Wednesday Reads: Madman and Rocket Man

Hey, I don’t usually like or retweet David Corn…but those two tweets above made me laugh out loud.

Going straight to cartoons, since I’m writing this outside in a very dark and dangerous state park that is surrounded by national forest.

#GeneralKelly reflects the feelings of most Americans. This was his reaction during Trump's speech at the #UnitedNations this morning.

A post shared by Shannon Fisher (@msshannonfisher) on

Day 243: In which GOP wins are measured by the millions that will lose their insurance. #magaisformorons #healthcareforall #notmypresident #TheDailyDon #dumptrump #dailydrawing

A post shared by The Daily Don (@the.daily.don) on

Please note that many of those cartoons are from the foreign press.

This is an open thread.

https://instagram.com/p/BZPr0G5j7J3/

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Sunday Reads: “May the shadow of the moon fall on a world at peace.”

 

The Orange Turd was at it again…

 

 

*Edited to add the first tweet…

Second tweet…

 

Okay, the heel part is bad…and that is what most people seem to be focusing on, but what pissed me off more was the asshole is still condoning the white supremacist. Right?

I wanted to share this artwork with you, by cecile.dormeau .  When I saw it, I immediately identified with the drawing. Many of you may also see yourselves…I tell myself daily, I don’t give a shit about the horrors around me, talking bout this jackass twit above. I avoid the news as much as possible, for the sake of my sanity…and still, I lie awake at night, unable to sleep because…

 

❓❓❓❓#when #happinesssecret #emothoughts #latenightquestion #overthinking #girl #sketchbook #feltpen #doodle #drawing #artwork #illustrator #illustration #instaart

A post shared by Cécile Dormeau (@cecile.dormeau) on

Here is the image if the Instagram does not load properly:

 

I just love Dormeau…follow her, she is fantastic.

 

Just a few more Tweets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enough of that shit…on to something in historic news:

Wreckage of U.S.S. Indianapolis, Lost for 72 Years, Is Found in the Pacific – The New York Times

In the 72 years since the Indianapolis, a United States Navy cruiser, sank about 12 minutes after being torpedoed by a Japanese submarine, the disaster has inspired controversy, dozens of books, a play and a famous scene in “Jaws.”

But the resting place of the Indianapolis had remained a mystery.

That was until Saturday, when a team led by Paul G. Allen, the billionaire co-founder of Microsoft, announced that it had found unmistakable wreckage of the Indianapolis18,000 feet deep in the Philippine Sea, rekindling memories of the Navy’s worst disaster at sea.

“While our search for the rest of the wreckage will continue, I hope everyone connected to this historic ship will feel some measure of closure at this discovery so long in coming,” Mr. Allen said in a statement on his website.

Mr. Allen’s search expedition released pictures of wreckage on the sea floor, including a telltale piece of hull bearing the number 35 — evidence to the 22 still-living survivors that the ship they frantically escaped in the early hours of July 30, 1945, had finally been found.

The discovery promises to revive interest in the loss of the Indianapolis, the ordeal of the survivors and the controversial court-martial of the ship’s captain, Charles Butler McVay III. Roughly 400 of the 1,196 sailors and Marines onboard died in the initial attack, but those who escaped spent five days floating in shark-infested waters before they were rescued.

Only 316 men were saved after an aviator spotted them by chance.

I associate this wreck with the monologue from the film Jaws…

 

More on the find:

Photos from the wreckage of the Indianapolis, released Saturday by Paul G. Allen. At left, an anchor windlass mechanism; at right, a box that apparently held tools and spare parts and that bears the cruiser’s name. CreditPaul G. Allen

There is a lot more at the link, so please go and read the rest, plus watch the video about the underwater archaeology expedition.

Sad to see this come across my news feed last night:

Dick Gregory, cutting-edge satirist and uncompromising activist, dies at 84 – The Washington Post

The comedian Dick Gregory rose to national prominence in the early 1960s as a black satirist whose audacious style of humor was biting, subversive and topical, mostly centered on current events, politics and above all, racial tensions. His trademark was the searing punchline.

“A Southern liberal?” he once said. “That’s a guy that’ll lynch you from a low tree.” Another: “When I get drunk, I think I’m Polish. One night I got so drunk I moved out of my own neighborhood.” On segregation: “I know the South very well. I spent 20 years there one night.”

Mr. Gregory, 84, died Aug. 19 in Washington. His son, Christian Gregory, announced the death on Mr. Gregory’s official social media accounts. The cause was not reported.

His expert timing and bold humor — often pulled from the day’s headlines — inspired the careers of comedians such as Bill Cosby and Richard Pryor.

Mel Watkins, a journalist and scholar whose books include “On the Real Side: A History of African American Comedy,” said that Mr. Gregory broke the mold among black comedians by employing political satire at a time when audiences expected black performers to do minstrel skits in baggy pants and outsize shoes and use slapstick humor.

“He was the comic that made white America aware of the fact that African American comedians were perfectly capable of satire,” Watkins said. “He was sharp. He was urbane. He smoked a cigarette on stage. He was very calm in demeanor but very outspoken in what he said. … He brought in current political and social issues into his comedy — which was astounding to most white Americans at that time. It was during a time when blacks were considered incapable of doing this.”

Read the rest of that obituary by T. Rees Shapiro, it is a very good article.

More on Dick Gregory:

 

Just a few more links for you, in dump fashion:

‘Las Ramblas cries but it is alive’: Barcelona recovers historic defiance | World news | The Guardian

‘It’s a total mess’: GOP sheriffs reportedly under pressure from Trump to break the law– via Raw Story

White Supremacists Didn’t Show Up In Boston, But These Awesome Signs Did | HuffPost

Sewing Seeds of Hate: Donald Trump’s Unforgivable Disgrace – SPIEGEL ONLINE

Steve Bannon returns to Breitbart: ‘I’ve got my hands back on my weapons’ | US news | The Guardian

 

One last visual feast before we go…there are some marvelous photographs here:

People in the Earliest Photography – These 39 Rare Portrait Pictures That Were Taken From the 1840s ~ vintage everyday

 

Girl wearing a white chemisette, holding long watch on chain, 1845

 

That is only one image for you…please go click on the link to see the others.

One day more:

 

My daughter sent me this tweet that is making the rounds…it is from a newscast in 1979. A reporter is discussing the next solar eclipse, on August 21, 2017…where he hopes to find…a world in which:

“May the shadow of the moon fall on a world at peace.”

 

Don’t know whether to laugh or cry…

I think I will cry.

This is an open thread.

 


Wednesday Reads: Eclipse From Reality…Hump Day Cartoons

Cartoon by MStreeter -

08/09/2017 Cartoon by MStreeter

 

The upcoming total eclipse is big news here in Georgia. I am sure it is making the rounds of top stories in states where folks will observe the complete and total event. In Banjoville they are closing the school:

Solar eclipse 2017: Some schools close on Aug. 21, traffic plans during eclipse | AL.com

Expect heavy traffic along the path of totality for the Aug. 21 complete solar eclipse. (Contributed photo/Department of Transportation)

Areas along the prime viewing path of the Aug. 21 complete solar eclipse are bracing for an influx of visitors and traffic.

In Nashville, the city’s school board has opted to close on the day of the eclipse. According to the Tennessean, more than 400 teachers and 100 bus drivers were scheduled to be off that day, with only a half-day possible for high schoolers and no pre-kindergarten. School officials cited other concerns in deciding to close, including heavy traffic.

Dubbed the “Great American Eclipse,” the main viewing path – or path of totality – for the complete solar eclipse spans from Oregon to South Carolina and includes portions of Tennessee. The Great Smoky Mountain National Park part of the viewing path and has several activities planned on that day.

My daughter works for the Georgia DNR, at Vogel State Park, and they are expecting to close the park because they will have reached full capacity within an hour after the park opens on Aug. 21st.

Concerns over traffic tie ups are growing as the eclipse nears. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, some 200 million people – a little less than 2/3 of the nation’s population – live within a day’s drive of the path of the total eclipse.

The traffic will not be the only effect this eclipse brings…5 surprising effects the total solar eclipse will have besides darkness

Subtle differences may be noticed in areas that only experience a partial solar eclipse, but much bigger changes will take place along the narrow path from Oregon to South Carolina that see a total eclipse of the sun.

1. 360-degree sunrise/sunset

While everyone’s attention will be focused on the sky, looking down can reveal another scene that not many have experienced.

Spectators that look at the horizon during totality will witness the colors of sunrise and sunset around them in every direction.

This 360-degree sunset effect is caused by the light from the sun in areas outside of the path of totality and only lasts as long as the face of the sun is covered by the moon.

2. Stars and planets

As the moon causes day to turn to night, the darkness will reveal the stars in the sky as well as a few planets.

People shouldn’t waste too much time looking for planets and constellations since many of these can be seen at night during different parts of the year. However, the eclipse will make it easy to spot Mercury, a planet that can be tricky to spot due to its close proximity to the sun.

I hope many of you get a chance to see these…Number 4 on the list has a historical record to match…

The celestial alignment will also reveal the sun’s corona, the area of hot gas the surrounds the sun.

A few lucky spectators may even be fortunate enough to see a meteor streak across the sky during the brief period of darkness.

3. Light pollution and city lights

Those watching the total solar eclipse from a city, parking lot or street corner may still see some light during the brief period of totality.

This light will not be from the sun, but rather streetlights that automatically turn on when it gets dark outside.

These automatic lights will not ruin the eclipse, but it may make it more difficult to spot planets and stars in the sky during totality.

4. Temperature change

Not only will an eclipse cause the environment to appear different, but also feel different.

“When sunlight fades at twilight, we always notice how things start to cool down. The same is true for the temporary dimming during a total solar eclipse,” NASA said.

Depending on factors such as the time of year, cloud cover and the length of totality, the air temperature can drop more than 20 degrees F.

During a solar eclipse in 1834, the air temperature in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania reportedly dropped by 28 degrees F.

Astronomers aren’t expecting the temperature to drop quite that much, but people may still feel the temperature drop by around 10 degrees F.

Here is a graph of the temperature change from a total eclipse in Zambia, 2001;Credit/Dr. Mitzi Adams NASA/MSFC:

temp change eclipse

The fifth thing you can see is something called Shadow Snakes. Now this one is a bit more tricky to witness, and does not always occur:

5. Shadow snakes

One of the rare phenomenon to look for during the total solar eclipse is something called shadow bands or shadow snakes.

“Shadow bands are thin, wavy lines of alternating light and dark that can be seen moving and undulating in parallel on plain-colored surfaces immediately before and after a total solar eclipse,” NASA said.

Some people also call these shadow snakes since their wavy motion can look like snakes slithering on the ground.

The article says if you want to see them, it is best to put a piece of white poster board or sheet on the ground and keep a close eye on the lookout for them. There is a video of the Shadow Snakes at the link, so please go and take a look at that…it took me a few minutes to realize what I was watching, until I noticed the faded glimpse of shadows streaking across the white portion of the screen. Very faint and difficult to see. It is almost like looking at those popular 3-d posters from back in the day…you would have to stare into them a long time and then pow…you saw it.

 

I have been actively avoiding the news the past week and a half. First because my aunt and family were in town, then it became a natural defense mechanism. The few times I did come out to see what was going on, stories of nuclear catastrophe caught my attention:

Trump Threatens ‘Fire and Fury’ Against North Korea if It Endangers U.S. – The New York Times

 President Trump threatened on Tuesday to unleash “fire and fury” against North Korea if it endangered the United States, as tensions with the isolated and impoverished nuclear-armed state escalated into perhaps the most serious foreign policy challenge yet of his administration.

In chilling language that evoked the horror of a nuclear exchange, Mr. Trump sought to deter North Korea from any actions that would put Americans at risk. But it was not clear what specifically would cross his line. Administration officials have said that a pre-emptive military strike, while a last resort, is among the options they have made available to the president.

“North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States,” Mr. Trump told reporters at his golf club in Bedminster, N.J., where he is spending much of the month on a working vacation. “They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen.”

What the fuck? It made me welcome this bloody story out of Australia:

 

If you can’t see that video from Time magazine…here’s two articles for ya…

Flesh-Eating Sea Fleas Feast on Teen’s Feet at Australian Beach – Motherboard

It’s not shark jaws you have to be worried about, but microscopic pincers.

If you’re terrified of the ocean because of sharks, you should reconsider—the real thing you need to be afraid of is invisible.

As reported by Australian news outlet The Age, 16-year-old Sam Kanizay decided to cool off after a difficult football practice on Saturday night by taking a dip in the water at the Dendy Street Beach in southeastern Australia. When he came out, his legs were dripping with blood.

Sam Kanizay’s father, Jarrod Kanizay, told Australian news outletnews.com.au that his son didn’t know he was bleeding until he stepped out of the water.

“He went back to his shoes and what he found was blood on his legs. As soon as we wiped them down, they kept bleeding,” he said. “There was a massive pool of blood on the floor [at the hospital].”

But the culprit wasn’t sharks, stingrays, or any of the usual suspects in marine attacks on humans.

Tiny ‘meat-loving’ marine creatures ‘eat’ teenager’s legs at Melbourne beach | Australia news | The Guardian

Experts left stunned by possible sea lice bites after Sam Kanizay emerged from the beach at Brighton with severe bleeding

[…]

University of New South Wales marine invertebrates expert, Alistair Poore, said he had never seen a case like it.

Poore told Guardian Australia the biting must have been caused by a marine invertebrate, most likely sea lice. But he said a large number of sea lice would be needed to cause such extensive bleeding.

“If it is sea lice, then it is a pretty dramatic example of it,” Poore said.

He said often beachgoers mistook stinging from the remnants of jellyfish tentacles with bites. But Poore said the bleeding in this case appeared too severe for that scenario.

[…]

The next night, Kanizay went back to the beach with a pool net full of meat and captured the creatures he said were responsible.

“What is really clear is these little things really love meat,” he said of a video showing the bugs in a tray of water devouring chunks of meat.

Now that is some scary shit.

Forget all about Marabunta…

 

Now for some cartoons.

08/09/2017 Cartoon by Jimmy Margulies

Cartoon by Jimmy Margulies -

 

Clay Bennett editorial cartoon: 08/09/2017 Cartoon by Clay Bennett

Cartoon by Clay Bennett - Clay Bennett editorial cartoon

Cartoonist Gary Varvel: Trump vacation Tweets: 08/09/2017 Cartoon by Gary Varvel

Cartoon by Gary Varvel - Cartoonist Gary Varvel: Trump vacation Tweets

08/09/2017 Cartoon by David Horsey

Cartoon by David Horsey -

08/02/2017 Cartoon by David Horsey

Cartoon by David Horsey -

08/09/2017 Cartoon by Kevin Siers

Cartoon by Kevin Siers -

08/09/2017 Cartoon by Joe Heller

Cartoon by Joe Heller -

08/05/2017 Cartoon by Joel Pett

Cartoon by Joel Pett -

Playing the Country Card: 08/09/2017 Cartoon by Jen Sorensen

Cartoon by Jen Sorensen - Playing the Country Card

Judge Jury and Executioner in the Philippines War on Drugs: 08/09/2017 Cartoon by Angelo Lopez

Cartoon by Angelo Lopez - Judge Jury and Executioner in the Philippines War on Drugs

Working Vacation: 08/09/2017 Cartoon by Adam Zyglis

Cartoon by Adam Zyglis - Working Vacation

This is an open thread….


Wednesday Reads: A glossary of untranslatable words… Hump Day Cartoons 

 

Hey, a happy go lucky ray of fucking sunshine? That would be a positive thing…right?

 

I wonder if I could find an “untranslatable word” for it in Dr. Lomas’ Glossary of Happiness. (Actually it is called: The Positive Lexicography Project.) And I believe it is something that many of you will find truly fascinating…especially Boston Boomer, who made the study of language a part of her doctoral thesis.

Let’s get down to the article from The New Yorker that introduces us to Dr. Lomas’ Glossary of Happiness | The New Yorker

Last summer, Tim Lomas flew from London to Orlando to attend the fourth annual congress of the International Positive Psychology Association—held, naturally, at Walt Disney World. As Lomas wandered around the event, popping in and out of various sessions, he stumbled upon a presentation by Emilia Lahti, a doctoral student at Aalto University, in Helsinki. Lahti was giving a talk on sisu, a Finnish word for the psychological strength that allows a person to overcome extraordinary challenges. Sisu is similar to what an American might call perseverance, or the trendier concept of grit, but it has no real equivalent in English. It connotes both determination and bravery, a willingness to act even when the reward seems out of reach. Lomas had never heard the word before, and he listened with fascination as Lahti discussed it. “She suggested that this has been really valued and valorized by the Finns, and it was an important part of their culture,” he told me. At the same time, Lomas said, Lahti framed sisu as “a universal human capacity—it just so happened that the Finns had noticed it and coined a word for it.” The conference ended the next day, but Lomas kept thinking about sisu. There must be other expressions like it, he thought—words in foreign languages that described positive traits, feelings, experiences, and states of being that had no direct counterparts in English. Wouldn’t it be fascinating, he wondered, to gather all these in one place?

As the story goes…he went back home to London and began to work on his Lexicography. Lomas is a professor at University of East London…

[…] where he is a lecturer in applied positive psychology, he launched the Positive Lexicography Project, an online glossary of untranslatable words. To assemble the first edition—two hundred and sixteen expressions from forty-nine languages, published in January—he scoured the Internet and asked his friends, colleagues, and students for suggestions. Lomas then used online dictionaries and academic papers to define each word and place it into one of three overarching categories, doing his best to capture its cultural nuances. The first group of words referred to feelings, such as Heimat (German, “deep-rooted fondness towards a place to which one has a strong feeling of belonging”). The second referred to relationships, and included mamihlapinatapei (Yagán, “a look between people that expresses unspoken but mutual desire”), queesting (Dutch, “to allow a lover access to one’s bed for chitchat”), and dadirri (Australian Aboriginal, “a deep, spiritual act of reflective and respectful listening”). Finally, a third cluster of words described aspects of character. Sisu falls in this category, as do fēng yùn(Mandarin Chinese, “personal charm and graceful bearing”) and ilunga(Tshiluba, “being ready to forgive a first time, tolerate a second time, but never a third time”).

Since January, the glossary has grown to nearly four hundred entries from sixty-two languages, and visitors to the Web site have proposed new entries and refined definitions. It is a veritable catalogue of life’s many joys, featuring terms like utepils (Norwegian, “a beer that is enjoyed outside . . . particularly on the first hot day of the year”), mbuki-mvuki (Bantu, “to shed clothes to dance uninhibited”), tarab (Arabic, “musically induced ecstasy or enchantment”), and gigil (Tagalog, “the irresistible urge to pinch/squeeze someone because they are loved or cherished”). In the course of compiling his lexicon, Lomas has noted several interesting patterns. A handful of Northern European languages, for instance, have terms that describe a sort of existential coziness. The words—koselig (Norwegian), mysa (Swedish), hygge (Danish), and gezellig (Dutch)—convey both physical and emotional comfort. “Does that relate to the fact that the climate is colder up there and you would value the sense of being warm and secure and cozy inside?” Lomas asked. “Perhaps you can start to link culture to geography to climate. In contrast, more Southern European cultures have some words about being outside and strolling around and savoring the atmosphere. And those words”—like the French flâner and the Greek volta—“might be more likely to emerge in those cultures.”

On a side note…this reminded me of the story of the Sicilian Vespers. There is a word on the Island of Sicily that is only used on that island. It is the Sicilian word for chickpea. Foreigners had a very difficult time pronouncing it correctly…so difficult that it was the giveaway to tell if you were friend or foe at the time. So, this was the “password” that was used during to Sicilian Vespers. SICILIAN VESPERS – Casa Amaltea

It is said that the Sicilians used a  linguistic stratagem to identify the Frenches camouflaged among the common people, showing them chickpeas ( “ciciri», in Sicilian dialect) and asking them to pronounce the name: those who were betrayed by their French pronunciation (sciscirì) were immediately killed.

But back to the happy words…and the New Yorker article:

Linguists have long debated the links between language, culture, and cognition. The theory of linguistic relativity posits that language itself—the specific tongue that we happen to speak—shapes our thoughts and perceptions. “I think most people would accept that,” Lomas said. “But where there is a debate in linguistics is between stronger and weaker versions of that hypothesis.” Those who believe in linguistic determinism, the strictest version, might argue that a culture that lacks a term for a certain emotion—a particular shade of joy or flavor of love—cannot recognize or experience it at all. Lomas, like many modern linguists, rejects that idea, but believes that language affects thought in more modest ways. Studying a culture’s emotional vocabulary, he said, may provide a window into how its people see the world—“things that they value, or their traditions, or their aesthetic ideals, or their ways of constructing happiness, or the things that they recognize as being important and worth noting.” In this way, the Positive Lexicography Project might help the field of psychology, which is often criticized for focussing too much on Western experiences and ideas, develop a more cross-cultural view of well-being. To that end, Lomas—who is currently using untranslatable words to enumerate, classify, and analyze different types of love—hopes that other psychologists treat his glossary as a jumping-off point for further research. “You could have a paper or even a Ph.D. on most of these concepts,” he said.

This was so “neat” to me…after I read the article I began to think about things, like a bubble diagram popping up in my head.

Nick Anderson cartoon: 07/05/2017 Cartoon by Nick Anderson

Cartoon by Nick Anderson - Nick Anderson cartoon

 

07/04/2017 Cartoon by MStreeter

Cartoon by MStreeter -

BODY SLAM: 07/03/2017 Cartoon by Deb Milbrath

Cartoon by Deb Milbrath - BODY SLAM

 

 

Some bubbles held bits of tRump speeches, and the ridiculous lack of developed words they contain.

 

 

And I wondered if I could find some words in other languages to express the various kinds of emotions that come from certain other current events. Like say…white police killing people of color?

 

 

 

I’ve been saving that old comic panel since the video of the Philando Castile shooting  came out weeks ago.

 

*Another side note here…take a look at this fucking video:

I had originally saved it from a shared post on Facebook, again back when the video of the Castile shooting was released. Of course, when I went back to my saved items on FB…it had been deleted. I guess someone found it offensive?

Oh, I am going off on a tangent. Let me get to the cartoons before I become too much of a fucking capoter ray of sunshine.

 

Your cartoons:

 

 

07/05/2017 Cartoon by Charlie Daniel

Cartoon by Charlie Daniel -

07/05/2017 Cartoon by MStreeter

Cartoon by MStreeter -

Payback: 07/05/2017 Cartoon by Paul Fell

Cartoon by Paul Fell - Payback

Trump Base: 07/04/2017 Cartoon by Paul Fell

Cartoon by Paul Fell - Trump Base

The Spiritualist: 07/04/2017 Cartoon by Paul Fell

Cartoon by Paul Fell - The Spiritualist

Extreme Partisanship and the Great American Divide: 06/28/2017 Cartoon by Angelo Lopez

Cartoon by Angelo Lopez - Extreme Partisanship and the Great American Divide

Wonder Woman and the Fight for Women’s Rights: 06/21/2017 Cartoon by Angelo Lopez

Cartoon by Angelo Lopez - Wonder Woman and the Fight for Women's Rights

Nick Anderson cartoon: 07/02/2017 Cartoon by Nick Anderson

Cartoon by Nick Anderson - Nick Anderson cartoon

Nick Anderson cartoon: 06/30/2017 Cartoon by Nick Anderson

Cartoon by Nick Anderson - Nick Anderson cartoon

JULY 4TH SAUSAGE: 07/04/2017 Cartoon by Deb Milbrath

Cartoon by Deb Milbrath - JULY 4TH SAUSAGE

tRUMP SEXIST TWEETS: 06/30/2017 Cartoon by Deb Milbrath

Cartoon by Deb Milbrath - tRUMP SEXIST TWEETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And remember…many of these cartoons are from the Foreign Press.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is an open thread…have at it.


Sunday Reads: Crime and No Punishment 

 

On this Fourth of July weekend, I wanted to bring some crime stories into focus. Various cases that recently have come to pass with no justice or punishment that seemed to spit in the face of the “people.”

I will get to mention this a bit further down in the post, because as usual…tRump has dominated the news cycle again this morning. This time with an absurd Tweet, or should I say twit.

In case you cannot see that tweet (tRump has since deleted it) here is a photo of it:

Donald Trump ‘wrassles’ his way out of MSNBC feud | Political Insider blog

In President Donald Trump’s arena, this is how you shift the American attention away from a feud with MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” crew:

[…]

From the Associated Press on the wrasslin’ video:

It’s not clear who produced the brief video, but it was posted from Trump’s official Twitter account.

 

Trump’s been stepping up verbal attacks on the media — and cable networks particularly. But an adviser thinks “no one would perceive that as a threat. I hope they don’t.”

 

White House homeland security adviser Tom Bossert also tells ABC that he thinks Trump’s “beaten up in a way on cable platforms that he has a right to respond to.”

 

White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said last week Trump “in no way, form or fashion has ever promoted or encouraged violence.””

Well, many around the wires were making statements and comments about the wrestling twit…

CNN had this to say:

 

A few more reactions for you to look at here:

CNN On Trump Post: ‘We Will Keep Doing Our Jobs. He Should Start Doing His’ – Talking Points Memo

CNN on Sunday called President Donald Trump’s tweet of a video of himself attacking a figure whose face was obscured by the CNN logo “juvenile behavior far below the dignity of his office” and suggested Trump “start doing his” job governing instead.

[…]

In its full statement, CNN said Sanders “lied” and accused Trump of encouraging “violence against reporters.”

“Instead of preparing for his overseas trip, his first meeting with Vladimir Putin, dealing with North Korea and working on his health care bill, he is instead involved in juvenile behavior far below the dignity of his office,” CNN said. “We will keep doing our jobs. He should start doing his.”

 

Trump wrestling body-slam tweet ‘encourages violence against reporters’, CNN says | US news | The Guardian

As a prominent conservative senator accused Donald Trump of “trying to weaponise distrust” in his attacks on the media, the president tweeted a video of himself, starring at a pro wrestling event, body-slamming to the floor a man with a CNN logo for a head.

[…]

A director of the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) told the Guardian “charged rhetoric online”, issued by the White House, “undermines the media in the US and emboldens autocratic leaders around the world”.

The president’s tweet was issued on Sunday morning, hours after Trump used a speech honouring veterans in Washington to say: “The fake media tried to stop us from going to the White House. But I’m president, and they’re not.”

The tweet contained doctored video from a Trump appearance on Wrestlemania XXIII in 2007, in which he “body-slammed” – and subsequently shaved bald – Vince McMahon, the WWE promoter and husband of Trump’s Small Business Administration chief, Linda McMahon. Trump is a member of the WWE hall of fame. The video appeared to have been taken from Reddit, where it was reportedly posted by a user named “HanAssholeSolo”.

Please, can anyone stop this OrangeAssholetRump from being president?

As Americablog points out, it is not the first time tRump has called for violence.

Trump encourages violence against CNN reporters – AMERICAblog News

Donald Trump today posted a tweet encouraging and promoting violence against CNN reporters.

This comes on the heels of Trump spokesperson Sarah Huckabee claiming falsely that Trump has never called for violence.

In fact, Trump repeatedly called for violence during the presidential campaign, and was routinely criticized for it.

It also comes on the heels of Trump’s misogynist tweets about “Morning Joe” cohost Mike Brzezinski, that were so mean and sexist it has led many to question Trump’s mental health.

Mashable has a mash up of Trump’s repeated calls for violence:

Go to the link to see the video. But back to the Americablog:

 

And just this morning, Trump joked to his 30 million followers about beating up CNN reporters, when we are already in a climate where reporters are routinely threatened.

A CNN reporter tweeted me this morning, concerned that I was mischaracterizing Trump, and that my story is part of the “outrage machine.” In fact, CNN’s PR dept. responded to Trump’s post by quoting Sarah Huckabee’s lie about Trump never promoting violence. Their clear point: Trump just promoted and encouraged violence against CNN reporters. And that’s exactly what I wrote. I just don’t see a qualitative difference between “calls for” and “encourages or promotes.”

ABC’s Martha Raddatz said this morning that the tweet “seems like a threat.” Raddatz continued, “you don’t think that’s a threat to anyone, you don’t think that’s sending a message ‘do that to the media, do that to CNN’?”

Remember, this comes after recent elections put a GOP dickwad in office, who violently assaulted a Guardian reporter. From the Guardian link above:

In an atmosphere of swirling distrust between journalists and the politicians they cover, “body-slamming” became a loaded term in May when a Republican congressional candidate in Montana slammed Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs to the floor.

Greg Gianforte pleaded guilty to assault and was sentenced to community service. After donating $50,000 to the CPJ, he was sworn in as a member of the US House of Representatives. Jacobs’ glasses, broken in the assault, are now on display at the Newseum in Washington.

In its statement on Sunday, CNN said: “It is a sad day when the president of the United States encourages violence against reporters. Clearly, [deputy White House press secretary] Sarah Huckabee Sanders lied when she said the president had never done so.

[…]

Courtney Radsch, advocacy director for the CPJ, told the Guardian: “Singling out individual journalists and news outlets creates a chilling effect and fosters an environment where further harassment and even physical attacks are seen to be acceptable.

“We are already concerned about physical attacks on reporters and clearly the White House’s charged rhetoric online undermines the media in the US and emboldens autocratic leaders around the world. We already saw that there has been at least one serious attack recently, on Ben Jacobs, a reporter for the Guardian, and this does not create a positive environment for the press online or offline.”

Read more at the Guardian link.

Just a few more reactions to the tRump twit:

Ana Navarro: Trump is going to ‘get somebody killed in the media’ | TheHill

Trump takes down CNN in WWE fight video | TheHill

Donald Trump Is Testing Twitter’s Harassment Policy – The Atlantic

The president’s latest outbursts suggest the social-media platform imposes no editorial standards. But should it?

The rules are simple, okay? No threats of violence. No targeted abuse or harassment. No inciting anybody else to engage in targeted abuse or harassment. No hateful conduct.

Now think about Donald Trump’s the tweeting habits. Is he breaking those rules, which come from Twitter’s terms of service?

  • Violent threats (direct or indirect): You may not make threats of violence or promote violence, including threatening or promoting terrorism.
  • Harassment: You may not incite or engage in the targeted abuse or harassment of others. Some of the factors that we may consider when evaluating abusive behavior include:
    • if a primary purpose of the reported account is to harass or send abusive messages to others;
    • if the reported behavior is one-sided or includes threats;
    • if the reported account is inciting others to harass another account; and
    • if the reported account is sending harassing messages to an account from multiple accounts.
  • Hateful conduct: You may not promote violence against or directly attack or threaten other people on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, religious affiliation, age, disability, or disease. We also do not allow accounts whose primary purpose is inciting harm towards others on the basis of these categories.

Trump has long been criticized for his impulsiveness, but less than six months into his presidency, alarm over his Twitter conduct has hit fever pitch.

[…]

Beginning on June 29, Trump began tweeting repeated insults at Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski, the hosts of the MSNBC talk show, Morning Joe. Trump’s treatment of Brzezinski was particularly strange. In addition to calling her “dumb,” “crazy,” and “low I.Q.” in three separate tweets, he claimed that she and Scarborough traveled to Mar-a-Lago for New Year’s Eve and insisted on seeing Trump while Brzezinski was “bleeding badly from a face-lift.” (Brzezinski and Scarborough published a rebuke in The Washington Post, calling the president’s claim “a lie.”)

In true Trump fashion, the president doubled down, calling Scarborough “crazy” and Brzezinski “dumb as a rock.”

Does that constitute targeted harassment? And given Trump’s huge following—more than 33.1 million Twitter followers on his primary account—does a string of attacks against the same two individuals constitute inciting harassment? “We don’t comment on individual accounts, for privacy and security reasons,” a Twitter spokesperson told me on Saturday. Twitter also declined to tell me whether, when considering the question of a user inciting harassment, it takes into consideration that person’s number of followers or public status—a movie star or politician, for example.

Twitter’s website does offer some clarification on how it assesses abusive behavior. The company says it assesses whether the primary purpose of an account is to harass or send abusive messages; and it looks at whether the reported behavior is “one-sided.”Setting aside Twitter’s notoriously bad track record for actually enforcing its own standards on harassment, the question of one-sidedness poses an interesting problem here.

When one of the people involved in a Twitter fight isn’t just a public official but also the president of the United States, is it fair to consider anyone he’s attacking an equal player in a fight?

Actually, I reported tRump’s last tweet about Mika to twitter..I got this from them saying my report was under review.

What is funny, is that about twenty minutes after I got that notice from Twitter, I received another Twitter notice. My account had been suspended for 24 hours. Connection? I think so.

But back to the Atlantic article:

But Trump’s Twitter conduct also raises a question about what Twitter is, and what it should be. Often, the service is treated as a new kind of public square, a place for the unfiltered exchange of ideas (and, clearly, hurling of insults). Silicon Valley has rarely stepped in to correct the persistent cultural conflation between the actual right to free speech—that is, the constitutionally protected right that says the government cannot make a law that inhibits people’s freedom of expression—and the idea that people should get to say whatever they want wherever they want to without consequence. (Complicating things further, Twitter must answer to its shareholders, and having the president use its service so routinely—and so bombastically—certainly keeps the service relevant.)

In reality, though, Twitter is a media company. Just like CNN and The New York Times are media companies. Except, unlike in a traditional model where publishers and readers are distinct groups, everyone can be both on Twitter. So what’s a company like Twitter to do when one of its users—who is also the president of the United States, by the way—incessantly publishes attacks against individuals? Nothing, apparently. At least nothing yet. The thornier question is: What should it do? Only rarely would any news organization turn down the opportunity to exclusively print or broadcast a message from the president. (U.S. senators and presidential candidates, however, are another story.) Though it’s not like the president doesn’t have plenty of opportunities for his voice to be amplified. He has said he likes Twitter because it’s a direct channel to the American people, but he has his own website where he could be live-streaming or blogging, for instance. He is also a constant subject of media attention; his press conferences—when the White House permits it—are broadcast over cable and network television.

Presidents have historically made good use of new media platforms. Franklin Roosevelt’s fireside chats may seem quaint to us now, but they were a revolutionary experiment with a nascent media platform when they began in the 1930s. But, as with all things Trump-related, looking to norms and historic conventions can only get you so far. Imagine if Roosevelt had used his radio access to relentlessly criticize individual Americans by name. Trump knows that his critics are disgusted by the way he represents the country on Twitter, and he trusts that his supporters delight in their disgust.

Well, I think all that is moot when it comes to bullying and obstructing justice.

I guess I will bring up the crime and punishment in another post…but here is an update on a recent case of road rage:

Man facing murder charges in road-rage slaying of woman, 18 – The Washington Post

A Pennsylvania man was in custody Sunday for what a prosecutor called the “savage” and “senseless” death of a recent high school graduate shot in the head during a road-rage confrontation as the two tried to merge in a single lane.

David Desper, 28, of Trainer, turned himself in accompanied by an attorney early Sunday, and police said he was charged with first- and third-degree murder, possession of an instrument of crime, and reckless endangering in the death of 18-year-old Bianca Roberson in West Goshen Township.

Desper and Roberson, who had just graduated from Bayard Rustin High School in West Chester and was planning to attend Jacksonville University in Florida this fall, were trying to merge into a single lane Wednesday as a two-lane road narrowed, Chester County District Attorney Thomas Hogan said.

“They jockeyed for position, and he wasn’t happy, so he pulled out a gun and shot Bianca in the head, killing her instantly,” he said.

After Roberson was shot, her car veered off the road, struck a tree and was found in a ditch. The shooter fled in a red pickup, driving partly along the shoulder of the highway until exiting the road. Authorities tracked the suspect vehicle on surveillance video and sorted through hundreds of tips from the public, calling on the suspect to turn himself in for his own sake and for the sake of the family.

This is an open thread.

 

 


Wednesday Reads: Grabbing Justice by the Pussy …Hump Day Cartoons 


This cartoon by Marian Kamensky  says it all!

See all those people in the riot behind tRump? That is what I see everyday here in Banjoville. 

 At least one reporter spoke up yesterday during the White House Press Conference, in what has become the tRump regime’s latest attempt to grab democracy by the pussy. 

And would you believe in the same conference that thing behind the podium went on to suggest….

….a video by James O’Keefe. 

It really begs this question:

And all I can say is, take a look at one of the responses to that tweet:

What does that mean? Are other news outlets forcing their colleagues to “follow” these outrageous rules being set against the press and by extension the people? Authoritarian rule.  I suggest a new set going forward for the WH press room:


I think the beams of light give it a nice historical feel…Bannon will like that, and so will the crowd of hateful moronic shitheads that don’t have a problem with the fall of our democracy and freedom. 

I realize that I keep harping on this GOP healthcare bill being the tRump Administration’s “final solution” ….but think about it. 

Do you see it?

Tell me if I am not drawing conclusions that are not too far fetched?

Next up… a few quick hits:

 
 

Alright enough.  More cartoons, because:

End this on a funny or die note:

This is an open thread. 

(I hope the format isn’t too bad, I had to do this post on my phone. )


Wednesday Reads: History Repeating… Hump Day Cartoons 

Think of tRump and his Regime as

Super Horse…

Nothing to see here:

 

 

After the Tuesday Massacre a lot of newsy people were using Nixon as a callback…a reference to history repeating.

History News Network | The Firing of the FBI Director: What Historians Are Saying on Social Media

(Historians are not so quick to make that assessment.)

I actually think this is much worse…

 

 

But I have to say…I love the little hands flipping the bird, yeah…that is tRump alright. Giving us the old “Fuck You America!”

 

In other troubling news:

 

Oh yeah….by the way…

Bottom line:

Here are your cartoons for today:

 

 

 

From last week, this cartoon seems strange now:

 

 

 

I will go ahead and hit publish on this post…because so much is fucking going on:

 

 

 

tRump is also re-tweeting Drudge report….ugh.

 

Y’all know what to do…it is an open thread!