Friday Reads

mardi-gras-decs2

Where Y’at?

Today is one of those perfect New Orleans Winter days!  It’s sunny and 68 degrees F.  It’s brisk enough for a walk in a sweater which is just how I like it.  It’s a great day for checking out the local Mardi Gras decorations prior to the descent of the Ugly Tourist.  It’s always so glittery until the day it all goes down. Then, it’s mostly drunk people and disappointment.

Speaking of drunk people and disappointment, the Iowa caucuses are Monday night which supposedly signals the end of the silly season.  I guess we’ll see about that. I’m still struck by the similarities between the Trump and Sanders campaigns.  Perhaps it’s the nature of so-called “outsider” campaigns.  You know me, I still wonder how a long term Senator and a Trust fund Baby Billionaire can be outsiders.  It just seems that mostly what we’re getting is attacks on the press and disassociation of policies with reality and intersectionality.

Bernie Sanders and WAPO are going back and forth today about the paper’s criticism of his campaign and policy suggestions.  Jonathan Capehart–speaking on Hard Ball last night–said that the voice of the editorial page on this was Chris Cillizza so that’s who probably wrote this response today.    I actually find myself agreeing with him.  Sanders ideas simply are lofty goals. They do not add up when actually put to the pencil which is the kind of thing that I’ve spent my 35 years of adult life having to do for huge corporations, for the Fed Atlanta, and for primary research.  The term used at WAPO was “half-baked”.

Sanders suggests they are too “bold” for the staid WAPO.  Today, WAPO characterizes them as over-promising.

What concerns us is not that Mr. Sanders’s program to tackle these issues is “radical,” as he put it, but that it is not very well thought out. We are far from the only ones, for example, to point out that his health-care plan rests on unbelievable assumptions about how much he could slash health-care costs without affecting the care ordinary Americans receive. “Their savings numbers are — well, politely said — simply wrong,” Emory University health-care expert Kenneth E. Thorpe told Vox. Mr. Thorpe, who is not hostile to single-payer systems of the type Mr. Sanders favors and has even advanced single-payer plans of his own, released an analysis Wednesday finding that Mr. Sanders’s proposal would cost $1 trillion more than the candidate estimated. That is not over a 10-year budget window. That is every year.

Mr. Sanders’s response to concerns over health-care costs was that other countries, such as Canada and France, spend much less than the United States per person on health care. That is true, but the question is how, specifically, he would make the model work here. The countries he praises ration care in ways that federal health programs in the United States, such as Medicare, do not. While there may be a fair case for a single-payer health-care system, Mr. Sanders does not make it. Instead, he promises comprehensive benefits without seriously discussing the inevitable trade-offs. That is not just bold; it is half-baked.

Health-care policy is only one place where Mr. Sanders makes solving the country’s difficult problems seem easy and obvious when reality is messier. He would use higher taxes on Wall Street and the rich to fund vast new programs, such as free college for all, but has no plausible plan for plugging looming deficits as the population ages. His solution to the complex international crises the United States must manage is to hand them off to others — though there is no such cavalry. This might not distinguish him much from other politicians. And that is part of the point: His campaign isn’t so much based on a new vision as on that old tactic known as overpromising.

Mardi Gras decorations on a Bourbon Street balcony, French Quarter, New Orleans, Louisiana USA

Mardi Gras decorations on a Bourbon Street balcony, French Quarter

This is one thing that I’ve really noticed from all the outsider campaigns this year which definitely have some political steam.  Trump promises a wall across our Southern Border paid for by the Mexican Government.  This project would cost tens of billions of dollars. 

“I would build a great wall, and nobody builds walls better than me, believe me, and I’ll build them very inexpensively. I will build a great, great wall on our southern border. And I will have Mexico pay for that wall. Mark my words,” Trump said in his presidential announcement speech.

The jingoistic Rubio and Cruz promise to level ISIS and hundreds and thousands of their innocent victims right along with them.  The rhetoric in this campaign is so over the top that I find myself wondering if so many candidates have overpromised on so many things in one presidential primary before.  It’s really odd because I actually found Jeb Bush’s attempts to bring the Republicans back to reality last night at the debates both sad and heartening.  No one seemed to care much about Jeb’s pronouncements except the few folks with a firm grip on political and scientific reality.  But even then, we continue to get treated to crap like the question-ability of global warming and the call to defund Planned Parenthood which provides so many health care services to so many people that it’s essentially a call for mass slaughter of one’s own citizens.

We continue to see absolute phony promises and little desire on the part of electorate to wake the fuck up. They cannot complain about being sorely disappointed in their elected officials when the elected officials they fall in love with spout absolute crap and nonsense.  The numbers are relevant.  The analysis is by Albert Hunt for Bloomberg so it comes with a be forewarned from me.

The overpromising may be more egregious than ever in the 2016 presidential race. Yet taxes were glossed over in the debate of Republican candidates last week.

Donald Trump says that his tax plan, which has huge reductions in rates and on the amount paid on investment income, focuses on working folks and sticking it to billionaires such as himself. A recentanalysis by the Tax Policy Center showed just the opposite. The Trump plan would cost the Treasury $9.5 trillion over the first decade, and almost $25 trillion over 20 years. The tax cuts would principally benefit the wealthy, almost 40 percent would be for the top 1 percent. The superrich — the top one-tenth of 1 percent — would get an average annual tax cut of $1.3 million.

By comparison, the lowest, or poorest quintile, would get an average tax cut of $130, or 1/1000th of what the wealthiest receive. In percentage terms, the top 1 percent gets a 7 percent cut, the poorest taxpayers a 1 percent reduction.)

The center also analyzed Jeb Bush’s proposal, which would cost less: $6.8 trillion in a decade. The distributional effects would be almost the same, the center found, with upper-income taxpayers receiving much of the benefit. The wealthiest 1 percent would get an average annual tax deduction of $167,325.

The center plans to examine the plans of Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz next week. Although some of the specific proposals are different, the bottom lines are expected to be similar.

Both the Bush and Trump tax plans would “improve incentives to work, save, and invest,” the center stated, while noting that these gains could be partly offset by increases in the national debt.

Also, while both these Republican plans would remove any limits on exemptions for charitable contributions, the Tax Policy Center projected that the steep reduction in rates would reduce the incentive to give to charities.

Conservatives complain that the center is associated with the left-leaning Brookings Institution and the Urban Institute. But the analysts include Republicans, and the team reached out to the campaigns and Republican economists for input. The conservativeTax Foundation, while projecting smaller revenue losses, concurs that the distribution of the cuts heavily tilts to the wealthy.

The center has also said that the liberal Democrat Bernie Sanders significantly exaggerates the revenue that would be brought in by his financial transaction tax. The Vermont senator hasn’t produced a comprehensive tax plan that would pay for the enormous expansions of social programs he proposes: universal health care coverage, free tuition at public institutions and huge infrastructure projects. He advocates further tax increases on the wealthy, but some hikes for the middle class seem inevitable under his plan.

Hillary Clinton, seeking to stem a surge by Sanders in the Democratic nomination race, rushed out a proposal last week that would impose a levy on annual income of more than $5 million. Her spending proposals are more modest than those of Sanders, as is her tax plan. But she has vowed not to increase taxes on anyone making $250,000 or less, a promise that some Democratic economists say is unrealistic.

I suppose no politician ever really lost an election by overpromising, but sometimes you just have to wonder how gullible the American populace really is.  However, these are the same folks that send money to Pat Robertson and think that Rick Warren speaks for an actual and very angry Sky Fairy.

Some of us made it through the Republican Debate last night that had the notable absence of Donald Trump who is perhaps the beacon of over-promising, under-delivering, and covering it up with bravado. 02416428a205cbf7bfe68bad0e35d35d

Here comes Donald Trump, again, and again, and again, touting his prowess at dealmaking. There goes Donald Trump, again, and again, and again, touting his prowess at dealmaking. Gliding into February’s Republican presidential primaries atop a flotilla of polls, Trump has made “deals” the litmus test of his candidacy.

“If I’m president,” he announced at the most recent GOP debate, “there won’t be stupid deals anymore.”

But a well-documented and widely reported trail of bad deals litters Trump’s career as a real estate developer and gambling mogul. (Disclosure: I wrote a book about the Republican candidate,“TrumpNation,” for which he sued me in 2006 because, among other things, it questioned the size of his fortune; the suit was laterdismissed.)

Fueled by a slew of bank loans in the late 1980s, Trump absorbed an airline, a football team, a landmark hotel, a bunch of casinos, a yacht, and other nifty stuff — almost all of which he eventually lost because he couldn’t juggle the debt payments.

He overcame those setbacks, but the man who emerged from that mess wasn’t really a dealmaker anymore. Kept afloat by his wealthy father’s funds and his own gifts for self-promotion, Trump became a reality TV star, golf course developer and human shingle who licensed his name on everything from real estate and vodka to mattresses and underwear.

Through Trump’s rise, fall and rebirth, there was one major real estate project that he tried to keep. The tale of what happened to that property should be of interest to anyone looking for insight into how Trump might perform as president. It was a deal of genuine magnitude and would have put him atop the New York real estate market. And he screwed it up.

I’d like to say that gullibility is symptomatic to the new, disintegrating Republican Party but it’s alive and well in the Sanders campaign too. However, it does look like the Sanders campaign will burn out.  There’s some indication that what will happen in 2016 will be a burn out of the Republican Party itself.  Frankly, I’ve been expecting this ever since the evangelicals stormed the country club back in the 1980s. Donald Trump may be the straw meeting the camel’s back.  Read this interview with Rick Perlstein who has documented modern conservatism for a number of years.

Are you surprised that things seem to be turning up Trump?

I had a very interesting experience this summer. I remember exactly when it was. It was when I was reading an article by [Evan] Osnos in the New Yorker about Trump. He happened to be covering the white nationalist movement, basically neo-Nazis. Coincidentally, it was right when Donald Trump burst onto the scene, and he wrote about how these guys were embracing Trump, as they never had embraced any Republican candidate before. The feeling I got was that this was the first time in a very long time that I’ve read anything about the Republican Party that I couldn’t assimilate into my normal categories. That was a very uncanny and uncomfortable feeling for me. I realized that I had to go back to the drawing board and rethink what was going on. This is something that’s very new, very strange, and very hard to assimilate into what we thought we knew about how the Republican Party worked.

How has it changed your opinion of how the Republican Party works?

Well, of course, the whole of my intellectual project, which I have been working on for a good, solid 15 years now, has been the rise of a conservative infrastructure that has taken over the Republican Party and turned it into a vehicle for conservative policy. If there’s one thing that I thought I knew, it is that basically the ideas and the institutions that were born through the Goldwater movement were a backbone of this conservative takeover of the Republican Party. Donald Trump is perhaps most interesting in his lack of connections to that entire world. The first sign that something very different was happening was when he basically rejected Fox News, threw them over the side, and had no interest in kowtowing to them.

That has been amazing to behold.

By the same token, things I’ve been tracing about conservatism and the conservative takeover of the Republican Party as a backlash against the forces of liberalism—and anger at perceived liberal elites and all of the racial entailments of that—are part of the Trump phenomenon, too. So, how these things mix together and how they produce the phenomenon we’re seeing now is something that’s been very humbling for me.

Do you think the things that Trump has been exploiting have always been exploitable, or do you think that some conditions, either in the Republican Party or the country at large, have changed and made Trump possible?

That’s a good question. I think that people who base their political appeal on stirring up the latent anger of, let’s just say, for shorthand’s sake, what Richard Nixon called the “silent majority,” know that they’re riding a tiger. Whether it was Richard Nixon very explicitly, when he was charting his political comeback after the 1960 loss, rejecting the John Birch Society. Or whether it was Ronald Reagan in 1978 refusing to align himself with something called the Briggs Initiative in California, which was basically an initiative to ban gay people from teaching, at a time when gays were being attacked in the streets. Or whether it was George W. Bush saying that Islam is a religion of peace and going to a mosque the week after 9/11. These Republican leaders have always resisted the urge to go full demagogue. I think they understood that if they did so, it would have very scary consequences. There was always this boundary of responsibility, the kind of thing enforced by William F. Buckley when he was alive.

I think that Donald Trump is the first front-runner in the Republican Party to throw that kind of caution to the wind. As demagogic as so much of the conservative movement has been in the United States, and full of outrageous examples of demagoguery, there’s always been this kind of saving remnant, or fear of stirring up the full measure of anger that exists.

Mardi-Gras-bead-tree-deedeeflower-22452394-500-375Again, I will say that a good number of both Trump and Sanders supporters are angry white men and they love all these promises because the lack of talk on intersectionality is taken as a return to their predominance in one way or another.  The separating feature appears to be age.  They seem to bask in white male privilege and view the idea of any one else achieving equality with them as a lose on their score cards.   Melissa at Shakesville has some very astute analysis here about Sanders which explains to me why so many young, white, scared males are attracted to Sanders’ vision.

I will never forget having to see a female president start her campaign event by addressing misogyny, intended as a “compliment.”

I will never not understand that Hillary Clinton is not allowed to forget her womanhood for a moment, even if she wanted to, while she is running for president, and what it means that Bernie Sanders’ primary line of attack against her depends on treating her womanhood like it doesn’t matter.

This, of course, is indicative of Sanders’ entire campaign, where gender, or any identity, isn’t what’s important; the issues are. And no wonder: If Sanders actually embraced an intersectional approach that detailed how marginalized people are disproportionately and differently affected by economic, social, and political injustice, it might become abundantly clear how absurd it is to continually suggest that a woman is representative of the establishment.

And oh how absurd it is, truly, when one takes a long gaze at the uninterrogated misogyny that is being lobbed at Clinton, even by ostensible progressives. (That link shared with Erica’s permission.) If gender really didn’t matter, then it wouldn’t matter to Clinton’s opponents, either.

But it does. Clinton’s womanhood matters. Her clothes matter. Her hair matters. Her voice matters. Her tone matters. Her likeability matters. Her emotions matter. Her “murderous cackle” matters.

The thing about “the establishment” is that it’s impervious to such demeanment.

It sets the rules by which Hillary Clinton is judged ever wanting, by virtue of metrics that are inextricably tied to womanhood.

There is a person in this Democratic primary who can be visibly angry, who can shout, who can use any tone and show any emotion, who can show up to campaign events looking like they just rolled out of bed after a bender. Who can coast by on the double-standard defined and enforced by the establishment.

It is not Hillary Clinton.

All the things I am admonished to admire about Bernie Sanders, that he is passionate, that he is unpolished, that he is impolitic, that he doesn’t give a fuck, are things that the very establishment he allegedly wants to dismantle do not afford his female competitor.

i-QXR9Mdx-MHow is this different from all the things that Trump has said about Megyn Kelly which increases his viability in the eyes of so many pundits and voters alike?  Yes.  Just like we’ve had to defend Sarah Palin and Michelle Bachmann from slut slamming and misogyny, we have to defend Megyn Kelly.  Republican Rednecks and Democratic DudeBros both swim in the same shark tank and spout the same sexist nonsense.

Early Thursday morning, Trump followed up with a new line of attack,retweeting a pair of images from a photoshoot Kelly did for GQ magazine and the message: “And this is the bimbo that’s asking presidential questions?” The images were captioned: “Criticizes Trump for objectifying women. Poses like this in GQ magazine.”

We also were treated, last night, to Rand Paul mansplaining that Hillary Clinton can’t be a feminist icon because Monica Lewinsky and because Bill’s still her husband.

So, tell me, how are these campaigns essentially any different when you’ve got most of them promising things that they can never deliver and acting like there’s no such thing as sexism or institutional racism outside of making the right minimal  gestures and that every one will benefit the same from their beneficence? How many people are going to get fooled by this again?  And which campaigns acknowledge that the US is in fact full of a women, children, and men of many creeds and colors?  Oddly enough, it’s the two big “establishment” candidates that speak to inclusion and to varying degrees, intersectionality.

Frankly, I have one thing to say.  This country does not need any more Great White Fathers in Washington. The majority of us have been the White Man’s burden and chattel for too long.  Campaigns and politicians like these two need to be stopped now.  They’re establishment wolves in anti-establishment sheep’s clothing.

What’s on your reading and blogging list today? 

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36 Comments on “Friday Reads”

  1. jane says:

    re: Hillary’s womanhood. I think the idea of a woman president scares the heck out of a lot of men regardless of party. It is similar to the reaction that a black president from all the racists of the country, all of a sudden we have screaming from supposedly intelligent people. Expect something similar from people if a woman gets elected POTUS.

  2. William says:

    A very interesting essay, Dakinikat, and some very good points. I do think that the virulent dislike of Hillary from some quarters is not just a function of misogyny, but an overlap of various unpleasant social factors. First, we know that there are quite a few women who have this strange aversion to Hillary; those include the obsessive Maureen Dowd; Susan Sarandon (a Hillary hater back in ’08 as well), Sally Quinn, Andrea Mitchell, Cokie Roberts, the woman at the NYT editorial page who was spearheading all the falsehoods in that paper which finally had to be somewhat retracted. And then there are the “disdainers” like Rachel Maddow, Gail Sheehy; the women on the so-called Lett who “just don’t feel excited about Hillary.” and are anxious to try to speak for what they see as their cohort.

    I think that Hillary represents different things to different people, in a strange and scapegoating way. Some just hate the Clintons; some want her to be more feminist; some less so; some are jealous or spiteful; or think that they come from an aristocracy that she does not. So it is protean and complex, and weirdly psychological in some cases. Fortunately, Hillary has a great deal of support from the mainstream.

    As for the Republicans, the evangelical wing, so strong in the South and some of the Midwest,, is proudly and fiercely anti-intellectual, anti-ideas. And there is a strong undercurrent of anti-Black, anti-semitic hate among the Republican voters. This has run through the country for many years, it was just that the South used to vote Democratic as an artifact of Reconstruction. Often these people are far from economically or even socially privileged; they are angry and resentful people who hate what they think of as liberal diversity, and the government giving things to people. As Thomas Frank wrote in his book, they seem to be eager to vote against their own economic interests, just because they hate Hollywood and liberal thinking so much. I do agree that Trump is appealing to the worst aspects, and there is certainly palpable misogyny in his campaign, as well as other repulsive ideas which hearken back to the Know-Nothing Party.The rest of them, like Carson and Huckabee, are more concerned with turning America into a theocracy, perhaps something that the early religious fanatics here envisioned.

    • janicen says:

      You know I always love your commentary, but I have to disagree with your assessment that it’s not just the misogyny. 99% of it is. I’ll give you maybe 1 percent of anti-Clinton sentiment but most of that is coming from the One Percent who would attack any viable Democrat.

      The fact that Hillary has been criticized by women is not evidence that misogyny is not the reason. The misogyny comes from conditioning by the patriarchy and we are all, even those of us who consider ourselves passionate feminists, affected by it. It takes decades of reading and analyzing and studying our culture to shed the conditioning and you can’t do it on your own. That’s why blogs like this one are helpful because we keep each other on our feminist toes.

      I’m reminded of a study I read about, one of those “Who would you trust more?” studies where people are presented with a photo of a white person and one of a black person. As expected, the majority of white people chose the photo of the white person but what was so interesting is that a large number (almost half?) of black people chose the photo of the white person. The study concluded that mistrust of black people is so ingrained in our culture and constantly reinforced by the media, movies, television, and advertising that black people were being successfully conditioned not to trust black people. Same is true with women. The conditioning that women are inferior is everywhere and we (women) are rewarded by the patriarchy for turning on our own. It’s the path of least resistance and some find that appealing.

      • William says:

        I certainly respect your views on this, Janice, as well as the other women who agree with you. I am not a woman, of course. But I do believe that if, say, the female governor of…South Carolina?, the one who gave the response to the State of the Union speech, were running as the Republican candidate for President, she would not face the kind of relentless criticism which Hillary faces. Sarah Palin got lots of heat, but not really for her gender. I do think that with Hillary it is a complex constellation of biases and jealousies, as well as of course some misogynistic aspects.

        Let us fervently hope that we do not test it out, but I think that if a conservative woman candidate were nominated in the near future, she would win. The opposition to Hillary from some quarters, also has to do with her progressivism, her marriage and partnership with Bill Clinton, who was viciously hated by the Right, as well as scorned by some brahmin Democrats; and her superior intelligence. Many Americans hate very bright people; they mocked Adlai Stevenson as an egghead. Hillary is calm, poised, and supremely knowlegeable, and that is also bothersome to some.

        • janicen says:

          No, it’s because she’s a woman. Suffragists were violently attacked and every single one of us, whenever have we tried to achieve some level of equality have experienced reactions. Some of them violent, some of them loud, some of them physical, some of them verbal, and some of them mental but we know it, William because we have lived it. The Republicans will never nominate a woman until Hillary is elected president. That’s how powerful it will be for all women. She must break through, for all of us.

      • bostonboomer says:

        Sarah Palin got plenty of misogyny, including from Obama. St. Elizabeth Warren had to deal with a lot of sexism when she ran for the Senate in MA and she would again if she ran for president. I agree with Janicen. The hatred of Hillary is 99% sexism and woman hatred–much of it likely unconscious.

    • jane says:

      I believe the non-sexist part of the Hillary hating is due to the propaganda campaign put on by the republicans during the Clinton administration. So many people heard the accusations and thought it must have some basis, but I thought the republicans were afraid of her even then. Otherwise, why would you have this story of her killing Vincent Foster and having secret service men move his body across DC to hide her involvement. such a ludicrous story was believed by some.

  3. roofingbird says:

    I think this is a page for your upcoming publication, Dak.

  4. roofingbird says:

    And Michelle Obama’s “wolfishness”, etc.

  5. dakinikat says:

    Slight twist to what I was saying from Charles Pierce: http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/politics/news/a41608/bernie-sanders-washington-post-response/

    I think the difference is that we expect Republicans to your plans that are a$$pirational only because nothing they ever suggest works. Democrat are the ones that usually more grounded. Sanders is about as grounded as a rogue Macy’s balloon.

  6. bostonboomer says:

    I hope this won’t hurt Hillary in Iowa.

    The State Department: Hillary Clinton’s email correspondence contained ‘top secret’ material

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2016/01/29/the-state-department-concludes-there-is-top-secret-material-in-hillary-clintons-email-correspondence-from-her-time-as-secretary-of-state/

    • William says:

      The headline value of this is far more than the actual reality of it. She used a private server as she was allowed to do. The server was never hacked, although apparently some government servers have been hacked during that period. The classification system has changed since she was in the Cabinet. Nothing whatsoever was compromised. The idea that she has to keep releasing all her emails of 3-7 years ago, is ridiculous in itself. But of course there is thar headline value to her opponents on the Right.

      • Sweet Sue says:

        Last night, ABC News had a blaring headline about this that read “Clinton Bombshell.”
        Well, it was the same bombshell that they hawked a month ago and the month before that and the month before that. Emails that were previously non classified are suddenly, now, classified. How convenient.
        It appears that convicted felon, Tom Delay, has an in with some assholes in the FBI and he’s been wormtounge whispering to any Media type who’ll listen that soon Hillary will be sporting an orange jumpsuit and handcuffs.
        An awful lot of highly placed people really don’t want her to be President.
        I just hope that I, and all of you, can make it through primary season without stroking out.*
        *My blood pressure is through the roof.

    • NW Luna says:

      …whether to retroactively classify emails that were not marked as sensitive when they were sent …

      Much ado about nothing, if people read beyond the headline. And why the hell doesn’t the media blather on about Colin Powell using a private email account?

      • Sweet Sue says:

        And we all know that if the “stupid bitch” would just quit, the email “scandal” would magically disappear.

  7. NW Luna says:

    Interesting that the Berniebros’ harassment of Hillary supporters is getting media attention when the equivalent problem was ignored in 2008. A slight improvement.

    • bostonboomer says:

      No, but I live in a quiet little suburb. I heard something about it though. Thanks for the link.

  8. Fannie says:

    What it is! So much that has been said here is about how we all see Hillary, and how we see all the strains that are put on women throughout our history.

    I’d love to be sitting in a room looking into your eyes, listening to you speak of your experiences, and how things can be changed by electing a woman. Of course, should that happen tomorrow you might ask me who punched me in the nose. As I was looking for some old books, a picture frame fell on my face, and cut my nose. Trying to really get across my thoughts on social media, has been difficult for me.

    I just know that I have a strong investment, and I mean a long term investment in electing Hillary. I know that men and women listen to me, and say I’m too emotional. Isn’t that part of the act, is to say women are tooooooooo emotional. Like a lot of us, we have devoted our hearts, our souls, damn near our lives in the struggle for women getting a chance at the balancing powers of this country. Yes, I don’t want to hear about Bernie, there is no more looking at him, because he pulled the biggest dumb shit evah by comparing her to Cheney.

    Dak I am in agreement that it’s been the white guy who has been the established mechanism that has run all aspects of women’s lives, and they still refuse to see us, Hillary, as accomplished, or historic. Though he doesn’t call her names, I get the feeling he’s like wanting to treat her like a vagina. He’s painted her like a Wall Street She Devil, and then wonders why women his age doesn’t even want to turn the page to goals, what reality is like with another white man in power.

    Yes we are reminded of Obama’s campaign, and from the beginning how he expressed his feeling that the “claws were coming out”, and Michele Obama saying that Hillary couldn’t keep her house together, so how in the hell was she going to keep it together in the White House. Talk about a fire, we cried, cried, and finally out of protest voted against Obama. Even though Hillary told us not to do it. We got suckered in, and I tell everybody don’t do it. The only angle to talk is to vote Democrat.

    Luv, Luv, Luv you dancers, you have helped me from going crazy. “I’ve lived it”, and that has made me worried all my life, but now I am too old for this shit, watching the republicans last night lie, and lie, and no rules or laws to stop them, and let them get away with it, about done me in. They don’t have to talk about policy, they go on and on with their you said this, and no I never said that, and oh, shit……..I just want to rip their pants off and put a damn diaper on them.

    I’ll help Hillary anyway I can, I’m investing in her, because she’s investing in our grandchildren.

  9. Fannie says:

    Here’s what a mother said on Melissa Harris Perry’s show this morning: My daughter was up at 8:00, and she voted for Obama 2008, and she said this man Bernie has been talking about banks and capitalism, and told her mother “being a woman is not enough right now”……………

    In other words Bernie has convinced young women to bow out of supporting Hillary, and that they would be better off with him. Like he’s different than anything they have ever seen, and I shudder, as to why they refuse to see that Hillary is about families, the rich, the poor, the middle class, the disabled, those of color, teenagers, and the elderly, yet, they want to support the straight arrow, and not the one who pretty much wants to build on what President Obama has done. Push Hillary back, and push Bernie up front, is that what that is suppose to mean?

    Is this really the issue “being a woman is not enough right now”…………….Mercy, the most important choice of their lives, is to vote for a woman, strengthen the balance of power, and back women up, it’s common sense this time, right now.

    • NW Luna says:

      I can’t understand it either, Fannie, how they cannot see that what this man is saying is keeping women down again. There’s no comparison between Sanders’ experience (limited) and Hillary’s (extensive).

  10. Fannie says:

    Bye the bye, it was Maria Hinojosa, whose daughter said “being a woman is not enough right now.”…………..

    The woman that I supported most of my adult life is the woman who stood with Cesar Chavez, until he died in 1993. Delores Huerta, and she proudly endorsed Hillary Clinton: I can’t wait to see these two ladies on the stage, or walking together on the streets of this country. That is power, years of power.

    http://www.presidency-ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=92674