Sunday Reads in Darkness and Truth: All for Nothing…All for Everything

Good Morning

Yesterday I spent some time watching movies with my son, first we saw Sergeant York, with Gary Cooper, and after that we saw Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of Heaven with Orlando Bloom and Eva Green. It felt good to sit a few hours watching these films, and while we were watching, my son would ask me about things…like historical accuracy…or sometimes he would comment on the actors, and the way the scenes were shot.

The reason I bring all this up is because there is a line in that movie Kingdom of Heaven, when the character of Balian surrenders the city of Jerusalem to Saladin…

What is Jerusalem worth?  Nothing….Everything

I thought that line was fabulous, and while looking for articles to feature in this morning’s post, it seemed like an interesting shadow of a theme.

Not all of today’s articles will relay a message of nothing and everything, but some will.

Former Dictator Hosni Mubarak was sentenced yesterday to life in prison, or as the Judge described… “30 years of darkness.”  After the sentencing, Egyptians protested in the streets. There is an op/ed In the Independent by Robert Fisk that you should take a look at. Robert Fisk: Mubarak will die in jail, but that’s no thanks to us

Twenty-five years is death, isn’t it, if you’re 84 years old? Hosni Mubarak will die in jail. And Habib al-Adli, his interior minister, 74 years old, maybe he will be killed in jail if he doesn’t live out his life sentence. These were the thoughts of two old Egyptian friends of mine yesterday. And Mubarak was sentenced for the dead of the 2011 revolution. That’s 850 dead – 34 people for each year of his term. Quite a thought.

Of course, we were not asking about the death sentences at the military courts in the 1980s and 1990s – and we can’t, can we, when the military is still in power in Egypt. Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, the field marshal who runs the country, never suggested these courts – and their death sentences – were wrong. Mubarak was fighting “terror”, wasn’t he? On our behalf, I believe. For he was a “moderate”, a friend of the West, and maybe that’s why Mubarak’s sons, Gamal and Alaa, got off. Will they leave the country? Will they quit Egypt? No doubt.

So that’s the story. Let’s not mention Bashar al-Assad here. The Egyptian court was meant to be a lesson for him. Kofi Annan was down in Qatar, talking about the Syrian government’s sins yesterday. But, then, there are some problems, aren’t there? Didn’t Mubarak receive a few “renditioned” prisoners from George W Bush; tortured them, too, at Washington’s behest? And didn’t Damascus also torture a few “renditioned” prisoners – the name Arar comes to mind, a Canadian citizen, sent off from JFK for a touch of torture in the Syrian capital? Yes, our “moderate” Arabs were always ready to help us, weren’t they?

Read the rest at the link…and think about the nothing, everything quote.

Meanwhile, in Greece there have been some arrests involving recently elected MPs from the Greek neo-Nazi party Golden Dawn, who were arrested over a racist attack.

Nikolaos Michaloliakos

Greece’s neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party, led by Nikos Michaloliakos, won 21 seats in last month’s election. Photograph: Petros Giannakouris/AP

Two newly elected MPs from the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party were among six people arrested over an attack on a Pakistani man in Athens, in the latest in a series of incidents that have raised fears that Greece‘s immigrants are being targeted in the runup to this month’s crucial elections.

Ilias Panagiotaros and Ioannis Vouldis were briefly held alongside the daughter of Nikos Michaloliakos, Golden Dawn’s leader, but were later released. According to police, the attack took place late on Friday when a group involved in a protest turned on a 31-year-old Pakistani bypasser.

Golden Dawn confirmed two of its MPs had been held, but denied they took part in the attack. “[They] could not have been involved because they were miles away,”it said in a statement.

Golden Dawn caused consternation across Europe after winning 7% of the vote in Greece’s elections in May, giving them 21 seats. It is the first time the far right has sat in parliament since the fall of the military junta in 1974. With their neo-Nazi insignia, violent rhetoric and calls to expel Greece’s immigrants, Golden Dawn’s leaders are hoping to exploit political instability in Greece to gain further ground in elections called for 17 June after no party was able to form a government following last month’s vote.

This group ran disturbing ads prior to the first election,

…with the campaign slogan, “Let’s rid this country of the stench.” On election night Michaloliakos dedicated their success to “all the brave youngsters who wear black T-shirts with Golden Dawn written in white”. Unemployment in Greece now stands at at 22%, and 52% among young people, and the party has sought to capitalise on a mood of fear across a country that is struggling to come to terms with rising crime, falling living standards and a feeling that it is on the brink of economic and political meltdown.

Greece’s 1 million immigrants have become an easy target for neo-Nazi and other far-right groups, who regularly parade through Athens chanting racist slogans.

Connie mentioned this group in the comments a couple months ago when the Greek election results came in. I had no idea they were so “out there” with their hate. I mean, look at that campaign slogan…wait a minute, that sounds like something one of the GOP Border Patrol candidates would say.

Now, I am going to bring it back to the US…and another op/ed. This time from Charles M Blow in the New York Times. Darkness in the Sunshine State

Florida ought to know better. And must do better, particularly on the issue of voting and discrimination.

But, then again, we are talking about Florida, the state of Bush v. Gore infamy and the one that will celebrate the birthday of Jefferson Davis, the only president of the Confederacy, with a statewide holiday on Sunday.

What am I getting at? This: Few states in the union have done more in recent years to restrict and suppress voting — particularly by groups who lean Democratic, such as young people, the poor and minorities — than Florida.

Voter interference is very prevalent with the GOP, and it seems that the Dems aren’t speaking up loud enough against the purge going on in the Sunshine State. You are all well aware of the anniversary this past week, when Florida’s Democrat voters were disenfranchised by their own party.

I can’t quote the whole Blow op/ed, so again I will encourage you to read the entire post at the link above.

Some of what Blow touches on in his piece is the type of voter this tactical discrimination is aimed at, poorer minorities.

So, I think this next article about Income Inequality, Racism and Imprisonment sure seems to be a good follow-up to the Blow link. It has both the US rates and foreign country rates, but I will just quote the US ones.

Rates Increased in Unequal States.

The average rate of incarceration in the U.S. is 576 people in prison for every 100,000 people. Just as there are fewer persons per 100,000 in Japan (40 per 100K) who are in prison, there are differences between U.S. States in rates of imprisonment: Louisiana has an incredibly high rate, above 700 people per 100,000. Compare that to Minnesota, below 200 per 100,000. Maybe a difference of five or six times the percentage of people locked up between Louisiana and Minnesota. The chart below shows that these differences are correlated to income inequality differences in each State:

The article describes the way researchers came up with these graphs, but it also brings other things into the discussion.

Racism and Imprisonment.

TheSentencing Project graphs (see the bottom of page 4) show how the rate of incarceration for blacks is 6.70 times the number compared to the rate of incarceration of white people. The New Jim Crow book demonstrates how people of color are being persecuted and exterminated through the misuse and abuse of the U.S. courts and prison systems. The link to the Wikipedia summary is comprehensive and informative.  Stop and Frisk laws routinely sweep communities of color, arresting and imprisoning urban youth from impoverished communities. The war on the poor and people of color in the U.S. make manifest the extreme income inequality and deprivation of the class system in the U.S.. Racism is the penultimate expression of the worst, most oppressive but essential dynamic of income inequality.  The American imprisonment of people of color on a massive, genocidal scale is a direct outcome of a class based, extremely unequal society. In the U.S. a person of color is 6.04 times more likely to be in prison than a white person. In the courts, black youth are more likely to receive a harsher sentence than their white peers.

Again, I suggest going to the link and reading the whole thing. (And are you keeping that quote up top in the back of your mind…)

This next link is very personal…connected to me and my family. As you are all aware, my husband is a survivor of the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Center in New York. I completely disagree with the people below who feel that no mention should be made of the hijackers that flew the airliners into the Twin Towers. They must be made part of the museum, because truth must be told.

It seemed self-evident at the time: A museum devoted to documenting the events of Sept. 11, 2001, would have to include photographs of the hijackers who turned four passenger jets into missiles. Then two and a half years ago, plans to use the pictures were made public.

The museum has not decided whether to include a composite of several tower floors and other materials that were crushed and fused together during the collapse of the World Trade Center.

New York City’s fire chief protested that such a display would “honor” the terrorists who destroyed the World Trade Center. A New York Post editorial called the idea “appalling.” Groups representing rescuers, survivors and victims’ families asked how anyone could even think of showing the faces of the men who killed their relatives, colleagues and friends.

The anger took some museum officials by surprise.

“You don’t create a museum about the Holocaust and not say that it was the Nazis who did it,” said Joseph Daniels, chief executive of the memorial and museum foundation.

This anger surprised me too.

James Estrin/The New York Times

The museum has not decided whether to include a composite of several tower floors and other materials that were crushed and fused together during the collapse of the World Trade Center.

Such are the exquisite sensitivities that surround every detail in the creation of the National September 11 Memorial Museum, which  is being built on land that many revere as hallowed ground. During eight years of planning, every step has been muddied with contention. There have been bitter fights over the museum’s financing, which have delayed its opening until at least next year, as well as continuing arguments over its location, seven stories below ground; which relics should be exhibited; and where unidentified human remains should rest.

Even the souvenir key chains to be sold in the gift shop have become a focus of rancor.

But nothing has been more fraught than figuring out how to tell the story.

It is a very long article…like most of the links today, I hope you take the time to read it.

The “Tribute in Light” memorial is in remembrance of the events of September 11, 2001, in honor of the citizens who lost their lives in the World Trade Center attacks. The two towers of light are composed of two banks of high wattage spotlights that point straight up from a lot next to Ground Zero. The ÒTribute in LightÓ memorial was first held in March 2002. This photo was taken from Liberty State Park, New Jersey on September11, 2006, the five year anniversary of 9/11. USAF photo by Denise Gould.

My husband saw first hand the “body parts that littered lower Manhattan.”  He smelled the death and burning for months after the buildings fell. The suit he wore to work that day is covered in dust…remains of those who were killed…remains of friends he saw everyday.

This is not something that should be portrayed with kid gloves. The horror of the attack must be shown for what it was. So many people have put that day out of their minds, and I think it is wrong to sugar coat the facts and hide the truth.

Yes, I get that the Memorial should be a solemn place for remembrance. I am not talking about that…I am talking about the Museum, which is something that needs to be frank in its representation of that day. Everything must be laid out.

The quote up top comes through my mind once again….with the museum that depicts the tragedy of that September day…What is it worth? Nothing…Everything.


Mr. President, How About Supporting Democracy in the U.S.?

Yesterday, President Obama hypocrically praised the Egyptian pro-democracy demonstrators and argued forcefully in favor of the Egyptian government listening and responding to the demands of its people.

There are very few moments in our lives where we have the privilege to witness history taking place. This is one of those moments. This is one of those times. The people of Egypt have spoken, their voices have been heard, and Egypt will never be the same.

By stepping down, President Mubarak responded to the Egyptian people’s hunger for change. But this is not the end of Egypt’s transition. It’s a beginning. I’m sure there will be difficult days ahead, and many questions remain unanswered. But I am confident that the people of Egypt can find the answers, and do so peacefully, constructively, and in the spirit of unity that has defined these last few weeks. For Egyptians have made it clear that nothing less than genuine democracy will carry the day.

Back here in the U.S., President Obama listens only to the rich and powerful while ignoring a level of inequality higher than that in Egypt and an unemployment rate approximately the same as Egypt’s!

In the speech, Obama quoted a man who really stood for nonviolent protest and the fight for democracy:

As Martin Luther King said in celebrating the birth of a new nation in Ghana while trying to perfect his own, “There is something in the soul that cries out for freedom.” Those were the cries that came from Tahrir Square, and the entire world has taken note.

How dare you, Mr. Obama? You are a disgrace. You repeatedly imply comparisons between you and Martin Luther King, while behaving more like Mr. Mubarak.

What happens here in the U.S. when people peacefully protest the government’s policies? If it happens at Democratic or Republican party conventions, protesters are put in cages ironically called “free speech zones” that are far enough from the action to prevent the powerful from being disturbed by democracy-seeking rabble. Peace activists who identify as socialists or dare to support freedom movements in foreign countries are targeted by thuggish FBI raids and secret grand juries.

Mr. President, you and other members of your administration have repeatedly called for the Egyptian government to repeal its emergency laws. What about the emergency laws that have been in place here in the U.S. for many years?

Although most Americans would be surprised to hear it, the United States is technically experiencing more than one ongoing national emergency. In 1979, during the Iran Hostage Crisis, president Jimmy Carter declared a national emergency by executive order, which every president since has renewed. George W. Bush declared a separate state of emergency after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, which Barack Obama renewed.

These emergency measures are limited rather than general in nature. The 1976 National Emergencies Act set a two-year term on emergency declarations (although it’s possible to extend a declaration indefinitely), and requires the president to specify what, exactly, the state of emergency empowers him to do. The Sept. 11-related emergency gives the president the right to call retired officers back into active duty (among other powers). The Iran emergency prevents American citizens and companies from entering into oil development contracts with the Islamic Republic.

Those states of emergency have allowed you and your mentor predecessor George W. Bush to gain authoritarian powers for the executive branch through the USA Patriot Act and other unconstitutional laws like the Military Commissions Act. The powers granted by these laws have frequently been abused by government agencies.

Free Speech Zone at Democratic Convention, 2008

The Patriot Act has been reauthorized multiple times and is currently up for renewal.

So, Mr. Obama, what is your position on the latest attempts to keep the most intrusive parts of the Patriot Act from expiring?

When the act was first signed into law, Congress put in some “sunset” provisions to quiet the concerns of civil libertarians, but they were ignored by successive extensions. Unfortunately, those concerns proved to be well founded, and a 2008 Justice Department report confirmed that the FBI regularly abused their ability to obtain personal records of Americans without a warrant.

The answer to that question is that the President wants those provisions extended for three years–two years longer than the Republicans in the House are pushing for!

The Senate is working on an extension also, and one of the leaders in support of that effort is “Democrat” Diane Feinstein (whose investment banker husband has profited handsomely from defense contracts and other government largess related to the financial crisis)

At least one mainstream journalist has called attention to the hypocrisy of your policies this morning, Mr. President–focusing on your disdain for the poor and unemployed in the U.S. In the NYT, Bob Herbert writes:

As the throngs celebrated in Cairo, I couldn’t help wondering about what is happening to democracy here in the United States. I think it’s on the ropes. We’re in serious danger of becoming a democracy in name only.

While millions of ordinary Americans are struggling with unemployment and declining standards of living, the levers of real power have been all but completely commandeered by the financial and corporate elite. It doesn’t really matter what ordinary people want. The wealthy call the tune, and the politicians dance.

So what we get in this democracy of ours are astounding and increasingly obscene tax breaks and other windfall benefits for the wealthiest, while the bought-and-paid-for politicians hack away at essential public services and the social safety net, saying we can’t afford them. One state after another is reporting that it cannot pay its bills. Public employees across the country are walking the plank by the tens of thousands. Camden, N.J., a stricken city with a serious crime problem, laid off nearly half of its police force. Medicaid, the program that provides health benefits to the poor, is under savage assault from nearly all quarters.

The poor, who are suffering from an all-out depression, are never heard from. In terms of their clout, they might as well not exist. The Obama forces reportedly want to raise a billion dollars or more for the president’s re-election bid. Politicians in search of that kind of cash won’t be talking much about the wants and needs of the poor. They’ll be genuflecting before the very rich.

It’s noteworthy that Bob Herbert is saying such things out loud these days, but what we really need is some serious consciousness-raising among the American people as a whole. We could be joining together to fight back against encroachments on our liberties and our economic stability like the people in Egypt, Tunisia and Yemen. When will Americans wake up and see what is happening right here in the USA and begin to demand the restoration of our freedoms and our living standards? When will we fight back against growing government tyranny right here in the USA?


BREAKING: Military Takeover. Mubarak is GONE!

I just heard Suleiman read the statement.

Mubarak is gone. Military is taking over.

SHOCKWAVES THROUGHOUT THE REGION.

They said the kids couldn’t do it!

The people who died did not die in vain.

It’s been a long 18 days. From the Tahrir demonstrations at the end of January:


BREAKING: Mubarak has left Cairo

Alexandria, Friday prayers. Click image to go to Al Jazeera Live Blog on Egypt.

[UPDATE on report below: Now confirmed by Al Jazeera sources -- Mubarak has left Cairo for Sharm el-Sheikh.]

I’m seeing this unconfirmed report that Mubarak has left Cairo for Sharm el-Sheikh residence… AJE analyst saying Al Arabiya reported this and retracted it earlier (??) Not quite sure.

Ok, from the link:

Al Arabiya had initially reported Mubarak and his family had left Egypt.

So apparently they first reported that Mubarak had left Egypt, but then switched it to Cairo. Not sure if that is what the guy on AJE meant by retraction or not.

From the Al Jazeera Live Blog:

3:19pm Mubarak reported to have left Cairo with his family, the AFP news agency reports, citing a source close to the government. But it said his destination was not immediately clear.

3:31pm Senior ruling party official tells Al-arabiya station that Mubarak has delegated his authorities to the vice president last night, and he is now in-charge.

Mohamed Abdelllah, senior member of ruling party, also said that he had information that Mubarak was heading to Sharm el-Sheikh.

Denmark PM says Mubarak is toast and calls for his resignation:

3:48pm The prime minister of Denmark, Lars Rasmussen, has become the first European Union leader to call for Mubarak’s resignation… saying he is, quote, “history”.

Bostonboomer just caught this on twitter — there may be an “Urgent Statement” coming soon. The information comes from CNN Radio reporter Lisa Desjardins:

NEW #EGYPT STATEMENT COMING?: Banner on State TV just now read “urgent statement from office of the president shortly”.

This is a semi-live blog/developing thread. For more, see the Al Jazeera English LIVE feed (or AJE Live on youtube):


Breaking: Major Shouman tells Reuters “The armed forces’ solidarity movement with the people has begun”

Scroll past image for the actual post.

This is a PHOTO UPDATE; 12:20 pm in Cairo:

Click image to go to Al Jazeera Live Blog on Egypt

 

An Egyptian anti-government demonstrator holds a sign that reads in Arabic and English 'Hitler commited suicide, you can do it' at Cairo's Tahrir square on February 10, 2011 on the 17th day of consecutive protests calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak. (PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Last week it was “Departure Friday.” The protesters have dubbed today’s demonstrations “Farewell Friday.” At around 2 am my time (10 am in Cairo), an Al Jazeera English reporter observed that Liberation Square has become unusually full already for morning time. She said that it’s usually around or after prayers that the crowds got to these numbers before. Egyptian military leaders have met and are supposed to be issuing a statement (“Communique 2″), but one of the Al Jazeera commentators I was just listening to a short while ago characterized this development as a sham. Here is some of the latest from the AJ Live Blog:

9:51am An army officer joining protests in Cairo’s Tahrir Square says 15 other middle-ranking officers have also gone over to the demonstrators.

“The armed forces’ solidarity movement with the people has begun,” Major Ahmed Ali Shouman tells Reuters.

I’m trying to get more insight on what exactly that means. I’m not hearing anything about it on the AJE feed.

Here’s the Reuters article.

UPDATES

(in reverse chronological order, so latest is first)

4 am/noon Cairo: Midday prayers are under way. AJE also saying protesters are calling this “the Final Friday.” We’ll see about that. I have to say that from what I can make out, this is panning out according to prediction of the AJE commentator who said that the military meeting and issuing a statement would be a sham (his exact words were that it sounded like a “fake” to him). Dakinikat’s morning thread will be up at the top of the next hour. If there’s anything major that happens between now and then, I’ll add an update here… otherwise check the comments!

3:47 CST/11:47 Cairo: Military statement (Communique 2) is being read. Emergency law will end, but only once the current circumstances end. Free and fair elections, but no real specifics. Peaceful transition of power, restoring “normal life” and going back to work, etc. “Honest men who say no to corruption will not be prosecuted.” This is no military coup. AJE anchor characterized it as a “placatory statement” that amounts to “sitting on the fence.” Another AJE journalist is calling it the first signs of the army positioning itself, but it’s a “timid” positioning.

3:40 CST/11:40 am Cairo: Friday prayers are in about 20 minutes. Shouman said the other officers will address the protesters after midday prayers, and we’re also waiting on that statement from the military, so in the meantime, I’m going to quote a bit from that Reuters article above:

“The armed forces’ solidarity movement with the people has begun,” Major Ahmed Ali Shouman told Reuters by telephone just after dawn prayers.

On Thursday evening Shouman told crowds in Tahrir that he had handed in his weapon and joined their protests demanding an immediate end to President Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year rule.

“Some 15 officers … have joined the people’s revolution,” he said, listing their ranks ranging from captain to lieutenant colonel. “Our goals and the people’s are one.”

More:

Another army major walked up to Shouman while he was talking with a Reuters reporter in Tahrir on Thursday and introduced himself, saying: “I have also joined the cause.”

“What drove these officers and I to join the people’s revolution is the pledge of allegiance we all took upon joining the armed forces — to protect the nation,” Shouman said when asked whether officers were risking court-martial.

Protesters carried Shouman on their shoulders, chanting “The people and army are united”, after he spoke to them on stage.

This is a semi-live blog/developing thread. For more, see the Al Jazeera English LIVE feed (or AJE Live on youtube):


Late Night: A Little Levity

By CarlosLatuff:

(Cartoon) #Mubarak got the chair, Egyptian people got the POWER! #Jan25 #Egypt

This is from Jon Stewart last week, but since we’re living a Groundhog’s day nightmare with both Mubarak and Fox News, this is still entirely applicable to today (H/T Minkoff Minx):

And, because I still prefer Stephen Colbert over Stewart (sorry Jon)… another clip from last week, again not all that much has changed:

This is a late night open thread. Do your thing in the comments!


Mubarak’s “I am not Crook Speech”: He’s not going anywhere

Well, this is interesting.  It seems that Al Ariabia got it right and every one else–including the Public face of our

Not going anywhere, not gonna do it, wouldn't be prudent at this juncture

CIA–was wrong. Mubarak says he’s going to be a figurehead and the Torture VP is going to do the official duties.

Live Blog from UK GUARDIAN here:

9.02pm GMT: No one in Tahrir Square is listening to the rest of the Mubarak speech. The chant is: “Get out, get out.”

“We will be dignified until the very end, may God preserve Egypt, may peace be upon you,” is Mubarak’s final remark.

No sign he’s leaving. The “I have been ignoring international pressure” line suggests this was a “I fight on” speech by Mubarak.

9pm GMT: Mubarak’s not stepping down, that much seems clear, although exactly what that means with his previous statements about the army implementing change isn’t clear.

Tahrir Square is going nuts, based on the live footage.

8.58pm GMT: “I have spent most of my life in defence of our homeland,” says Mubarak. “I have never succumbed to any international pressure…. I have my dignity intact.”

So he’s not stepping down, it seems.

8.53pm GMT: Mubarak says he’s asked for the amendment of articles 76, 77, 88, 93 and 181 of the constitution, and abolishing the controversial article 179.

Article 179 is the emergency law that has been a huge issue and a major demand of the protesters. The rest involve the powers and terms of the presidency but we’ll get more details later.

8.51pm GMT: Mentions that the reforms will be “implemented by our armed forces,” and on-going dialogue.

Talking about a “national dialogue” and a “road map that is very clear on a specific timetable … until September,” but follows this by talking about the various committees he has had set up.

I’m not sure more committees are going to cut it right now in Tahrir Square.

8.50pm GMT: Mubarak speaking: talking of a “smooth transition of powers” but not much detail yet.

8.49pm GMT: Mubarak reaffirms that he’s not standing for election as president and that power will be transfered to “whoever the electorate chooses in the new fair and square elections”.

8.48pm GMT: Mubarak speaking: mistakes were made, he says.

I can tell you that I as the president of the Republic I have to respond to your calls but I am also embarrassed, and I will not accept or listen to any foreign interventions.

8.46pm GMT Mubarak now speaking on state television.

I can tell you before anything else that the blood of your martyrs will not be wasted and that I will not be easy on punishing people who committed these crimes.

Says he will “respond to your demands and your voices” and carry our promises.

Is this an appeal to Egyptian people watching him from their sofas in their living rooms?  He still seems to think that the protesters are still foreign agents and upset young people.  What does he see as the difference between ‘delegating’ power and remaining in power?

President Hosni Mubarak addressed an expectant Egypt on Thursday, saying that he had delegated his powers to his vice president, Omar Suleiman, but would not leave the country,  according to NBC News translation.

Saying he was addressing Egypt’s youth and people in Tahrir Square and the nation, he said he believed in the honesty of the demands of the protesters and their intentions.

“I am addressing from the heart,” he said. “The blood of the martyrs and injured will not go in vain … My heart aches for your heartache.”