and the Band Played On

31tPpCW2qRL._SL500_AA250_So the so-called conservatives are having their so-called freedom event with so-called commentators and news anchors from so-called news stations. It’s all a side show to the real problems of the country. It’s easy to misplace anger in an environment where misinformants rule the airwaves.

So, let me show you where the real theft is happening, in case you may have missed it.

First, the FDIC released yet another move towards creating a financial banking cartel. Another one bites the dust.

Corus Bank, National Association, Chicago, Illinois, was closed today by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, which appointed the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) as receiver. To protect the depositors, the FDIC entered into a purchase and assumption agreement with MB Financial Bank, National Association, Chicago, Illinois, to assume all of the deposits of Corus Bank, N.A.

But you know there’s really nothing to see here at the NY Times: A Year After a Cataclysm, Little Change on Wall St. Much more important to focus on creeping socialism and taking our government back from imagined enemies.

One year after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the surprise is not how much has changed in the financial industry, but how little.

Backstopped by huge federal guarantees, the biggest banks have restructured only around the edges. Employment in the industry has fallen just 8 percent since last September. Only a handful of big hedge funds have closed. Pay is already returning to precrash levels, topped by the 30,000 employees of Goldman Sachs, who are on track to earn an average of $700,000 this year. Nor are major pay cuts likely, according to a report last week from J.P. Morgan Securities. Executives at most big banks have kept their jobs. Financial stocks have soared since their winter lows.

No nothing to see here. Wait, a minute. Maybe we should listen to people with some expertise instead of Glenn Beck or Rush Limbaugh who couldn’t even get one college degree or a freshman’s worth of credits between them . Maybe we shouldn’t focus on sycophants like Chris Matthews or Keith Olbermann who just want to hear themselves talk and hump each others legs until they tingle.

In fact, though, regulators and lawmakers have spent most of the last year trying to save the financial industry, rather than transform it. In the short run, their efforts have succeeded. Citigroup and other wounded banks have avoided bankruptcy, and the economy has sidestepped a depression. But the same investors and economists who predicted, and in some cases profited from, the collapse last fall say the rescue has come at an extraordinary cost. They warn that if the industry’s systemic risks are not addressed, they could cause an even bigger crisis — in years, not decades. Next time, they say, the credit of the United States government may be at risk.

Yup, what have we been talking about here for month after month after month, while we get named called every imaginable insult from one end of the political spectrum to another. I must defy definition if one day I can be called a racist republican ratfucker then be called a greenie and a leftie the next.

Oh, meanwhile …

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Inquiring Minds also Blog

high-noon

The two regulators who don’t appear captured by the regulated are both women.  FDIC’s Sheila Bair has been quietly closely down the bankrupt quite efficiently and ensuring every one knows that the FDIC will stand by its insurance commitments.  Elizabeth  Warren who is the head of the group watching the TARP funds  is calling this week for the ousting of derelict bank executives.  This includes Citibank and AIG.   Is this the beginning of High Noon on Wall Street?

Warren also believes there are “dangers inherent” in the approach taken by treasury secretary Tim Geithner, who she says has offered “open-ended subsidies” to some of the world’s biggest financial institutions without adequately weighing potential pitfalls. “We want to ensure that the treasury gives the public an alternative approach,” she said, adding that she was worried that banks would not recover while they were being fed subsidies. “When are they going to say, enough?” she said.

She said she did not want to be too hard on Geithner but that he must address the issues in the report. “The very notion that anyone would infuse money into a financially troubled entity without demanding changes in management is preposterous.”

Meanwhile, many finance and economics bloggers have looked into legal issues surrounding the Obama/Geithner bailout and believe laws are being broken.  Both Boston Boomer and Sam point to this at George Washington’s Blog.

Geithner’s statements that he didn’t have the power to close down the big banks is false. Moreover, Geithner and Paulson actually broke the law which requires the government to close down insolvent banks, no matter how big.

The Prompt Corrective Action Law (PCA) – 12 U.S.C. § 1831o – not only authorizes the government to seize insolvent banks, it mandates it.

An earlier post  here contains the interview with  William K. Black, a senior regulator during the S&L crisis and Associate Professor of Economics and Law at the University of Missouri and Bill Moyers.  Even more interesting news has appeared recently as it looks like regulators aren’t the only ones dropping the ball.  Is this a repeat of the Aurthur Anderson/Enron failure of Public Accounting?

New Century, one of the country’s top subprime lenders, went bankrupt shortly after disclosing that its financial statements were misstated. Its creditors are now suing KPMG, New Century’s auditor, for at least $1 billion in damages. In the years leading up to the financial crisis, some of the nation’s largest accounting firms failed to properly examine the reserves that banks and other lenders set aside to cover losses, records from a federal oversight board show.

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