Wednesday: Ain’t there one damn song that can make me…Break down and cry?

 

And I did cry…

I found out about David Bowie’s death around 4;00 am Monday Morning, it was so sad. Bowie was born in 1947…the same year as my dad, maybe that was why it touched a nerve? I don’t know. But as the days have past since the news of his death, I’ve been able to look back on his music and massive product of work. I see now just exactly amount of thread this artist has woven through my memories. For all my life.

Simon Pegg sent out this tribute tweet:

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I was born in April 1970. Space Oddity was 1st released in July of 1969. For me that tweet is especially true.

 

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The post today will feature artwork by David Bowie and include a few links to photo galleries…as well as a few other articles about Bowie the man, flaws included.

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Just a couple of thoughts before we start.

My mom took me to see Cat People and The Hunger back when I was a kid…

 

I can still feel that powerful voice of Bowie’s pounding in the theater as the credits rolled when he sang Putting Out The Fire.

 

 

And I always thought, for some strange reason…that he would live forever somewhere…never imagining that he would die a few days after turning 69.

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Now for the links.

Highlights of President Obama’s 2016 State of the Union Address – Politics – NYTimes.com

Full text of President Barack Obama’s 2016 State of the Union Address

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And if you didn’t catch the speech…check this out:

CNN Releases Video Imagining the State of the Union as a Wes Anderson Movie (No, Really) | Mediaite

“What if the State of the Union was like a Wes Anderson movie?”, asked no one ever. Well, CNN is here to answer your question, nobody!

And, well, it’s not so much a movie as it is a primer on the history of the State of the Union address and all the things that go into making it happen.

(P.S. If CNN is taking requests, next year do it Tarantino-style. God knows these speeches could use some tense moments and balls-to-the-wall profanity.)

Gag….okay.

Now, moving on.

Interesting video here: Arctic seed vault ‘key to future global crops’ – BBC News

And then you have this newsy bit here: Rupert Murdoch and Jerry Hall Are Engaged | Vanity Fair

 

Ugh, more gag.

Meanwhile on the Ted Cruz “birther” irony front:

Under Ted Cruz’s own logic, he’s ineligible for the White House – The Boston Globe

There’s more than meets the eye in the ongoing dustup over whether Ted Cruz is eligible to serve as president, which under the Constitution comes down to whether he’s a “natural born citizen” despite his 1970 Canadian birth. Senator Cruz contends his eligibility is “settled” by naturalization laws Congress enacted long ago. But those laws didn’t address, much less resolve, the matter of presidential eligibility, and no Supreme Court decision in the past two centuries has ever done so. In truth, the constitutional definition of a “natural born citizen” is completely unsettled, as the most careful scholarship on the question has concluded. Needless to say, Cruz would never take Donald Trump’s advice to ask a court whether the Cruz definition is correct, because that would in effect confess doubt where Cruz claims there is certainty.

People are entitled to their own opinions about what the definition ought to be. But the kind of judge Cruz says he admires and would appoint to the Supreme Court is an “originalist,” one who claims to be bound by the narrowly historical meaning of the Constitution’s terms at the time of their adoption. To his kind of judge, Cruz ironically wouldn’t be eligible, because the legal principles that prevailed in the 1780s and ’90s required that someone actually be born on US soil to be a “natural born” citizen. Even having two US parents wouldn’t suffice. And having just an American mother, as Cruz did, would have been insufficient at a time that made patrilineal descent decisive.

This narrow definition reflected 18th-century fears of a tyrannical takeover of our nation by someone loyal to a foreign power — fears that no longer make sense. But the same could be said of fears that a tyrannical federal army might overrun our state militias. Yet that doesn’t lead Cruz — or, more importantly, the conservative jurists he admires — to discard the Second Amendment’s “right to bear arms” as a historical relic, or to limit that right to arms-bearing by members of today’s “state militias,” the national guard.

On the other hand, the kind of judge I admire and Cruz abhors is a “living constitutionalist,” one who believes that the Constitution’s meaning evolves with the perceived needs of the time and longstanding practice. To that kind of judge, Cruz would be eligible to serve because it no longer makes sense to be bound by the narrow historical definition that would disqualify him.

When Cruz was my constitutional law student at Harvard, he aced the course after making a big point of opposing my views in class — arguing stridently for sticking with the “original meaning” against the idea of a more elastic “living Constitution” whenever such ideas came up. I enjoyed jousting with him, but Ted never convinced me — nor did I convince him.

At least he was consistent in those days. Now, he seems to be a fair weather originalist, abandoning that method’s narrow constraints when it suits his ambition.

Ted Cruz is not eligible to be president – The Washington Post

Donald Trump is actually right about something: Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) is not a natural-born citizen and therefore is not eligible to be president or vice president of the United States.

The Constitution provides that “No person except a natural born Citizen . . . shall be eligible to the Office of President.” The concept of “natural born” comes from common law, and it is that law the Supreme Court has said we must turn to for the concept’s definition. On this subject, common law is clear and unambiguous. The 18th-century English jurist William Blackstone, the preeminent authority on it, declared natural-born citizens are “such as are born within the dominions of the crown of England,” while aliens are “such as are born out of it.” The key to this division is the assumption of allegiance to one’s country of birth. The Americans who drafted the Constitution adopted this principle for the United States. James Madison, known as the “father of the Constitution,” stated, “It is an established maxim that birth is a criterion of allegiance. . . . [And] place is the most certain criterion; it is what applies in the United States.”

Cruz is, of course, a U.S. citizen. As he was born in Canada, he is not natural-born. His mother, however, is an American, and Congress has provided by statute for the naturalization of children born abroad to citizens. Because of the senator’s parentage, he did not have to follow the lengthy naturalization process that aliens without American parents must undergo. Instead, Cruz was naturalized at birth. This provision has not always been available. For example, there were several decades in the 19th century when children of Americans born abroad were not given automatic naturalization.

Article I of the Constitution grants Congress the power to naturalize an alien — that is, Congress may remove an alien’s legal disabilities, such as not being allowed to vote. But Article II of the Constitution expressly adopts the legal status of the natural-born citizen and requires that a president possess that status. However we feel about allowing naturalized immigrants to reach for the stars, the Constitution must be amended before one of them can attain the office of president. Congress simply does not have the power to convert someone born outside the United States into a natural-born citizen.

Let me be clear: I am not a so-called birther. I am a legal historian. President Obama is without question eligible for the office he serves. The distinction between the president and Cruz is simple: The president was born within the United States, and the senator was born outside of it. That is a distinction with a difference.

Thanks to Boston Boomer for the H/T on both of those links.

Back to some bad journalism… now that it has been a few days since that riveting piece of “journalism” from Sean Penn in the latest Rolling Stone? (Flash Frame: That was a piece of shit.)

The problem with Rolling Stone’s El Chapo interview isn’t Sean Penn. It’s his editors. – Poynter

If you’re an editor about to send a famous and sympathetic writer to interview one of the world’s most notorious villains, here’s how you might prep him:

First, drill him on his assumptions and make sure there is an intellectual argument elsewhere to back him up.

Then, you’d likely remind him that his loyalty should be with his readers, not his subject. And you’d reinforce that by helping him anticipate the natural questions those readers might bring to such a controversial interview.

You’d want to see his interview questions ahead of time to ensure they are asked in neutral language that will hold your notorious source accountable.

Of course you’d advise him that it’s unacceptable to cut a deal that provides the source with prior review.

And finally, you’d remind him that the story must be well-reported and intellectually honest, so that it could stand on its own without a byline. That’s how you know it’s worth the paper it’s printed on.

It’s common for a writer’s ambitions to outpace his talents. (Sean Penn, you are no Hunter S. Thompson). That’s what editors are for. The best editors lift writers above the level they might reach on their own. They bring discipline to wandering pieces. They force writers to nail down assumptions and abandon unnecessary prose.

The editor’s role on the front end is the easy work. All he had to do was prepare Penn to set aside his own ego and go into the interview with his loyalties firmly on the side of Rolling Stone’s audience. But that front end work often makes the heavy lifting on the back side a bit lighter. During the actual writing, an editor should have been working with Penn to identify a structure, build a coherent argument and then challenge readers to see a complicated character operating in a complicated system.

How do you do that? You have to bring in other voices. Here’s what’s missing from Penn’s El Chapo piece…

Take a look at that link to see what is missing. I would guess that Penn did not do this work with Rolling Stone backing his moves. I suggest it is a Penn deal alone…and possibly a movie in the works all along. The “article” was probably shopped to the highest bidder and under no circumstance could it be “edited” because it is Penn’s pitch in glorified shit filled black and white print. *Note: I may be wrong here, in which case I really don’t give a damn…but that is my own opinion on the matter.

But what does give me a problem about this commentary on what Penn’s article is missing…is that there is a big stink about the single Penn’s crappy piece, but what about the fucking trash put out by journalist on a daily basis? Ana Kasparian is asking that question in this article:

Sean Penn interviews El Chapo and suddenly journalists care about ethics

No one expected Sean Penn to interview the world’s most wanted drug kingpin after he escaped prison for the second time. But three months before El Chapo was recaptured by Mexican Marines, he was hanging out with the actor in a jungle for a lengthy Rolling Stone interview. In an interesting turn of events, Penn’s discussion with El Chapo has been criticized as “unethical” by politicians and journalists who couldn’t score or stomach the interview.

At the heart of the issue is how Penn allowed the violent head of the Sinaloa drug cartel to sign off on the final Rolling Stone piece, which certainly does breach journalistic ethics. One rule of journalism is to ensure that the subject being reported on doesn’t have any sway or influence on the final product, and letting El Chapo decide what can and can’t be published defeats the true purpose of doing the interview in the first place.

“Allowing any source control over a story’s content is inexcusable,” Andrew Seaman, chair of the Society of Professional Journalist’s ethics committee wrote in a blog post. “The practice of pre-approval discredits the entire story. The writer, who in this case is an actor and activist, may write the story in a more favorable light and omit unflattering facts in an attempt to not be rejected.”

Seaman does make a good point. But with the daily ethics violations committed by people who were actually trained to be journalists, it does seem strange that all of a sudden members of the media want to hash out what’s acceptable in reporting the news or conducting interviews.

You’re goddamn right!

It is a shame that her article is only a couple of more paragraphs long, using an example regarding a situation with PBS and funding to illustrate her point (go and read the rest at the link) but it should open the can of worms, don’t ya think?

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Mona had a question up on her Facebook feed…about this topic…I think this article is a good way to open it up for discussion:

The dark side of David Bowie: As the mourning goes on, we can’t ignore his history with underaged groupies in ’70s – Salon.com

More Bowie, this time pictures:

vintage everyday: The Icon of Androgynous Fashion Style – Marvelous Color Photos of David Bowie in the 1970s-80s

vintage everyday: Amazing Vintage Photos of David Bowie in the early Days of His Career

On with a few more news links.

Pennsylvania police fatally shoot 12-year-old at her home | US news | The Guardian

Scientists struggle to stay grounded after possible gravitational wave signal | Science | The Guardian

Father of Koch Brothers Helped Build Nazi Oil Refinery, Book Says – The New York Times

Central American immigrants scramble for options to deportation by U.S. | Reuters

In human rights news:

Saudi Arabia Arrests Samar Badawi, Human Rights Advocate – The New York Times

U.N. war crimes investigators gathering testimony from starving Syrian town | Reuters

Let’s not end on that note.

The Mysteriously Tiny Drawings of an 18th-Century Artist, Born Without Hands or Feet

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In Wordplay: Matthias Buchinger’s Drawings from the Collection of Ricky Jay, opening today at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, there’s a 1724 engraved self-portrait that the “Little Man of Nuremberg” would have used to promote his act. As the portrait shows, the German-born artist, who stood 29 inches tall, was born without hands or feet.

Using an implement he wielded with his stumps, Buchinger excelled in calligraphy, ornamentation, and micrography, the practice of making patterns with tiny letters. In this self-portrait, in the curls of his wig, he has written seven full psalms and the Lord’s Prayer.

Art was just one of Buchinger’s talents. He was a master magician, superb marksman, and a virtuoso musical-instrument player, to name a few of the skills he was paid to perform in fairgrounds and noble houses across Europe. He could also throw dice, and could put wooden objects in tiny bottles.

To contemporary sensibilities, the idea of an 18th-century dwarf magician getting a Met show of his text art might come off as an arch conceptual hoax. But Buchinger was real, and very much a part of his time.

Oh, how I wish I could see this exhibit.

Wordplay: Matthias Buchinger’s Drawingsfrom the Collection of Ricky Jay | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

January 8–April 11, 2016

Exhibition Location: The Robert Wood Johnson, Jr. Gallery, 2nd floor,Gallery 690

Approximately 15 drawings by the 18th-century German artist Matthias Buchinger (1674–1739), who was born without hands or feet, will be presented in Wordplay: Matthias Buchinger’s Drawings from the Collection of Ricky Jay, opening at the Metropolitan Museum on January 8, 2016. Despite his physical limitations, Buchinger was celebrated in his own time as a draftsman and calligrapher as well as a magician and musician, and poetic broadsides were written in Europe and Britain about his many talents and achievements. Known as “the Little Man of Nuremberg” because he was only 29 inches tall, Buchinger lived a nomadic existence and boasted a clientele that included noblemen, kings, and emperors, along with members of the public who visited him at inns and fairs, from Leipzig to Paris and London to Belfast.

And in another Met website link:

Color The Temple: Using Projected Light to Restore Color | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

It is a long read but fascinating.

Did You Know The Temple Wasn’t Always Beige?

The small square shows a cleaned surface on a temple in the Karnak Temple Complex. Image courtesy of the authors

Temples in Egypt, and in much of the ancient world, were not only carved with detailed reliefs, but also painted with vivid colors, like the example from the Karnak Temple Complex shown above. The small square shows a cleaned surface in an otherwise soot- and grime-covered relief scene. This small section at Karnak allows visitors to see the temple in new ways, and we set out to do this digitally with The Temple of Dendur.

The Temple of Dendur was originally located on an ancient site south of Aswan in the West Bank of the Nile, near the border between Egypt and the Sudan. Because the Nile flooded every year, the Egyptian government attempted to control the water through a series of dams. However, by the late 1920s, Dendur and the surrounding area was flooded for nine months out of the year. In the 1960s, the Egyptian government planned to construct a new dam that would have made this flooding permanent year-round.

Well, that is all for today…

Have a safe Wednesday. This is an open thread.

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22 Comments on “Wednesday: Ain’t there one damn song that can make me…Break down and cry?”

  1. Don’t know why the thread was saying it was published yesterday at 9pm. I changed it though.

    Have a good day y’all.

  2. dakinikat says:

    Great post today! So many terrific links! I’m thinking I’m gonna do Ziggy for Mardi Gras if I can manage it. I was like 13 when space oddity came out. He really changed the music.

  3. NW Luna says:

    Thanks for the story on the Egyptian temple colors. Sometime when reading history I recall an archeologist describing a recently excavated tomb with good color preservation — dark blue sky on the ceiling with gold stars and moon, and the amazing experience he felt.

    Makes me think about medieval Norman and Gothic cathedrals, which were originally painted inside.

    Cathedrals were elaborate and brightly coloured before much of the interior decoration and original medieval art was destroyed during the Reformation and the Civil War. During the Civil War, cathedrals were used as garrisons, prisons and even stables. Now only traces remain of the vibrant colours that were often whitewashed out of existence.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/architecture_cathedral_01.shtml

  4. NW Luna says:

    Thoughtful article on the unequal power relationships between rock stars (predatory or at least thoughtless older men who are famous and rich), and young girls (“groupies”), and cultural expectations.

  5. bostonboomer says:

    Here’s something exciting. Eric Holder is endorsing Hillary Clinton.

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  6. Fannie says:

    I just have a feeling that in Bowie’s next life, or afterlife, he’ll have suitcases of clothes and colors to go with the seasons, and you’ll see him dancing high in the sky.

    His collection of clothes should be cataloged, and preserved. Thanks for the exposure to his art, you get a sense of how he saw his self, his worth.