Tuesday Reads

Good Morning!

The state of America’s democratic experiment really worries me these days.  It seems so railroaded by the interests of the very few.   I’m not sure if you got a girlwflagchance to read the following article at Salon by Bill Curry.  You should.  It’s about how the Democratic Party got co-opted by Wall Street interests and helped continue us down the road to complete plutocracy. It starts with out following the decline in the party’s alignment with ordinary Americans and the history of Ralph Nader’s formation of the consumer protection movement. Ultimately, it is about Nader and his new book.  But,the details of the re-alignment and Nader’s personal history are an interesting read when put into the context of our road to corporate tyranny.

In the late ’70s, deregulation fever swept the nation. Carter deregulated trucks and airlines; Reagan broke up Ma Bell, ending real oversight of phone companies. But those forays paled next to the assaults of the late ’90s. The Telecommunications Act of 1996 had solid Democratic backing as did the Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999. The communications bill authorized a massive giveaway of public airwaves to big business and ended the ban on cross ownership of media. The resultant concentration of ownership hastened the rise of hate radio and demise of local news and public affairs programming across America. As for the “modernization” of financial services, suffice to say its effect proved even more devastating. Clinton signed and still defends both bills with seeming enthusiasm.

The Telecommunications Act subverted anti-trust principles traceable to Wilson. The financial services bill gutted Glass-Steagall, FDR’s historic banking reform. You’d think such reversals would spark intra-party debate but Democrats made barely a peep. Nader was a vocal critic of both bills. Democrats, he said, were betraying their heritage and, not incidentally, undoing his life’s work. No one wanted to hear it. When Democrats noticed him again in 2000 the only question they thought to ask was, what’s got into Ralph? Such is politics in the land of the lotus eaters.

The furor over Nader arose partly because issues of economic and political power had, like Nader himself, grown invisible to Democrats. As Democrats continued on the path that led from Coehlo to Clinton to Obama, issues attendant to race, culture and gender came to define them. Had they nominated a pro-lifer in 2000 and Gloria Steinem run as an independent it’s easy to imagine many who berated Nader supporting her. Postmortems would have cited the party’s abandonment of principle as a reason for its defeat. But Democrats hooked on corporate cash and consultants with long lists of corporate clients were less attuned to Nader’s issues.

Democrats today defend the triage liberalism of social service spending but limit their populism to hollow phrase mongering (fighting for working families, Main Street not Wall Street). The rank and file seem oblivious to the party’s long Wall Street tryst. Obama’s economic appointees are the most conservative of any Democratic president since Grover Cleveland but few Democrats seem to notice, or if they notice, to care.

1aee802fea74274d99f1422520e26f7fThis also happened along side a group of democratic senators–including Joe Biden–that helped seat the 5 generic, oddball Catholic men that threaten everything the country stands for by deciding almost SCOTUS decisions  in oddball Catholic ways.  (You have to wonder if they listen at all to the current Pope.)  Additionally, things have gotten so right wing in the diplomacy sector that John Kerry and Barack Obama’s state department seem to be tilting in the same direction as the neocon-infested, apartheid loving Israeli government of Bibi the Butcher of Gaza.

This certainly isn’t the party of my FDR-loving Great Grandmother Nancy Anna Chisholm Williams whose father and uncle blazed the west with the Chisholm Trail and who lived and died a Depression surviving Okie.  Big political interests keep driving the Democrats into very undemocratic places.

The Obama administration deserves much of the blame for the failure of the latest round of Israeli-Palestinian peace talks.

It had originally been hoped that the United States would present a binding framework along the lines of what moderate Israeli and Palestinian political leaders had agreed to in unofficial talks in Geneva in 2003: Israel would recognize a Palestinian state based roughly on the pre-1967 borders with mutual territorial swaps, which would leave the Palestinians with 22 percent of historic Palestine and allow Israel to keep the remaining 78 percent; the Palestinian state would be demilitarized and all irregular militias disarmed; illegal settlements in occupied Palestinian territory near the Israeli border—encompassing close to 80 percent of the settlers—would be incorporated into Israel while settlers in the more remote settlements would be required to return to Israel; there would be no right of return for Palestinian refugees to Israel, but there would be international assistance in helping them resettle in the new Palestinian state; and some Israeli troops would remain along border crossings between the Palestinian state and its Arab neighbors, eventually to be replaced by international forces.

The Palestinian government agreed to these terms. Israel rejected them. Rather than make public this framework, and thereby hope the Israeli public would pressure its right-wing government to compromise, the Obama administration instead insisted that “both sides” had shown a lack of will to compromise.

An interview with an anonymous U.S. official close to the peace talks in an Israeli publication confirmed numerous other reports that, despite the Obama administration’s claims to the contrary, the Palestinian side made major concessions while the Israeli side essentially refused to make any, generally refusing to talk about any substantive issues.

A host of Democratic and Republican former officials—including a former national security adviser, secretary of defense, chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, trade representative, and undersecretary of state for political affairs—went on record arguing that the Obama administration would have to challenge the Israeli government’s hard line towards the Palestinians in order for the peace process to be successful. Unfortunately, the White House apparently had no interest in doing so.

Instead, Washington has focused on Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas’s refusal to give in to U.S. and Israeli demands that he recognize Israel as a “Jewish state.” While the Palestinian government, the Palestine Liberation Organization, and the ruling Fatah party have all recognized the state of Israel for more than 20 years, the Obama administration has effectively moved the goalposts by declaring that recognizing the Israeli government, acknowledging its right to exist, and providing security guarantees is not enough, insisting that the Palestinians explicitly recognize the state of Israel’s ethno-religious identity as well. No previous administration has put forward such a requirement. President Carter never made such demands on Egypt, nor did President Clinton require this of Jordan as a condition for their peace treaties with Israel. Abbas has said that Israel can identify itself however it wants, but—given that 20 percent of the Israeli population is ethnically Palestinian Arab—it would be politically impossible to agree to something that would acknowledge second-class status for other Palestinians.

Never in history has any country been required to recognize the ethnic or religious identity of another state as a condition for peace. It appears, then, that the Obama administration’s demand may have been an effort to destroy any chance of a peace agreement and leave an opening to blame the Palestinians—despite their agreement to virtually every other issue—for the failure of the peace process.

The failure may also come from President Obama’s trusting Secretary of State John Kerry, a longtime supporter of the Israeli right, to play such a key role in the peace talks. In 2004, Kerry unconditionally endorsed an Israeli plan to unilaterally and illegally annex large areas of the West Bank, leaving the Palestinians with only a series of small non-contiguous cantons surrounded by Israel as their “state,” a proposal denounced worldwide as a violation of the UN Charter, a series of UN Security Council resolutions, and basic principles of international law. Indeed, Kerry has long insisted that it was “unrealistic” to demand an Israeli withdrawal from its occupied territories. (By contrast, Kerry has demanded that Russia withdraw completely from Crimea, citing the illegality of any country acquiring “part or all of another state’s territory through coercion or force.”)

A Democratic administration is basically supporting an apartheid state replete with ethnic cleansing.   Under what world does a secular, U.S. 586abc388d8e5ab94dee6a936e26ea36democracy support an apartheid-creating theocracy that won’t follow any agreements it made previously?   Why are we the lone country cowering in the corner with a government gone genocidal instead of searching out the country’s numerous moderates and secular leaders and finding a path to coexistance?  It truly worries me that  former SOS Hillary Clinton who went on Fareed Zakaria’s show on Sunday may continue down this road of letting huge political donors outweigh solutions and fairness. Yet, her interview sounded like there’s some key differences between Kerry’s handling of this situation and the previous problems handled by Clinton.  Is she distancing herself from her former boss and signalling that things will be different with her in charge?  Will US domestic and foreign policy stop lurching to the right?

ZAKARIA: Bibi Netanyahu…

CLINTON: Right.

ZAKARIA: You say you had a complicated, and it sounded like a difficult relationship with him.

CLINTON: Well, I have to say, I’ve known Bibi a long time. And I have a very good relationship with him, in part because we can yell at each other and we do. And I was often the designated yeller. Something would happen, a new settlement announcement would come and I would call him up, “What are you doing, you’ve got to stop this.” And we understood each other, because I know how hard it is to be the leader of a relatively small country that is under constant pressure, and does face a lot of legitimate threats to its existence from those around it. And I also care deeply about how Israel is able not just to survive, but thrive, and just fundamentally disagreed with Bibi in the ’90s that I was in favor of a two-state solution. I was the first person associated with any administration to say that out loud. And he did not. But then when he came back in in 2009, he did. And I’ve sat with him, as you and I are sitting, and I really believed that if he thought he could get adequate security guarantees for a long enough period of time, he would be able to resolve everything with the exception of Jerusalem, which is the hardest issue. You can get borders and if you can figure out how to do security within those borders, some of which may require having IDF and international forces in the Jordan Valley, for example, then if you could move toward a state and leave Jerusalem to be worked on, because that’s the hardest issue for all sides.

ZAKARIA: But, you know, he gave an interview recently to, I think it was The Times of Israel where he said there are no circumstances under which we will ever relinquish security control of the area west of the Jordan, meaning, the West Bank. That sounds like it’s a – it’s going back on his acceptance of the two-state solution.

CLINTON: Well, Fareed, I see that as an – as an opening negotiating position, because I’ve had the private one-on-one conversations and the private conversations with him sitting there and – and Mahmoud Abbas sitting there and George Mitchell sitting there. And I know that Abbas, in my conversations, was willing to entertain a number of years where there could be some continuing security. Remember, the IDF – the Israel Defense Forces – have a working relationship with the Palestinian Authority security forces, which have been incredibly professional. We’ve helped to provide training, as has Jordan and others, and the positions that Netanyahu has taken. Now, once they take a position, and I know the years that Abbas has said are – are permitted and – and I know the years that Bibi has demanded, you’re in a negotiation. But if there’s no process going on, which is why we can’t even leave the vacuum of no process, despite how incredibly frustrating it is, then, of course Abbas is going to say never, not under any circumstances, and Bibi is going to say absolutely forever.

ZAKARIA: In 2009, you said that you wanted Israel settlement activity to stop. In fact, you were pretty blunt. You said no exceptions.

CLINTON: Um-hmm.

ZAKARIA: You write in the book that that was a tactical mistake because it made on – Bibi Netanyahu get even more hardline.

CLINTON: Right.

ZAKARIA: But Martin Indyk has just resigned as the you know, the kind of – the sherpa of the peace process. And he says that the immediate trigger, in his view, there were many, but was the fact that the Palestinians looked at the Israeli continued settlement activity…

CLINTON: Right.

ZAKARIA: – and said these guys are not serious, we’re never going to be able to get a state…

CLINTON: Right.

ZAKARIA: – look at what they’re doing.

CLINTON: This is my biggest complaint, with the Israeli government. I am a strong supporter of Israel, a strong supporter of their right to defense themselves. But the continuing settlements, which have been denounced by successive American administrations on both sides of the aisle, are clearly a terrible signal to send, if, at the same time, you claim you’re looking for a two-state solution. Now, when I was negotiating and I had been able to put together three face-to-face meetings between Netanyahu and Abbas, it was clear that if we were working off the ’67 borders, which was our stated position that President Obama had outlined, some of the settlements would be within any responsible drawing of borders for Israel. But a number of them would not. And those that would not would have to be either dismantled or live under Palestinian rule. There are deep wells of mistrust and misunderstanding on both sides. And what I’ve urged the Israelis to do is do more to help the Palestinians in the West Bank right now. Don’t monopolize the water. Don’t make it difficult to build. So even while we’re struggling over the end issues that would resolve the conflict, like borders, don’t make life so miserable, you know, because that’s not any way to begin to try to deal with the mistrust. You know, the longer I do this, Fareed, the more convinced I am that mistrust and misunderstanding are often the real fundamental obstacles to bringing people together. And that means that people from both sides of whatever divide it is, whether it’s Israeli, Palestinian, you know, Russian-speaking, Ukraine-speaking, whatever it might be, people have to start listening and working together to build habits of cooperation that might possibly lead to greater trust.

b0e012742028c812b2cd54c4898bf81cThere are a number of articles where you read recent interviews with Hillary where she sounds more and more like a candidate these days. I want to hear that Hillary will take us back to democracy for all.  Not just for those who can purchase it.   Here’s Hillary on the US Border situation.

In a smart move, Hillary Clinton firmed up her position on the crisis in an interview that aired over the weekend — in a manner that, intentionally or not, sharpened the contrast with the position of most Republicans.

Speaking to Fusion’s Jorge Ramos, Clinton came out against any changes to the 2008 trafficking law, which Republicans are seeking to expedite deportations of arriving minors as a condition for supporting any money to address the debacle.

“I don’t agree that we should change the law,” Clinton told Ramos. She added that she wanted a more strenuous effort to distinguish between “migrant” children and “refugees,” to ensure that those who genuinely qualify for humanitarian relief in the U.S. obtain it. “I’m advocating an appropriate procedure, well funded by the Congress, which they are resisting doing, so that we can make individual decisions,” Clinton said. “We should be setting up a system in Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, to screen kids over there, before they get in the hands of coyotes.”

In opposing changes to the 2008 law, Clinton has placed herself a bit to the left of even Obama, who initially signaled openness to such changes before backtracking after Congressional Dems objected. And Clinton is also clarifying her previous suggestion that the kids should be “sent back.”

“Like Pelosi and Reid, she’s realized that the tough line of President Obama – change the law, send ‘em back – is not the position of most Democratic voters and lawmakers,” immigration advocate Frank Sharry tells me.  “She’s repositioned herself. Smart.”

db43999108457ef4e1738648a9984985Is it likely Hillary will move us back to more traditional Democratic policies or is she likely to continue the rightward drift of elected Democratic Leaders like Obama and even Bill Clinton?  A recent poll shows that Hillary is popular with white voters; more so than a lot of Democratic pols before her.

This entire idea of having a crazy right wing nut of  GOP while Democrats continue to cater to neocons and plutocrats still worries me. We use to have two functioning parties that represented fairly diverse groups of voters. It wasn’t all sweetness and light, but there wasn’t such a concentration of policy that benefited so few coming out of them both.  They also did the business of the people.   Now we still have two parties. It’s just that one represents crazy religionists and whacked out billionaire libertarians and the other one that occasionally does something for the common american still is likely to slide further to the right to attract rich, powerful donors.

So, that’s what’s on my mind.  What’s on your reading and blogging list today?


29 Comments on “Tuesday Reads”

  1. joanelle says:

    This is a wonderful post, Kat. It really got me thinking and wondering how we can support Hill’s focus on the ‘middle’ and letting her know how important it is to finally have a ‘Roosevelt Democrat’ who will focus on the people they represent instead of their moneyed backers.

    I read Paul Mulshine’s (with whom I rarely agree)article this AM about how we might have been better off leaving Saddam in control instead of the mess that Bush created, a really good piece but I couldn’t find a link. A real case of “the devil you know vs. the devil you don’t.”

  2. bostonboomer says:

    Interesting post, Dak.

    I worry about a Hillary Clinton presidency too. I know she’s nowhere near as liberal as I want her to be. But I don’t see anyone else with the qualifications we need in a president.

    I’m even more worried that the constant right wing attacks on her will have an effect and that the emoprogs will succeed in finding someone to divide Democratic voters so that we end up with a Republican in the White House. That would be a disaster beyond imaging.

    The Bill Curry article reinforces what I wrote yesterday about media consolidation and monopolies–and Democrats helped it happen.

    • bostonboomer says:

      I’m not sure how Hillary would handle Israel, but I’m willing to bet she’d be a lot tougher than John Kerry.

      • NW Luna says:

        Agree with all of the above.

        Hillary’s not nearly liberal enough for me. But her history, and statements show she is less rightist than
        Obama (that, as we knew, was evident back in 2008). I think she has the ability to negotiate and work with diseparate interests without pandering excessively. More ability to work with Congress.

        I liked this comment from Hillary:

        I see that as an – as an opening negotiating position,

        where she’s not rigid, rather calmly noting a place to start, not allowing herself to be distracted.

        The emprogs — I don’t think they’ll have as many voters fooled this time around. We need someone with experience and with good standing in the international arena.

    • RalphB says:

      That Bill Curry article was really a one-sided stinking opus to the piece of shit Ralph Nader. Fuck him! A lot of dead Iraqis probably think the same of “Not a dime’s worth of difference” between Bush and Gore. I wouldn’t spit on Nader if he were on fire.

      The Telecom Act of ’96 brought more media consolidation, which was happening already, and it also freed the spectrum for all the lovely wi-fi and smart phone service we have now.

      I didn’t know a publication could lose Greenwald and be worse for it, but Salon has done it.

      • RalphB says:

        In case you think I’m kidding about Salon, check out the ridiculous crap regularly penned by Thomas Frank or David Dayen or Sirota occasionally. It’s emo-garbage with zero heft but it probably makes some people feel better about themselves.

      • bostonboomer says:

        I have to admit I’m pretty hostile to Nader these days. He did a lot of good a long time ago. I also agree about breaking up Ma Bell. I think that was a positive thing.

      • janicen says:

        Seriously! Thanks to that asshole and all of the assholes who voted for him knowing he didn’t stand a chance but they wanted to “send a message” we now have corporations as people with religious rights. I second your emotion.

      • dakinikat says:

        I kind’ve ignored the asskissing of Nader. I have a friend that worked for him. He treated his staff like shit and no one has anything nice to say about him as a human being. I still can’t believe he said that shit that there was no difference between Gore and Dubya. But, it was a good set of information on how the party moved away from watching the rights of ordinary americans including all that deregulation that just set up unregulated oligopolies instead of regulated monopolies.

        I really don’t read much of Salon any more. I’m getting really tired of all these folks that label themselves “progressives” but seem to be as equally interested in their own well being as the right wing libertarians. They just swim in white male privilege.

    • dakinikat says:

      Yes, I saw the tie-in into the articles you had on media consolidation. It scares me that an asshat like Rupert Murdoch may get such a huge control over the news sources in this country.

  3. bostonboomer says:

    Hobby Lobby Allegedly Fired Employee Due to Pregnancy

    When a very pregnant Felicia Allen applied for medical leave from her job at Hobby Lobby three years ago, one might think that the company best known for denying its employees insurance coverage of certain contraceptives—on the false grounds that they cause abortions—would show equal concern for helping one of its employees when she learned she was pregnant.

    Instead, Allen says the self-professed evangelical Christian arts-and-crafts chain fired her and then tried to prevent her from accessing unemployment benefits.

    “They didn’t even want me to come back after having my baby, to provide for it,” she says.

    • NW Luna says:

      Yep; pro-life until birth.

    • RalphB says:

      Scumbags!

    • Fannie says:

      She was forced into signing away her rights in order to be hired. They fired her, and lied to her, all because she was having her baby. They refused her unemployment, and then told her she couldn’t sue them because she signed her rights away for justice in court. Yet they can go to court because they are a family corporation. They went so far as saying “Christians are not free to sue other Christians, per Matthews 18.15.70 ” She violated their community standards by getting pregnant! WTF, I’ve never seen such evil people/corporations in my life, may they burn in the hell of fires.

  4. bostonboomer says:

    Very funny:

    Read BuzzFeed’s Apology For Plagiarism But Now With GIFs!

    http://thedailybanter.com/2014/07/read-buzzfeed-editor-ben-smiths-apology-letter-gifs/

  5. RalphB says:

    Start-Up Guys 🙂

  6. dakinikat says:

    This is incredible. David Frum is spreading a rumor on twitter that the lead photo on the NYT today is “faked” and staged by Hammas as war porn. Here’s the series of photos and an information from the photographer showing that Frumm got his info from a right wing conspiracy site and it’s totally not true.

    http://www.bagnewsnotes.com/2014/07/david-frum-accuses-nyt-and-reuters-of-staging-gaza-hospital-photos/

  7. dakinikat says:

    http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/six-studies-that-show-everything-republicans-believe-is-wrong-20140423

    Six Studies That Show Everything Republicans Believe is Wrong
    It’s time for the right wing to stop lying about the minimum wage, taxes, global warming and more

    • NW Luna says:

      Evidence? Facts? Don’t bother us, our minds are made up. Headdesk.

      Thanks for the article, tho. It’ll give me new rejoinders when I encounter the wingnuts of denial and can’t stop myself from engaging in discussion.

  8. dakinikat says:

    IDF’s Gaza assault is to control Palestinian gas, avert Israeli energy crisis
    Israel’s defence minister has confirmed that military plans to ‘uproot Hamas’ are about dominating Gaza’s gas reserves

    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/earth-insight/2014/jul/09/israel-war-gaza-palestine-natural-gas-energy-crisis

  9. RalphB says:

    Absolutely brilliant!!!!

  10. RalphB says:

    tpm: Seems Like a Strong Case

    Attorneys for two Alabama doctors are seeking to dismiss a lawsuit brought by Johnny Lee Banks Jr. who claims that he entered the hospital for a routine circumcision but emerged from Princeton Baptist Medical Center without a penis. …

    Ouch, ouch, ouch!!!

  11. RalphB says:

    Sarah Palin started a inet tv channel. Stephen Colbert bought this one today. 🙂

    http://thesarahpalinchannel.com/