Wednesday Reads: What now?

Let’s see what happens today…

While you think about that image…read this:

All this taking from Republicans is Bullshit.

Hold all these bastards accountable.

I wish Joe Biden would reconsider holding his inauguration outside…he needs to move it to a safe location. Fir the good of the Country.

What are your thoughts today?


Sunday Reads: Whitelash

This attempted coup is disgusting…here are a few thoughts on the violence this past week.

I think it all stems from the fact that a black man was elected President some years ago….tRump supporters have something in common. They are white supremacist, bigoted assholes.

This thread:

Just waiting for…

This is an open thread.


Sunday Reads: Refolution?

Disgusting.

This next link is an interview with historian/sociologist Jack Goldstone:

It is a lengthy article, but please take time to read the whole thing.

I also suggest looking into the articles listed in the first few paragraphs of the Alternet piece:

…Jack Goldstone, whose 1991 book, “Revolution and Rebellion in the Early Modern World,” revolutionized our understanding of revolutions as products of organizational failure in coping with demographic pressures. 

Goldstone’s book appeared just as America was celebrating “The End of History,” as announced in a then-famous book by Francis Fukuyama. With the end of the Cold War, everything had supposedly been settled. There would be no more revolutions or ideological struggles. Almost 30 years later, no one thinks that anymore, and the demographic factors Goldstone identified — such as the “youth bulges” associated with the Arab Spring — have become commonplace terms in discussing potential revolutions. Goldstone’s model combined measures of demographically-driven social stress from the mass population, the elites and the state to produce a single number, the “political stress indicator,” or psi. State breakdown — and thus revolution — has only occurred when psi rises to dramatically high levels. Unlike earlier theories, Goldstone’s approach explained when revolutions didn’t happen, as well as when they did.

I discovered Goldstone’s work by way of cultural anthropologist Peter Turchin, who refined and expanded his model and applied it to a broader range of societies, including modern industrial states. Four years ago, the month before Donald Trump was elected, I reviewed Turchin’s book, “Ages of Discord: A Structural-Demographic Analysis of American History,” which predicted an approaching period of social and political disintegration, regardless of whether Trump won or lost.

But even in 1991, Goldstone had seen worrying signs in America of the same sorts of problems his book described in England and France in the 17th and 18th centuries, respectively, as well as in China and the Ottoman Empire. Most notable was the problem of “selfish elites” who “preferred to protect their private wealth, even at the expense of a deterioration of state finances, public services, and long-term international strength.”

That’s why Goldstone’s perspective on the problems facing us today seem particularly worth our attention. He and Turchin combined to write an article for Noema magazine in September, “Welcome to the Turbulent Twenties,” and BuzzFeed highlighted their perspective — and specifically, the role of psi — in a late October storyon the possibility of rising political violence in the U.S. But their perspective deserves much more than an occasional mention — it should inform the entire framework in which our discussions take place.

So please give that interview your attention…some responses may give you pause to think, but others are completely on the mark.

The other day:

Here’s a few other items from this week:

Love the message:

Isn’t nature amazing:

Finally, hello Dolly…

I love this woman.

Have a safe day….peace.


Wednesday Reads: Coup… Excuse Me.

The front page of the New York Times for Wednesday…

The New York Times contacted the offices of the top election officials in every state on Monday and Tuesday to ask whether they suspected or had evidence of illegal voting. Officials in 45 states responded directly to The Times. For four of the remaining states, The Times spoke to other statewide officials or found public comments from secretaries of state; none reported any major voting issues.

Statewide officials in Texas did not respond to repeated inquiries. But a spokeswoman for the top elections official in Harris County, the largest county in Texas with a population greater than many states, said that there were only a few minor issues and that “we had a very seamless election.” On Tuesday, the Republican lieutenant governor in Texas, Dan Patrick, announced a $1 million fund to reward reports of voter fraud.

https://twitter.com/nick_anderson_/status/1326392659594911744?s=21

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Visit link in bio for full story.

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Yep

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I still have anxiety:

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Someone sent me this

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Omg

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Someone sent me this and it’s perfect

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Straight up? #NewYorkerCartoons 🖋 Seth Fleishman

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Happy Birthday Sesame Street…

Today is Veterans Day…

As we reflect on those who gave their lives fighting for our rights of democracy, let us think on the current occupant of the White House. tRump and his fellow Republicans, who are attempting to coup the very foundation of government these Veterans have for, are threatening the heart of a democratic government. The people’s voice, their vote.

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November 11 is Veteran's Day in the US and Remembrance Day in commonwealth countries, a memorial day observed since the end of World War I to remember all those who died in service to their country. . In Canada we always wore poppies on Remembrance Day because they are mentioned in the opening lines of the World War I poem "In Flanders Fields," referring to poppies growing among the graves of war victims in Belgium.  . This illustration of a poppy is from the 16th-century Great Hours of Anne of Brittany held at the Bibliothèque nationale de France, MS Lat. 9474. It contains the Latin text of Psalm 101: 12-18, which, interestingly enough, is quite fitting for this day. . Dies mei sicut umbra declinaverunt, et ego sicut foenum arui. Tu autem, Domine, in aeternum permanes, et memoriale tuum in generationem et generationem. Tu exsurgens misereberis Sion, quia tempus miserendi ejus, quia venit tempus: quoniam placuerunt servis tuis lapides ejus, et terrae ejus miserebuntur. Et timebunt gentes nomen tuum, Domine, et omnes reges terrae gloriam tuam: quia aedificavit Dominus Sion, et videbitur in gloria sua. Respexit in orationem humilium. . My days have declined like a shadow, and I have withered like the grass in the field. But you, O Lord, remain forever, and your remembrance endures for generation and generation. You shall rise up and remember Sion, because it is the time for mercy, because the time comes. For its stones have pleased your servants , and they will have pity on the earth. And the people will fear your name, O Lord, and all the kings of the earth your glory, because the Lord has built up Sion, and he shall be seen in His glory. He has considered the prayer of the humble. . #medieval #remembranceday #poppy #psalm #latinlanguage #lingualatina #vulgate #Bible

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He ate rats with rice and survived Japanese war camps, but on Saturday Bal Bahadur Basnet, the last surviving Gurkha prisoner of World War II succumbed to Covid-19 at the age of 99. Basnet was captured by the Japanese during the fall of Singapore, and survived four years in a prisoner of war camp in New Guinea. The British Gurkha defending Burma from Japanese invasion had to flee to Malaya, and were captured as Singapore fell. Those who refused to surrender were executed. The war camps were enduring. “On empty stomachs we were made to work carrying heavy loads, and had to bury the bodies of our friends,” Basnet told Nepalitimes in an interview in December last year. “The dead were the lucky ones, those who were alive worried that there would be no one to bury them after they died,” remembered Basnet. After the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the camps were liberated by Australian troops who took Basnet and others to Darwin from where they were brought to Bombay. Basnet took a train to Gorakhpur, and then to his village in Galkot of Baglung to reunite who had assumed his demise. Before he was infected with Covid-19, he was perfectly fit and never took any medication. He got up every morning at four, took a cold shower and a walk, and did not even need prescription glasses for reading and writing. Read more about Basnet and his lived experiences at the link in bio @nepalitimes #wwii #prisonersofwar #gurkha #nepal #nepalitimes #covid-19 #war #warcamps #hiroshima #nagasaki

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The latest on Covid:

And…let’s not end on a depressing thought:

Congratulations Chris, fanfuckingtastic!

What’s going on in your part of the world?


Sunday Reads: Presto!

Watch me pull a rabbit out of a hat…

Presto:

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VOTE ✔️

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If anyone said half the shit tRump has said…they would not have been elected either.

In other news:

Read through this next one…

I want to vomit:

I’m not crazy about the Lincoln Project, probably because of who is behind it…but this is a real good ad:

What do you think?

Have a good Sunday…