Sunday Reads: A look at Miss Europa…before, during and after WWII.

Miss Europe 1930 (1)

Good Afternoon

Tonight is another Dem Debate…I am hopeful that I will be able to see this one live. But, the chances are unlikely if I can’t find a live feed online.   (Supposedly there is a live feed here: http://www.nbcnews.com/ Coverage starts at 8pm.)

How to Watch the NBC News-YouTube Democratic Debate – NBC News

First Read: Previewing Tonight’s NBC News-YouTube Democratic Debate – NBC News

We will have a live blog up and running.

Let’s get on with the post…I can’t take much of this political stuff now. It gets me worked up, I’d prefer looking at depressing pictures of war-torn nations and reading about the dickheads who are keeping women pilots from WWII out of Arlington National Cemetery.

The pictures you will see are images from the first Miss Europa Beauty Pageant 1930. A time when war was on the horizon, and the countries participating were bringing their best and prettiest young ladies to compete for a prize of Miss Europa. Is it ironic that Miss Switzerland was “withdrawn.”

As you look at these women, remember the beauty and pride they exude for their respective countries because only a short few years later, many of those countries were overtaken…and the image turned horrific.

I will show you some of the women, (not the same women of course…but women from the same countries several years later) the difference in the faces. Granted they are not “beauty queens,” but you can see the beauty of the women underneath.

I also have transposed with these images…pictures of women who show pride…in themselves, for different reasons. Not because of the ideal beauty that they represent in their country…but the pride that comes from their hard work and equality to men during wartime, as they represent their country fighting in the field, and at home. Doing the jobs men left behind, even though they were not paid the same as the men…but dammit they did a better job then the men. (Ya know it too!)

Now the images, from the blog Vintage Everyday.

vintage everyday: Beautiful Vintage Portraits of European Girls from the Miss Europe 1930

Miss Europe 1930 was the second annual Miss Europe competition. Miss Greece won and 19 girls from Europe competed in the pageant. Belgium, Czechoslovakia and Miss Turkey participated for the first time and one candidacy, that of Switzerland, was withdrawn.

Delegates:

  • Austria – Ingeborg von Grinberger
  • Belgium – Jenny Vanparays
  • Bulgaria – Konika Tchobanova
  • Czechoslovakia – Milada Dostálová
  • Denmark – Esther Petersen
  • England – Marjorie Ross
  • France – Yvette Labrousse
  • Germany – Dorit Nitykowski
  • Greece – Aliki Diplarakou
  • Holland – Rie Van der Rest
  • Hungary – Maria Papst
  • Ireland – Vera Curran
  • Italy – Mafalda Morittino
  • Poland – Zofia Batycka
  • Romania – Zoica Dona
  • Russia – Irene Wentzel
  • Spain – Elena Plá Mompó
  • Turkey – Mubedjel Namik
  • Yugoslavia – Stephanie “Caca” Drobujak

Miss Greece won the pageant. I think Miss Russia is absolutely gorgeous. The fashions are wonderful to look at…as I said, this is 1930, so take a look at each woman carefully…because many would be representing countries that no longer would exist (as these women knew them) within the next decade.

The above pictures are from these blog post. I urge you to check out every one of them because I have not used all the photos in the threads below…go to each link and learn and see the photographs.

vintage everyday: Interesting Photos of Women in World War II

vintage everyday: Inside Nazi-Occupied Poland, 1939-1940

vintage everyday: Black & White Photos of Daily Life in Campobasso, Italy in 1944

vintage everyday: Pictures of Collaborator Girls in World War II, Some are Shocking Ones!

vintage everyday: Rare Images of the Battle of the Bulge – WWII

vintage everyday: Ghostly Photos of Kaliningrad Looked Both in World War II and Now

vintage everyday: 50 Breathtaking WWII Colorized Photos Look Like They were Taken Yesterday

 

Vintage Everyday has countless numbers of blog post with shit-tons of images about everything you can ever imagine. Spend some hours over there, you will be going back to this wonderful site again and again.

 

These are the pictures of the women who fought and worked during the war:

vintage everyday: 20 Interesting Black and White Photos of U.S. Women in World War II

vintage everyday: Interesting Photos of Women in World War II

 

The point to all this, is the latest shit fest on the Hill. There is a bitter fight going on about the WASP, Women Airforce Service Pilots…and their rights to buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

 

Women Airforce Service Pilots: History and background on the WASPs

One thousand-one hundred U.S. women served as pilots for the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II. This collection is the official WASP repository, containing digital photographs, letters, oral histories, and descriptions of personal and military records and memorabilia.

In the Beginning:

In 1939, on the day after Germany’s tanks rolled into Warsaw, Poland, pilot Jacqueline Cochran sent a letter to First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt encouraging the use of women pilots in the armed forces. In May 1940, another pilot, Nancy Harkness Love wrote the Ferrying Division of the Armed Air Forces with a similar idea but the Army was not ready to put women in the cockpit of its planes. By September 1942, however, all that was changing.

 

The demand for male combat pilots and warplanes left the Air Transport Command (ATC) with a shortage of experienced pilots to ferry planes from factories to points of embarkation. The leaders of the ATC remembered Nancy Harkness Love’s proposal and hired her to recruit twenty-five of the most qualified women pilots in the country to ferry military aircraft. These outstanding women pilots were called the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron or WAFS.

WASP Facts and Stats
  • WASP served as part of the Army Air Forces from September 1942 to December 1944
  • 30 women invited to join the WAFS
  • 28 WAFS assigned to operational duties
  • 25,000 women applied for WFTD/WASP training
  • 1,830 were accepted
  • 1,074 graduated from the program and were assigned to operational duties
  • 900 WASP and 16 WAFS remained in service at the time of deactivation, December 20, 1944
  • 38 died while in the WASP program
  • 60,000,000 miles were flown
  • WASP earned $150 per month while in training, and $250 per month after graduation
  • They paid for their own uniforms, lodging, and personal travel to and from home

By September 14, 1942, General Henry “Hap” Arnold, Commanding General of the Army Air Forces, also approved a program that would train a large group of women to serve as ferry pilots. The program was placed under the direction of Jacqueline Cochran, and named the Army Air Forces Women’s Flying Training Detatchment (WFTD).

On August 5, 1943, the WAFS and the WFTD were merged and re-designated the Women Airforce Service Pilots or WASP. Cochran was appointed the Director and Love was named WASP Executive with the ATC Ferrying Division.

 

The Atlantic has a good article on this battle that has gone on for years, too many mutthafukken years:

Female World War II Pilots Fight for Spot in Arlington Cemetery – The Atlantic

The World War II pilots fought for their right to be recognized for decades, but have been barred from being buried on the grounds.

Seventy years ago, Women Airforce Service Pilots flew 77 types of airplanes 60 million miles during World War II. Forty years ago, they won formal recognition for their service and were finally granted their honorable discharges. Five years ago, they received the Congressional Gold Medal. But last year,  the Secretary of the Army rescinded their eligibility to be inurned at Arlington National Cemetery. Now, the families of this dwindling group of veterans are fighting to ensure that the United States honors their service.The WASPs flew the heaviest bombers, fastest pursuit planes, and lightest trainers during World War II. They ferried planes across the U.S. and flew Army chaplains from base to base for services on Sunday. They test-flew planes that had been repaired to make certain they were safe for the male cadets who would learn to fly and fight in them. They trained gunners on the ground and in B-17s, towing targets behind their own planes while the men fired live ammunition at them. Of the 1,102 who earned their Silver Wings, 38 died during the war.
The WASPs served their country when it needed them and then fought to be remembered when their nation forgot them—over and over again.

 

The press on both the left and right are picking this up….

This female pilot was denied equal pay during WWII. Now Arlington Cemetery bars her remains. – The Washington Post


Elaine Harmon, a member of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) program during WWII. (Family photo via AP)
Elaine Harmon and her comrades flew Army planes across the country. They helped train pilots on how to operate aircraft and instruments. They towed targets behind them while soldiers below fired live ammunition during training. Harmon was aware that her service could cost her life: For 38 other women, it did.But few people in 1944 wanted Harmon or women like her to be part of the military. Not Harmon’s mother, who believed that Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) “were all just awful, just probably loose women” and was ashamed that her daughter would be one of them. Not civilian male pilots, who felt threatened by the female recruits. And not Congress, which voted down a bill that would have granted the female pilots military status for fiscal and political reasons. As World War II drew to a close, the program was disbanded and largely forgotten. It wasn’t until the Air Force began accepting women for pilot training in 1970 that anyone remembered women had flown for the military previously, and it was not until 1977 that the female pilots were finally granted veteran status.Harmon, who helped campaign for WASPs to get that status, was at the first full veteran’s funeral for a WASP in 2002. It was a world apart from the brief affairs she had attended before, when urns containing a woman’s ashes were unceremoniously placed inside an outdoor structure at Arlington National Cemetery. It made Harmon proud to know that she also would be afforded full military honors when her time came — in April of last year.Which is why Terry Harmon, Elaine’s 69-year-old daughter, was angered when Secretary of the Army John McHugh reversed the old rule and said that ashes of WASPs can no longer be inurned at Arlington Cemetery.

Female World War II pilots barred from Arlington National Cemetery – Washington Times

Congresswoman fights ban on burying female WWII pilots at Arlington

Family Fighting to Allow Female World War II Pilots to Be Laid to Rest in Arlington National Cemetery – ABC News

AP via Fox: Women pilots who served in WWII can’t have ashes laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery | Fox News

The WASPs Are Being Denied Burial At Arlington Cemetery | TexasGOPVote

Meanwhile there is a bill just introduced that could change things:

LI Lawmakers Push Bill To Protect Cradle Of Aviation, Republic Airport « CBS New York

Each day we lose more and more of our World War Two veterans. Now, a movement is underway to preserve, mark and commemmorate unique sights in aviation history.

Long Island’s congressional delegation is backing a bill directing the government to preserve key sites and formally designate parts of Long Island as a unit of the National Parks Service, CBS2’s Jennifer McLogan reported.

“That federal designation would allow them to get funding and preserve the rich history, which is so criticial to the country’s history,” U.S. Rep. Kathleen Rice said.

The bill designates three key sites: Bethpage, which was home to Grumman Aerospace, one of the largest manufacturers of planes during World War II; Republic Airport, formally known as Fairchild Flying Field in East Farmingdale; and Hempstead Plains, the “Cradle of Aviation,” which is home to three iconic airfields: Roosevelt Field, Mitchel Field and Curtiss Field.

(Credit: CBS2)

(Credit: CBS2)

Rice announced the bill at the Cradle Of Aviation Museum in Garden City on Thursday. She was accompanied by Jane Gilman, whose mother — Margaret Weber — served as a Women Airforce Service Pilot, or WASP, during World War Two.

“She was a tow target pilot , she would tow the targets the men would practice live artillery on,” Gilman said.

Garden City is also home to the site where the first U.S. Air Mail flight took off, leaving from the Nassau city bound for nearby Mineola. The short distance between the two villages — just a couple of miles–did not give the pilot enough time to land. The first U.S. Air Mail was literally dropped from this plane onto the roof of the Mineola post office.

The entire Long Island congressional delegation backs the national aviation bill.

Video at that link.

If you are wondering about what is a low target pilot, look to the Atlantic article and especially the WASPs website for more information.

Let’s make this an open thread….I will end it with a fabulous picture of a WASPs in front of one of her ferry planes…

Nancy Batson Crews, among the first women to advocate for WASPS to be recognized as veterans in the early 1970s, is shown with a P-38.

Nancy Batson Crews, among the first women to advocate for WASPS to be recognized as veterans in the early 1970s, is shown with a P-38.


Monday Reads

Good Morning!

grandmother-with-childWell, the women in Game of Thrones may be looking towards a year of kick ass revenge. The women of the United States of Superstitious nonsense still have to deal with mansplaining and not being taken seriously. These two stories just iced my cupcakes this weekend. First, CIA stooge Michael Hayden accused Senator Dianne Feinstein of being “too emotional”.  This is basically the most hackneyed insult a man can throw at a woman in power.

Sen. Diane Feinstein (D-Ca.), chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, may be too “emotional” to have produced a fair report on the CIA’s use of torture, former CIA Director Michael Hayden said Sunday.

Speaking on “Fox News Sunday” about a Senate Intelligence Committee report which criticizes the CIA program as excessive and ineffective at fighting terrorism, Hayden said Feinstein “wanted a report so scathing that it would ensure that an un-American brutal program of detention interrogation would never again be considered or permitted.”

“That motivation for the report may show deep emotional feeling on the part of the senator, but I don’t think it leads you to an objective report,” Hayden said.

Hayden claimed a lack of knowledge about the report itself, but admitted that key information in the hunt for Osama bin Laden from a detainee who was later tortured by the CIA was actually attained before he was ever turned over to the CIA.

Still, Hayden said he believed that “the totality of information, including information from this program” led to finding bin Laden.

This tidbit came directly after my reading this bit of nonsense from a Virginia Republican.article-2222017-035C4964000005DC-367_634x423

A Republican Virginia lawmaker accused an elderly constituent of intellectual laziness after she urged him via email to support the expansion of the state’s Medicaid program, the Loudoun Times-Mirror reported on Tuesday.

“How intellectually lazy are you?” state Thomas Greason (R) wrote Susan Merk as part of a series of emails between the two. “You are the problem. Good luck to you. You can not insult your way to ‘victory.’ If you are not willing to have a civil discussion, please do not write me again. It is a waste of my time.”

Greason’s remarks were the culmination of a contentious correspndence. Merk, a resident at a retirement community in Loudoun County, wrote Greason on March 24 saying it was “imperative” that lawmakers vote to support the state program under the Affordable Care Act. But Merk took issue with Greason’s response, in which he opposed such a move because the law “as already proven to be inefficient, costly, and an utter disaster.”

“This reply is pitiful — it’s nothing but partisan rhetoric, false accusations and invalid excuses,” Merk wrote back. “I will be sure to vote you out the next time you’re up for election.”

Greason’s ensuing response took a more aggressive tone towards Merk.

“Pitiful because I am willing to enter a dialogue with you?” he wrote. “All you liberals are the same. As soon as someone doesn’t agree with you, you shut down communication, call the other side names, take your ball and go home. I understand and am saddened by this approach at the federal level … but your reaction below is THE problem. I did not have to write you back … but I did. I think discussing differences is the only way to solve problems.”

On Monday, Greason told the Times-Mirror that he “must have been having a bad day” when he wrote his latest response to Merk.

I really get tired of the way these politicians treat older women. I hope their wives/mothers/daughters/grandmothers give them a good what for.

images (27)Those of you in larger cities can get your anger on with a new film about Anita Hill.  I will. NEVER. get over that travesty of a hearing.

Against a backdrop of sex, politics, and race, ANITA reveals the intimate story of a woman who spoke truth to power. Directed by Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Freida Mock, the film is both a celebration of Anita Hill’s legacy and a rare glimpse into her private life with friends and family, many of whom were by her side that fateful day 22 years ago. Anita Hill courageously speaks openly and intimately for the first time about her experiences that led her to testify before the Senate and the obstacles she faced in simply telling the truth. She also candidly discusses what happened to her life and work in the 22 years since.

 

93 year old Mickey Rooney has died.

 Rooney had been in ill health for quite some time.

He was one of the most famous child actors in entertainment history.  He play the role of Andy Hardy in 20 films.download (6)

Rooney also teamed up with Judy Garland for “Babes in Arms” which was a huge hit back in 1939.

He was the first teenager ever to be nominated for an Oscar for his leading role in “Strike Up the Band” in 1940.

Rooney and Elizabeth Taylor stared in one of the biggest movies of the 40s — “National Velvet” — which launched Taylor’s career.

That’s about all I can find at the moment, I’m afraid.  I’m going to search for some more headlines as the day wears on.

What’s on your reading and blogging list today?


Mitt Romney: The Rational Republican Candidate?

Robert Bork

Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney has been painted by many as the more “rational” Republican candidate for President, as compared to religious fanatics like Rick Perry, Michele Bachmann, and Rick Santorum, and outright crazy men like Herman Cain and Newt Gingrich. But is Mitt really all that rational and reasonable? Not judging by his choice Robert Bork as co-chair of his “Legal Advisory Committee.”

In an interview with Lloyd Grove of Newsweek and The Daily Beast, Bork said that he thinks women are no longer discriminated against.

How about the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment? Does he still think it shouldn’t apply to women?

“Yeah,” he answers. “I think I feel justified by the fact ever since then, the Equal Protection Clause kept expanding in ways that cannot be justified historically, grammatically, or any other way. Women are a majority of the population now—a majority in university classrooms and a majority in all kinds of contexts. It seems to me silly to say, ‘Gee, they’re discriminated against and we need to do something about it.’ They aren’t discriminated against anymore.

Does Romney agree with that? Here are a couple more examples of Bork’s legal opinions:

I ask Bork if he still disagrees with the high court’s Griswold v. Connecticut ruling that married couples have a constitutional right to the use of contraception?

“Oh, my God, yes!”

And does he still believe that the First Amendment should be limited to political speech and not protect, as he once wrote, “any other form of expression, be it scientific, literary or…pornographic”?

“Oh yes!” he answers enthusiastically. “If you look at what they say, the First Amendment supposedly defines things like child pornography. The Supreme Court said there was a right to it. That’s actually insane.”

In the interview Bork tried to walk back his opinion of the Civil Rights Act:

Bork criticized the legislation on the ground that government coercion of “righteous” behavior is “a principle of unsurpassed ugliness.”

Now he claims that we’ve already made “the transition to a non-discriminatory society,” and he’s happy with how it all turned out.

Back in 1987, Ronald Reagan nominated Bork for the Supreme Court. Fortunately, the nomination failed, and Bork is still angry about it. Grove asked him if he had forgiven Ted Kennedy and Joe Biden kneecapping his nomination:

Even before the confirmation hearings, Ted Kennedy went on the Senate floor to describe “Robert Bork’s America” as “a land in which women would be forced into back-alley abortions, blacks would sit at segregated lunch counters, rogue police could break down citizens’ doors in midnight raids, schoolchildren could not be taught about evolution, writers and artists would be censored at the whim of government,” and so on and so forth.

I ask Bork if he ever forgave the late Kennedy.

“I’m trying to think of how I could conceivably do that,” says Bork, a convert to Catholicism. “We’re supposed to forgive all kinds of behavior. I shouldn’t deny that I’ve forgiven somebody, or I’ll end up being assigned to the outer circles of Hell. But Ted Kennedy is a test case of the limits of forgiveness.

How about Joe Biden, who chaired his Senate hearing?

“Oh, poor Biden,” Bork says with mock sympathy. “Biden, I think, is not a very thoughtful or intelligent man.”

I think we really need some straight answers from Romney. Does he agree with Bork’s interpretations of the Constitution? If not, why did he drag this crazy man out of his well-deserved obscurity and appoint him as a top legal adviser?


Late Night Open Thread: BeBe Fly Girl…Women in Aviation

Good late night!  Here is an open thread for you all. With the recent news about women being pushed back and not forward, I thought we should have a post with some uplifting links about women that have broken through barriers and done some extraordinary things.

In honor of my little girl learning how to fly an ultralight airplane without any assistance, I would like to highlight Women Aviators…

(Isn’t is great to see her flying on her own? I am very proud of my daughter!)

This link has a history timeline listing special dates and descriptions of Women and Flight.  The timeline starts in 1784 through 2001. Women in Aviation – Timeline – Pilots – Flying

1910 – September 2 – Blanche Stuart Scott, without permission or knowledge of Glenn Curtiss, the airplane’s owner and builder, removes a small wood wedge and is able to get the airplane airborne — without any flying lessons — thus becoming the first American woman to pilot an airplane

1910 – October 13 – Bessica Raiche’s flight qualifies her, for some, as the first woman pilot in America — because some discount the flight of Scott as accidental and therefore deny her this credit

1910 – Baroness Raymonde de la Roche becomes the first woman in the world to earn her pilot’s license

1911 – August 11 – Harriet Quimby becomes the first American woman licensed pilot

1911 – September 4 – Harriet Quimby becomes the first woman to fly at night

1912 – April 16 – Harriet Quimby becomes the first woman to pilot her own aircraft across the English Channel

1913 – Alys McKey Bryant is the first woman pilot in Canada

1916 – Ruth Law sets two American records flying from Chicago to New York

1918 – The US postmaster general approves the appointment of Marjorie Stinson as the first female airmail pilot

1919 – Ruth Law becomes the first person to fly air mail in the Phillipines

1921 – Adrienne Bolland is the first woman to fly over the Andes

1921 Bessie Coleman becomes the first African American, male or female, to earn a pilot’s license

1922 – Lillian Gatlin is the first woman to fly across America as a passenger

1928 – June 17 – Amelia Earhart is the first woman to fly across the Atlantic — Lou Gordon and Wilmer Stultz did most of the flying

1929 – August – first Women’s Air Derby is held, and Louise Thaden wins, Gladys O’Donnell takes second place and Amelia Earhart takes third

1929 – Florence Lowe Barnes – Pancho Barnes – becomes the first woman stunt pilot in motion pictures (in “Hell’s Angels”)

1929 Amelia Earhart becomes the first president of the Ninety-Nines, an organization of women pilots.

1930 – May 5-24 – Amy Johnson becomes the first woman to fly solo from England to Australia

1930 Anne Morrow Lindbergh becomes the first woman to earn a glider pilot license

1931 – Ruth Nichols fails in her attempt to fly solo across the Atlantic, but she breaks the world distance record flying from California to Kentucky

1931 – Katherine Cheung becomes the first woman of Chinese ancestry to earn a pilot’s license

1932 – May 20-21 – Amelia Earhart is the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic

The Smithsonian has some more history about American Women in Flight, including some wonderful images.  Flying With America’s Most Famous Female Aviators | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine

Flying With America’s Most Famous Female Aviators
Dozens of talented women preceded Amelia Earhart, and thousands have followed, and each has her own groundbreaking story to tell

Bessie Coleman

This is really a great place to start learning about historic aviatrix like Bessie Coleman (1892–1926)

Turned down by U.S. flight schools because she was black, Coleman went to France, where in 1921 she earned the first International Pilot’s License issued to an African-American woman. Returning to the U.S., where she was annointed “Queen Bess” by aviation enthusiasts, she flew at exhibitions and encouraged blacks of both sexes to take up flying. Before she could raise the money to open a flight school, she was thrown to her death in 1926 as her plane went into a spin while she was rehearsing for an airshow.

Please go to the Smithsonian link for other biographies and pictures of some brave fly girls.

Shorpy also has some cool images of Women in Aviation at this link here.

For more recent information on Women Pilots, check this online magazine out,  Woman Pilot magazine profiling women involved in aviation:

Aviatrix Publishing, Inc. founded Woman Pilot Magazine in 1993 with the goal of profiling the accomplishments of women in all aspects of aviation. Since 1993, we have published hundreds of articles featuring female aviators.

So, do you have any interesting stories or pictures or links you would like to share about amazing women?

Let’s see what you got in the comments below!


Will Anyone Drink the Koolaid this Time?

Ahh…those days of Koolaid and hope…were they really only 2-1/2 years ago?

Here is the video Michelle Manning made for Barack Obama back in February, 2008.

She was so inspired by Barack Obama that she went all out, according to Andy Ostroy at Huffpo.

Back in 2008, a very pregnant Michelle, who’s little brother was fighting in Iraq, protested the war and rallied hard for Obama. She took part in out-of-state get-out-the-vote campaigns. She produced the above video at her own $8,000 expense. And she sent the maximum contribution allowed by law. She was one of those people who were ridiculed as Obamacons. She took the Kool-Aid pitcher right up to her face and guzzled until she was drunk on “Change We Can Believe In.” No doubt about it, Michelle was hard-core.

And then something happened after the election. There was change, alright, but not the kind that Michelle, and millions like her, expected. The president they loved and fought for was letting them down. He hadn’t ended the war, as promised. He escalated the war in Afghanistan. Dropped health care reform’s public option. Didn’t support gay marriage. Took forever to repeal Don’t Ask Don’t Tell. Folded like a $2 lawn chair on repealing the Bush tax cuts for the wealthy. They grew angrier as he seemed to care more about placating Republicans than the die-hard progressives who put him in office. And now they’re upset that he’s gotten the United States embroiled in a third war, in Libya.

Here is what Michelle Manning has to say in 2011 about supporting Obama for a second term as President:

I can’t anymore. I worked too hard for him. I gave too much. I stood out in the freezing rain on Super Tuesday in Union Square holding a sign seven months pregnant begging for votes all day. I knocked on doors in Pennsylvania for two days begging for votes while I was nursing my new newborn baby, taking breaks to pump milk with a portable breast pump and a cooler in my car every three hours. I was a maxed out donor. I made two videos I put up on YouTube at my own production expense. He owes me. He needs to at least keep his promises, and he hasn’t. I haven’t wanted to say anything so as not to betray my party, but I am an American first, and a Democrat second, and keeping my mouth shut is wrong. We need another option in 2012. I’m afraid Mr. Obama is a one term president, and the sooner we recognize that and start working on Plan B, the better off we will be when the time comes. Pretending he’s doing a good job isn’t helping anyone, and I’m afraid the “give him time” grace period is over. It’s reelection time already. I want another option.

Ostroy asks if Hillary might decide to run again, and claims Michelle and others like her would support Clinton this time. I’m afraid it’s too late for that, but I think Obama is going to have to deal with people in the media bringing up the possibility again and again for the next few months.

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