September 11 Photo Connections

Photo: CUNY, The 911 Digital Archive. Please click for more image info.

My daughter Bebe wanted her dad to come to her history class this morning and talk about his experience as a survivor on September 11, 2001. He did not want to do it…it still hurts.

Getting Dan to talk about that day is very difficult. Sometimes he will mention a few descriptions of images or thoughts or smells, but it is very rare. His nightmares have subsided, at least ones that are so real too him they wake me up.

Last year I wrote about my family’s personal experiences, and my own thoughts about that day…you can take a look at that post here…Sunday: September 11th…2011 « Sky Dancing

So for this, the eleventh anniversary of September 11, 2001, I thought it would be good to find some photos of what that day was like for my husband and so many other survivors who still remember that war zone as vividly as if it happened yesterday.

First, I want you to click on this link to a Flickr Slide Show.  These are images of Liberty St., Maiden Lane, Battery Park and the Financial District Downtown NYC on September 11, 2001 and the days that follow. (If that slide show does not load, click here for the photo stream.)

I also came across this blog, which has some fascinating pictures and thoughts…13 Days: The World Trade Center, Day One

Day One: September 11

9:02 am 11:02 am

Woke up to sirens and radio reports of an incident at the World Trade Center. I grabbed my camera and was out on the street by 9:00.

This blog discusses the first 13 days and the first 13 weeks and the first 13 months after the attack on World Trade.

Fall, 2001

The collapse of the World Trade Center is one of those rare tragedies that people will ask of us in the future, in who knows how many languages, “Do you remember where you were, on that day?”

These pages are about exactly that: the weeks that followed the terrorist attacks of September 11th.

These pages are also a thank you. For additional photographs, please see 13 Days and 13 Months.

Jonathan Corum

That is a wonderful place to spend some time, and get a perspective of what NYC residents had experienced during the days and months after those Twin Towers collapsed.

The photo up top, of the shoe covered in dust is from The September 11 Digital Archive « American Social History Project | Center for Media and Learning

On September 11, 2001, people around the world reacted to the attacks by using the Internet and digital media. This project is dedicated to the collection, preservation, and presentation of the history of that day and its aftermath. The Archive contains more than 150,000 digital items, including more than 40,000 emails and other electronic communications, more than 40,000 first-hand stories, and more than 15,000 digital images. In September 2003, the Library of Congress accepted the Archive into its collections, an event that both ensured the Archive’s long-term preservation and marked the library’s first major digital acquisition.. An unprecedented experiment in digital archival collecting, The September 11 Digital Archive became the Library of Congress‘s first major digital acquisition. The site was produced by ASHP/CML and the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Visit The September 11 Digital Archive: http://911digitalarchive.org/

Unfortunately, those photos from the Library of Congress are only thumbnail size. You can only see full sized images on the LoC computers…which is really a shame because not everyone can get to Washington, DC.  That is a real disappointment for me at least, I really would have liked to see the images larger than those 190 pixels.

Then there are a few more photos I came across while gathering links for this post:

Liberty Plaza

Liberty Street or Maiden Lane

Downtown Hell

From Time Magazine: 9/11: The Photographs That Moved Them Most – LightBox

Robert Clark—INSTITUTE
Kent Kobersteen, former Director of Photography of National Geographic“The pictures are by Robert Clark, and were shot from the window of his studio in Brooklyn. Others shot the second plane hitting the tower, but I think there are elements in Clark’s photographs that make them special. To me the wider shots not only give context to the tragedy, but also portray the normalcy of the day in every respect except at the Towers. I generally prefer tighter shots, but in this case I think the overall context of Manhattan makes a stronger image. And, the fact that Clark shot the pictures from his studio indicates how the events of 9/11 literally hit home. I find these images very compelling—in fact, whenever I see them they force me to study them in great detail.”
David Surowiecki—Getty Images
Patrick Witty, International Picture Editor of TIME;
former freelance photographer
“After the towers fell, I walked back to my apartment on the Lower East Side, completely in a daze. I had shot black and white film that morning and there was a small lab in the kitchen of my neighbor’s apartment where I could process and scan. When I walked inside, covered in dust and a ripped t-shirt, my neighbors were there and we looked at each other in silence, in disbelief. Another photographer was there who I didn’t know, named David Surowiecki. At the time he was an editor at Getty Images, along with my old roommate Craig Allen. David and Craig were scanning film and transmitting the images from the apartment since Getty’s offices had been evacuated. David’s film from the morning was on a light table near the film dryer in the kitchen. I started looking at his film with a loupe and will never forget the feeling of despair when I saw this one particular image. It was a bizarre and terrifying, yet almost calm image, split down the middle with four tiny bodies falling to the ground. I saw bodies falling when I was near the burning towers, but I didn’t shoot it myself. I couldn’t.

That gallery has 23 images, some of them you may have seen before, but it is good to look at them again. My husband has told me that he saw groups people jumping together. A chain twenty-two people, holding each others hands and choosing to jump to their death. Horrifying.

Here is a link to the  National September 11 Memorial & Museum | World Trade Center Memorial. The website had a live stream of the Memorial service from Ground Zero…hopefully you can catch a recorded video at that link if you missed the live broadcast.

You can find some interactive information here at this link: National September 11 Memorial & Museum

Please join us in commemorating this year’s 9/11 anniversary. This page offers suggestions and tools including a downloadable 2012 Commemoration Planning Guide that provides resources for commemorating in communities, schools, through social media, and as an individual. Should you have any questions, please email us honor911@911memorial.org.

Thank you for helping to honor and remember.

Commemoration Resources
Promotional Materials for Your Commemoration
Education Tools
Fundraising Tools
Web Resources 
Share Your Plans

Commemoration Resources
2012 Commemoration Planning Guide 
Commemorate in your Online Community
Downloadable Suggestions for Talking to Children about 9/11
Downloadable List of Names on the 9/11 Memorial 
Online Guide for Locating and Searching Names on the 9/11 Memorial
September 11 National Day of Service and Remembrance

Promotional Materials for Your Commemoration
Newsletter/Email Template
Press Release Template
Sample Blog Post Template
Web Banners
Downloadable Poster
Facebook Cover Photo

Educational Tools
9/11 FAQ
Interactive Timelines
Introducing the 9/11 Memorial Lesson Plan
Symbols of Remembrance and Reflection Lesson Plan
Creating a Memorial Museum Lesson Plan

I don’t know how I feel about this, but they even have a Museum Shop. 

9/11 Memorial Bowtie

See what I mean? I know that net proceeds go towards the museum, but there is something twistedly morbid in wearing a 9/11 memorial bowtie. (Yeah, I just made up my own word there…) Let’s just end this post with some news links that are connected with 9/11.

And thank you for taking time out today to remember and reflect on this…

September 11.