deep, spiritual act of reflective and respectful listening”). Finally, a third cluster of words described aspects of character. Sisu falls in this category, as do fēng yùn(Mandarin Chinese, “personal charm and graceful bearing”) and ilunga(Tshiluba, “being ready to forgive a first time, tolerate a second time, but never a third time”).

Since January, the glossary has grown to nearly four hundred entries from sixty-two languages, and visitors to the Web site have proposed new entries and refined definitions. It is a veritable catalogue of life’s many joys, featuring terms like utepils (Norwegian, “a beer that is enjoyed outside . . . particularly on the first hot day of the year”), mbuki-mvuki (Bantu, “to shed clothes to dance uninhibited”), tarab (Arabic, “musically induced ecstasy or enchantment”), and gigil (Tagalog, “the irresistible urge to pinch/squeeze someone because they are loved or cherished”). In the course of compiling his lexicon, Lomas has noted several interesting patterns. A handful of Northern European languages, for instance, have terms that describe a sort of existential coziness. The words—koselig (Norwegian), mysa (Swedish), hygge (Danish), and gezellig (Dutch)—convey both physical and emotional comfort. “Does that relate to the fact that the climate is colder up there and you would value the sense of being warm and secure and cozy inside?” Lomas asked. “Perhaps you can start to link culture to geography to climate. In contrast, more Southern European cultures have some words about being outside and strolling around and savoring the atmosphere. And those words”—like the French flâner and the Greek volta—“might be more likely to emerge in those cultures.”

On a side note…this reminded me of the story of the Sicilian Vespers. There is a word on the Island of Sicily that is only used on that island. It is the Sicilian word for chickpea. Foreigners had a very difficult time pronouncing it correctly…so difficult that it was the giveaway to tell if you were friend or foe at the time. So, this was the “password” that was used during to Sicilian Vespers. SICILIAN VESPERS – Casa Amaltea

It is said that the Sicilians used a  linguistic stratagem to identify the Frenches camouflaged among the common people, showing them chickpeas ( “ciciri», in Sicilian dialect) and asking them to pronounce the name: those who were betrayed by their French pronunciation (sciscirì) were immediately killed.

But back to the happy words…and the New Yorker article:

Linguists have long debated the links between language, culture, and cognition. The theory of linguistic relativity posits that language itself—the specific tongue that we happen to speak—shapes our thoughts and perceptions. “I think most people would accept that,” Lomas said. “But where there is a debate in linguistics is between stronger and weaker versions of that hypothesis.” Those who believe in linguistic determinism, the strictest version, might argue that a culture that lacks a term for a certain emotion—a particular shade of joy or flavor of love—cannot recognize or experience it at all. Lomas, like many modern linguists, rejects that idea, but believes that language affects thought in more modest ways. Studying a culture’s emotional vocabulary, he said, may provide a window into how its people see the world—“things that they value, or their traditions, or their aesthetic ideals, or their ways of constructing happiness, or the things that they recognize as being important and worth noting.” In this way, the Positive Lexicography Project might help the field of psychology, which is often criticized for focussing too much on Western experiences and ideas, develop a more cross-cultural view of well-being. To that end, Lomas—who is currently using untranslatable words to enumerate, classify, and analyze different types of love—hopes that other psychologists treat his glossary as a jumping-off point for further research. “You could have a paper or even a Ph.D. on most of these concepts,” he said.

This was so “neat” to me…after I read the article I began to think about things, like a bubble diagram popping up in my head.

Nick Anderson cartoon: 07/05/2017 Cartoon by Nick Anderson

Cartoon by Nick Anderson - Nick Anderson cartoon

 

07/04/2017 Cartoon by MStreeter

Cartoon by MStreeter -

BODY SLAM: 07/03/2017 Cartoon by Deb Milbrath

Cartoon by Deb Milbrath - BODY SLAM

 

 

Some bubbles held bits of tRump speeches, and the ridiculous lack of developed words they contain.

 

 

And I wondered if I could find some words in other languages to express the various kinds of emotions that come from certain other current events. Like say…white police killing people of color?

 

 

 

I’ve been saving that old comic panel since the video of the Philando Castile shooting  came out weeks ago.

 

*Another side note here…take a look at this fucking video:

I had originally saved it from a shared post on Facebook, again back when the video of the Castile shooting was released. Of course, when I went back to my saved items on FB…it had been deleted. I guess someone found it offensive?

Oh, I am going off on a tangent. Let me get to the cartoons before I become too much of a fucking capoter ray of sunshine.

 

Your cartoons:

 

 

07/05/2017 Cartoon by Charlie Daniel

Cartoon by Charlie Daniel -

07/05/2017 Cartoon by MStreeter

Cartoon by MStreeter -

Payback: 07/05/2017 Cartoon by Paul Fell

Cartoon by Paul Fell - Payback

Trump Base: 07/04/2017 Cartoon by Paul Fell

Cartoon by Paul Fell - Trump Base

The Spiritualist: 07/04/2017 Cartoon by Paul Fell

Cartoon by Paul Fell - The Spiritualist

Extreme Partisanship and the Great American Divide: 06/28/2017 Cartoon by Angelo Lopez

Cartoon by Angelo Lopez - Extreme Partisanship and the Great American Divide

Wonder Woman and the Fight for Women’s Rights: 06/21/2017 Cartoon by Angelo Lopez

Cartoon by Angelo Lopez - Wonder Woman and the Fight for Women's Rights

Nick Anderson cartoon: 07/02/2017 Cartoon by Nick Anderson

Cartoon by Nick Anderson - Nick Anderson cartoon

Nick Anderson cartoon: 06/30/2017 Cartoon by Nick Anderson

Cartoon by Nick Anderson - Nick Anderson cartoon

JULY 4TH SAUSAGE: 07/04/2017 Cartoon by Deb Milbrath

Cartoon by Deb Milbrath - JULY 4TH SAUSAGE

tRUMP SEXIST TWEETS: 06/30/2017 Cartoon by Deb Milbrath

Cartoon by Deb Milbrath - tRUMP SEXIST TWEETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And remember…many of these cartoons are from the Foreign Press.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an open thread…have at it.


Wednesday Reads: Grabbing Justice by the Pussy …Hump Day Cartoons 


This cartoon by Marian Kamensky  says it all!

See all those people in the riot behind tRump? That is what I see everyday here in Banjoville. 

 At least one reporter spoke up yesterday during the White House Press Conference, in what has become the tRump regime’s latest attempt to grab democracy by the pussy. 

And would you believe in the same conference that thing behind the podium went on to suggest….

….a video by James O’Keefe. 

It really begs this question:

And all I can say is, take a look at one of the responses to that tweet:

What does that mean? Are other news outlets forcing their colleagues to “follow” these outrageous rules being set against the press and by extension the people? Authoritarian rule.  I suggest a new set going forward for the WH press room:


I think the beams of light give it a nice historical feel…Bannon will like that, and so will the crowd of hateful moronic shitheads that don’t have a problem with the fall of our democracy and freedom. 

I realize that I keep harping on this GOP healthcare bill being the tRump Administration’s “final solution” ….but think about it. 

Do you see it?

Tell me if I am not drawing conclusions that are not too far fetched?

Next up… a few quick hits:

 
 

Alright enough.  More cartoons, because:

End this on a funny or die note:

This is an open thread. 

(I hope the format isn’t too bad, I had to do this post on my phone. )


Wednesday Reads: Passing the Death Bill …Hump Day Cartoons 

The assholes are determined to pass the death bill. Meanwhile, Dak is hunkered down amongst torrential rainstorms and tornadoes. 

So this will be a quick post:


06/21 Mike Luckovich: Ken gets real.



This is an open thread. 


Wednesday Reads: Butkus or Buttkiss? Hump Day Cartoons 

Something tells me, that you will get a sense of where the title of this post is coming from…

…by the sample of these first few images and cartoons. 

Oh…shit. I’m getting ahead of myself. 

Let me post a few links, and then get to the cartoons. 

Aw, fuck the links. 

I wasn’t able to bring myself to watch the show yesterday. I think it is difficult for me to watch all this testimony going on, when I know the Senate is working behind those closed doors to kill my mother. 

Here is a cartoon with commentary from Pat Bagley:

Innit the truth. 

I can’t much wrap my head around anything else nowadays. 

Here are the rest of today’s cartoons…I hope you enjoy them. 

You will have to click on the link to see that one by Luckovich in full size. 

And remember as you look at many of these cartoons, they are from the foreign press/political cartoonist. 


And on that note…..This is an open thread. 


Wednesday Reads: tRumpaholics … Hump Day Cartoons 


One of the first things we were taught in my survey of politics course when I was Junior in college, was the importance of pens in Washington D.C. 

LBJ made them a big deal, when signing legislation…he would sign his name…each letter with a different pen, and then give this special pens out to those individuals “worthy” of receiving this particular enhanced acknowledgement. If you were lucky enough to get a pen from Johnson… you were a big deal in Washington. Those pens were like a gift from the king. 

It was just another form of manipulation that LBJ used to get what he wanted through congress. 

The pen give away has been used since then. We always see Presidents signing bills with a series of pens next to the documents. It is what it is. 

Now we come to the pretender in chief. 

This ridiculousness has happened:

This is not a bill. This is a fucking memo. 

It is like a Postit note to Congress. 


Now for the cartoons. *

*Sidenote here. I’ve written this post on Tuesday morning because my mother is meeting with the oncology surgeon on Wednesday…and I knew I would never be able to write the post the same day it was to be published. I’m sure tRump has done something totally embarrassing, so please be sure to update us all in the comments section below. 

I think the hands are drawn too big in this one:



T-minus 2 Days. #TheDailyDon #trumprussia #magaisformorons #thisisnotnormal #resist #comey

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Discuss.

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I’m going to end this post with this report from Pro-Publica. 

This is an open thread. 


Wednesday Reads: COVFEFE? Hump Day Cartoons 

#COVFEFE

The latest in a never-ending list of fuck-ups from Kremlin tRump. 

 

 

What the hell else can be expected?

Franken mocks Trump’s ‘covfefe’ tweet | TheHill

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) on Wednesday mocked President Trump for his late Wednesday tweet that appeared to be unfinished and included the word “covfefe” in an apparent typo.

“A covfefe is a Yiddish term for ‘I got to go to bed now,'” Franken joked during an interview on CNN’s “New Day.”

“I think … he got that from Jared, I guess,” he added, referring to Jared Kushner, the White House senior adviser and Trump’s son-in-law. Kushner is Jewish.

 

“I think this is the least disturbing thing in the history of the Trump administration,” he joked.

“Covfefe” became the No. 1 trend on Twitter across the U.S. early Wednesday morning after Trump sent out what appeared to be an unfinished tweet with a typo.

“Despite the constant negative press covfefe,” Trump tweeted shortly after midnight.

Trump deleted the tweet just before 6 a.m.

And replaced it with this shit:

Trump targets ‘negative press covfefe’ in garbled midnight tweet that becomes worldwide joke – The Washington Post

I really hate this man.

Trump tweets ‘covfefe,’ inspiring a semi-comedic act of Congress – The Washington Post

10 Companies That Have Hilariously Jumped on Trump’s ‘Covfefe’ Gaffe | Alternet

 

Take a look at the links to see responses and tweets to this #covfefe.

Now for the cartoons.

 

 

Body Slam: 05/30/2017 Cartoon by Rob Rogers

Cartoon by Rob Rogers - Body Slam

2017: a disgrace odyssey: 05/31/2017 Cartoon by Steve Artley

Cartoon by Steve Artley - 2017: a disgrace odyssey

Back Channel: 05/31/2017 Cartoon by Rob Rogers

Cartoon by Rob Rogers - Back Channel

05/30/2017 Cartoon by Matt Wuerker

Cartoon by Matt Wuerker -

 

I’m so tired…it is not funny anymore.

Anyway.

This is an open thread….