New Years Eve: Pre-Drop Open Thread

Hey, y’all!

Tonight we watch the ball descend, the peach fall, the possum drop…oh wait, that celebration had the kibosh put on it, however…there very well may be a roadkill drop. 

Anyway, tonight we watch all sorts of things dropping, signifying the end of year 2012, and the beginning of 2013.

Where to ring in 2013 – CBS News

Personally, I think the most significant thing that should be dropping is the American Public’s drawers…as in pants, because to ring in this new year we all need to get ready for the screw job that is coming.

So, as we wait for 2013 to make its grand entrance, I bring you some links to pass the time. Of course, most of these links are list…go figure.

Gregory Linton: The Best of Los Angeles Street Art 2012 (PHOTOS)

Street artist Chod paints over a dollar bill. Notice the little features, such as how the middle monkey’s nostrils double as George Washington’s masked eyes. This modified dollar bill was found glued to a red street curb in Hollywood.

More cool ass street art here: 10 Photos of Incredible Street Art –

Here are a couple of my favorites.

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The webs are crocheted in a colorful spiderweb pattern around what would usually be a very ordinary tree. The purpose of yarn bombing is to brighten up the world by crocheting patterns onto things like statues, pipes and even tanks. It certainly fulfilled its purpose here.

Lovely? Well take a look at this one:

“No brushes or stencils, just spray”

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This amazing picture is by David Walker, and as the title suggests, he did not use any brushes or stencils. This is very unusual for a street artist to do, mostly because it is so difficult. The girl is made up of vibrant colors, while still remaining amazingly realistic – making the overall effect quite incredible.

More artwork from David Walker can by found here: artofdavidwalker

For Boston Boomer and Beata…and any other “Hoosiers” out there: Photos: Hoops Hysteria, Indiana Style

Earlier this year, photographer Elijah Hurwitz set out to capture Indiana basketball in places “where it offers a way out of boredom or a way out of town. Where it offers a way to build bonds and rivalries. And often, where it’s simply a way to pass the time when there’s nothing else to do.” In his rich, intimate shots of driveway pickup, prison ball, and the state’s intensely loyal fanbase, Hurwitz illustrates the state’s hoops passion, which he first experienced as an undergraduate at Indiana University. As it happens, this year’s Hoosiers have returned to their place among the nation’s top programs, reaching No. 1 for the first time in 20 years—and giving a new generation of Indianans a team to emulate and obsess over for years to come.

On to more list associated with the year 2012:

In 2012, 11 billion-dollar weather disasters in US | Earth | EarthSky

Two most expensive 2012 U.S. weather disasters have been ongoing drought ($40 billion in damages so far) and Superstorm Sandy ($62 billion so far).

These next two links are opposites of each other:

The 24 Best Moments For Women In 2012: including epic accomplishments in politics, sports, business and culture and advances in marriage equality.

2012′s War on Women :This year featured attacks on everything from contraception to the definition of rape.

For the book readers: Sean Carman: Yet Another Year-End List

David Gutowski, the writer and editor of Largehearted Boy, annually compiles a list of all of the lists of the best books of the year. As of this writing, Gutowski’s list of lists includes 60 lists starting with the letter “A.” Assuming the same number of lists start with each of the other letters, excluding V, W, X, Y, and Z, there are 1200 lists on Gutowski’s list of best book lists.

The mother of all best books lists begs this question: Do we really need one more?

Hell, best book list are fun…at least for me, but here are more list for you to enjoy.

For those with a literary bent, how about a list of Dear John letters from famous authors: h/t the Dish…  ‘This Was Like Dating a Priest’: For literary geniuses, there’s no such thing as a simple “It’s not you, it’s me.” Famous Authors’ Breakup Letters – Emily Temple – The Atlantic

And let us not forget a list for lexicographers: Goodbye ‘chillaxing,’ hello ‘omnishambles’: the phrases that fell in and out of fashion this year | The Raw Story

For those who are more numbers oriented: By the Numbers: Comparing Spending by Gun Rights and Gun Control Interest Groups – ProPublica

Let’s see, we’ve taken care of list for artist, writers, readers, Hoosier’s, and numbers freaks…now just a few links that aren’t list of things, they are simply easy-going fun articles and drawings to share.

(Okay, actually this first one is not “fun” but I thought it was damn good. Perhaps it should be placed under the War on Women list?)

Since all this talk of going off the fiscal cliff, lots of folks are using imagery of a very important film for me, and I am guessing for lots of women who are survivors of rape. Leave Thelma & Louise Alone – Garance Franke-Ruta – The Atlantic

All you people trying to yoke the 1991 feminist movie to the fiscal cliff negotiations seem to have forgotten that it’s a vigilante fantasy about rape culture which ends badly.

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How’s this for cultural amnesia: Politico‘s Jonathan Allen wrote this morning of fiscal cliff negotiations: “If they go over the cliff, they’ll do it together. But it won’t be some happy Thelma-and-Louise-style climax.”

Happy?

Has anyone actually watched Thelma & Louise lately?

No, I am guessing they haven’t.

Fun with art: EATEN BY DUCKS

Just go look at that one…trust me!

Alright, check this out…very cool indeed h/t Susie at C&L:

Chemistry of snowflakes, to neuroscience legacies:

Levi-Montalcini, A Giant of Neuroscience Leaves a Living Legacy | Talking back, Scientific American Blog Network

What may have been Rita Levi-Montalcini’s last paper was published almost a year ago in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. By no means a retrospective of a career that produced a Nobel Prize, the paper (“Nerve growth factor regulates axial rotation during early stages of chick embryo development”) added still one more bit of knowledge about the protein involved with  the growth and survival of nerve cells, a molecule that was Levi-Montalcini’s passion for 60 years.

Until her death on Sunday in Rome  at 103, Levi-Montalcini had been the oldest living Nobelist and a woman who had never let anything stop her from pursuing a destiny as a scientist.  The barriers were sometimes formidable. First there was her father, who discouraged her from becoming a physician but later provided support. Later the Nazis threatened—she set up a makeshift lab in her wartime hideout—and then finally came the confrontation with the inexorability of aging. The New York Times obit included this 2009 quotation: “At 100, I have a mind that is superior — thanks to experience — than when I was 20.”

Isn’t it wonderful that she was sharp up to the end?

Alright, I wanted to have a little something for everyone in this post, and I think I’ve succeeded.

Have a wonderful and safe New Years Eve!

This is an open thread.