Friday Nite Lite: Oh Boy, Not Again!

Evening!

Hey, well here’s a few cartoons, my internet is worse than ever…

Signe Wilkinson: Freedoms – Signe Wilkinson – Truthdig

 

 

Clay Bennett: Paramedic – Clay Bennett – Truthdig

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Pat Bagley, Salt Lake Tribune – 09/11/2014

Cartoon by Pat Bagley -

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by MStreeter, Savannah Morning News – 09/12/2014

Cartoon by MStreeter -

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by John R. Rose, Byrd Newspapers of Virginia – 09/12/2014

Cartoon by John R. Rose -

 

9.11.2014 – Political Cartoon by Deb Milbrath, Cartoon Movement – 09/11/2014

Cartoon by Deb Milbrath - 9.11.2014

 

Going Down – Political Cartoon by Tim Campbell, Current Publishing – 09/11/2014

Cartoon by Tim Campbell - Going Down

 

This is an open thread.

 


Live Blog: President Obama’s Speech on Dealing with Islamic State Militants

In this image made through a window of the Oval Office, President Obama speaks on the phone to Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah on Wednesday (NPR)

In this image made through a window of the Oval Office, President Obama speaks on the phone to Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah on Wednesday (NPR)

President Obama will give a prime-time speech at 9:00 tonight in which he will lay out a strategy to deal with the Islamic State Militants in Iraq and Syria. Let’s watch the speech together and discuss on what the President says in real time. I’ve gathered some links to articles that report on and react to the leaked content of the speech.

According to The Washington Post, Obama will announce a ‘broad coalition’ to fight the Islamic State terror group.

The United States will lead a “broad coalition” to defeat the Islamic State through air strikes and support for military partners on the ground, President Obama will announce Wednesday night….Obama will tell the country that the offensive against the militant group will not involve combat troops, but rather a “steady, relentless effort” that involves air power and backing for partner forces, according to early excerpts provided by the White House.

“So tonight, with a new Iraqi government in place, and following consultations with allies abroad and Congress at home, I can announce that America will lead a broad coalition to roll back this terrorist threat. Our objective is clear: we will degrade, and ultimately destroy ISIL through a comprehensive and sustained counter-terrorism strategy,” Obama will say, using an acronym for the Islamic State terrorist group.

Obama will make clear to a war-weary public that the offensive will not resemble the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, but rather other, more covert, missions against terrorists.

“I want the American people to understand how this effort will be different from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. It will not involve American combat troops fighting on foreign soil,” Obama will tell the nation.

“This counter-terrorism campaign will be waged through a steady, relentless effort to take out ISIL wherever they exist using our air power and our support for partner forces on the ground. This strategy of taking out terrorists who threaten us, while supporting partners on the front lines, is one that we have successfully pursued in Yemen and Somalia for years.”

Frankly, I’m very worried about this. I really don’t see how this is going to end well. I hope I’m wrong.

Richard Engel writes at NBC News, What Happens After the U.S. Bombs ISIS?

On one level, bombing ISIS is easy. The U.S. knows where the group operates. There’s no need for a ten-year hunt like the one for Osama bin Laden. The terror group has two capital cities, Mosul in Iraq and Raqqa in Syria. Al-Qaeda never had such an obvious home address.

Finding a justification to attack ISIS is also simple. It has threatened to carry out another 9/11, beheaded two American journalists, slaughtered thousands of Iraqis and Syrians and is a danger to U.S. allies in the region. Many in the U.S. military believe ISIS needs to be immediately, and repeatedly, smashed by American drones and warplanes.

But what then happens to the Middle East – this seething cauldron of competing interests, religious passions, ethnic tensions, long memories and oil? The key question now, as before the Iraq invasion, is what happens after the U.S. starts bombing.

ISIS controls a territory roughly the size of Maryland where 8 million people live. If it’s attacked and toppled, who will fill the void? In Iraq, it will be the Kurdish fighters or the Iraqi army. The two don’t trust each other and have different objectives for the territory they control. The Kurds are laying the foundation for a future independent state. The Iraqi army is increasingly an Iranian-guided, Shiite force.

The U.S. spent billions of dollars to build a secular, professional national Iraqi army but failed because, despite all the U.S.-supplied guns, tanks and planes, the Iraqi military fell apart when challenged by a band of terrorists. President Obama wants to reconstitute it now as part of his ISIS strategy. Why would it work this time when it didn’t before, even as U.S. troops were standing next to Iraqi soldiers in Baghdad, shoulder to shoulder?

Good questions. Read more at the link.

From the LA Times, Obama to call for ‘steady, relentless’ effort against Islamic State.

Nearly six years after he was elected on the promise to end America’s decade of wars, Obama planned to detail a military campaign that is broader and more complex than any he has launched during his tenure.

Obama is expected to expand U.S. airstrikes against the militants in Iraq to include targets throughout the country as well as across the rapidly disintegrating border with Syria, where the group harbors its weapons, camps and fighters.

White House officials say Obama also plans to further train and arm Iraqi and Kurdish troops as well as opposition forces battling the Islamic State in Syria. He’ll tout beefed-up partnerships with governments in the Middle East and Western allies, who have been asked to assist in the training, gather intelligence and counter the Islamic State’s appeal in the broader Muslim world.

In his televised remarks, Obama was to describe the effort as a “broad coalition to roll back this terrorist threat.”

“Our objective is clear: We will degrade, and ultimately destroy, ISIL through a comprehensive and sustained counter-terrorism strategy,” according to prepared remarks released by the White House, referring to the Islamic State by a commonly used abbreviation.

Those article spell out the gist of what the President will say. Here are a few more links to peruse if you want more.

Reuters, Bill to fund U.S. government ensnared in debate about Islamic State.

LA Times, Cheney urges Obama to launch ‘immediate’ assault on Islamic State (Sigh . . . why won’t he go away?)

Foreign Policy, There are already troops in Iraq. Problem is, they’re Iranian.

The New York Times, What Obama Faces in a Campaign Against ISIS.

Please us know what you think of the speech in the comment thread. Watch the live stream at CNN here and at the LA Times with live updating here.

 


Sunday Reads: Cartoons

Good Morning

The internet has been giving me problems again, so let’s see if this works…I’ll post some cartoons and keep this an open thread.

Criminal Governor – Truthdig

Clay Bennett editorial cartoon – Political Cartoon by Clay Bennett, Chattanooga Times Free Press – 09/06/2014

Cartoon by Clay Bennett - Clay Bennett editorial cartoon

Bullets and Burgers – Political Cartoon by Adam Zyglis, The Buffalo News – 09/06/2014

Cartoon by Adam Zyglis - Bullets and Burgers

Joan’s final gig by Political Cartoonist Peter Lewis

153318 600 Joans final gig cartoons

Digital Privacy – Truthdig

Clay Bennett: Islamic State Cancer – Clay Bennett – Truthdig

 

Putins Dream of Empire by Political Cartoonist Martin Kozlowski

153298 600 Putins Dream of Empire cartoons

Joan Rivers by Political Cartoonist Randall Enos

153297 600 Joan Rivers cartoons

 

Joan Rivers by Political Cartoonist John Darkow

153278 600 Joan Rivers cartoons

Former Virginia Governor McDonnell the Crook by Political Cartoonist Bill Day

153276 600 Former Virginia Governor McDonnell the Crook cartoons

 

Nick Anderson: BP Ruling – Nick Anderson – Truthdig

 

Jennifer Lawrence and Apple iCloud by Political Cartoonist Taylor Jones

153250 600 Jennifer Lawrence and Apple iCloud cartoons

Putin Strategy by Political Cartoonist Arend van Dam

153255 600 Putin Strategy cartoons

Joan Rivers obit by Political Cartoonist Jimmy Margulies

153223 600 Joan Rivers obit cartoons

Joan Rivers 1933 2014 by Political Cartoonist Taylor Jones

153226 600 Joan Rivers 1933 2014 cartoons

 

Joan Rivers by Political Cartoonist David Fitzsimmons

153227 600 Joan Rivers cartoons

 

Tin Man – Political Cartoon by Rob Rogers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – 09/05/2014

Cartoon by Rob Rogers - Tin Man

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Gustavo Rodriguez, El Nuevo Herald – 09/05/2014

Cartoon by Gustavo Rodriguez -

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Joe Heller, Green Bay Press-Gazette – 09/05/2014

Cartoon by Joe Heller -

Clay Bennett editorial cartoon – Political Cartoon by Clay Bennett, Chattanooga Times Free Press – 09/05/2014

Cartoon by Clay Bennett - Clay Bennett editorial cartoon

 

Duck Dynasty Jihad – Political Cartoon by J.D. Crowe, Alabama Media Group – 09/05/2014

Cartoon by J.D. Crowe - Duck Dynasty Jihad

RIP JOAN RIVERS – Political Cartoon by Deb Milbrath, Cartoon Movement – 09/05/2014

Cartoon by Deb Milbrath - RIP JOAN RIVERS

 

Kids and Guns by Political Cartoonist Randall Enos

153008 600 Kids and Guns cartoons

 

Dressed To Kill by Political Cartoonist Paul Zanetti153009 600 Dressed To Kill cartoons

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by John Cole, Scranton Times/Tribune – 08/31/2014

Cartoon by John Cole -

9/5 Luckovich cartoon: Wing Lift | Mike Luckovich

lk090514_color

 

 

 

And…..this is an open thread.


Friday Nite Lite: Goodbye August

Evening All!

Tonight we have a lot of cartoons dealing with kids and guns. So here we go…and in random order:

NRA Kids and Uzis by Political Cartoonist Dave Granlund

152959 600 NRA Kids and Uzis cartoons

AAEC – Political Cartoon by David Horsey, Los Angeles Times – 08/29/2014

Cartoon by David Horsey -

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Pat Bagley, Salt Lake Tribune – 08/29/2014

Cartoon by Pat Bagley -

 

Global Warming Treaty by Political Cartoonist Rick McKee

152931 600 Global Warming Treaty cartoons

Market Basket finish line by Political Cartoonist Dave Granlund

152937 600 Market Basket finish line cartoons

Hating Obama – Political Cartoon by Rob Rogers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – 08/28/2014

Cartoon by Rob Rogers - Hating Obama

 

More gun madness by Political Cartoonist Taylor Jones

152910 600 More gun madness cartoons

 

Ray Rice and Josh Gordon Suspensions by Political Cartoonist Jeff Darcy

152884 600 Ray Rice and Josh Gordon Suspensions cartoons

 

ferguson by Political Cartoonist David Fitzsimmons

152837 600 ferguson cartoons

 

Signe Wilkinson: Beef Race – Signe Wilkinson – Truthdig

 

This is an open thread.


Friday Nite Lite: Ferguson and more…

Good Evening

 

Mayberry 2014 by Political Cartoonist Mike Luckovich

152525 600 Mayberry 2014 cartoons

 

Oh, there is a shitload for you tonight.

(In no particular order.)

 

 

 

 

 

Ferguson Wave by Political Cartoonist Daryl Cagle

152660 600 Ferguson Wave cartoons

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Paul Fell, Artizans Syndicate – 08/22/2014

Cartoon by Paul Fell -

 

Barney’s Tank – Political Cartoon by Rob Rogers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – 08/22/2014

Cartoon by Rob Rogers - Barney's Tank

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by MStreeter, Savannah Morning News – 08/22/2014

Cartoon by MStreeter -

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by David Horsey, Los Angeles Times – 08/22/2014

Cartoon by David Horsey -

 

Iraq Lesson Not Learned – Truthdig

 

New Sunrise – Political Cartoon by Ed Hall, Artizans Syndicate – 08/22/2014

Cartoon by Ed Hall - New Sunrise

Mike Luckovich: Ice Bucket Challenge Gone Wrong – Mike Luckovich – Truthdig

 

Clay Bennett: Perry – Truthdig

 

Obama Vacations and Coffee Breaks by Political Cartoonist Monte Wolverton

152551 600 Obama Vacations and Coffee Breaks cartoons

 

Ferguson a moment’s pause by Political Cartoonist Taylor Jones

152555 600 Ferguson   a moments pause cartoons

 

Ferguson Autopsy Report by Political Cartoonist Jeff Darcy

152561 600 Ferguson Autopsy Report cartoons

 

Could Be Worse – Political Cartoon by Ed Hall, Artizans Syndicate – 08/20/2014

Cartoon by Ed Hall - Could Be Worse

Little League phenom Mo’ne Davis by Political Cartoonist Taylor Jones

152501 600 Little League phenom Mone Davis cartoons

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by David Horsey, Los Angeles Times – 08/19/2014

Cartoon by David Horsey -

 

Miranda Rights – Political Cartoon by Rob Rogers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – 08/19/2014

Cartoon by Rob Rogers - Miranda Rights

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Paul Fell, Artizans Syndicate – 08/19/2014

Cartoon by Paul Fell -

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Jimmy Margulies

Cartoon by Jimmy Margulies -

 

Heaven’s Back Gate – Political Cartoon by Steve Artley, Artleytoons – 08/19/2014

Cartoon by Steve Artley - Heaven's Back Gate

AAEC – Political Cartoon by MStreeter, Savannah Morning News – 08/19/2014

Cartoon by MStreeter -

Bus Ride – Political Cartoon by Tim Campbell, Current Publishing – 08/19/2014

Cartoon by Tim Campbell - Bus Ride

Beware The Alpha Parents – Political Cartoon by Paul Combs, Tribune Media Services – 08/19/2014

Cartoon by Paul Combs - Beware The Alpha Parents

 

Ferguson and race in America by Political Cartoonist Patrick Chappatte

152527 600 Ferguson and race in America cartoons

Ferguson Police by Political Cartoonist Steve Sack

152537 600 Ferguson Police cartoons

 

Clay Bennett: Equal Justice – Clay Bennett – Truthdig

 

Ferguson Keystone Cops by Political Cartoonist Rick McKee

152546 600 Ferguson Keystone Cops cartoons

 

HANDS UP! DON’T SHOOT! – Political Cartoon by David G. Brown, Los Angeles Sentinel – 08/17/2014

Cartoon by David G. Brown - HANDS UP! DON'T SHOOT!

AAEC – Political Cartoon by John Cole, Scranton Times/Tribune – 08/17/2014

Cartoon by John Cole -

Militarized – Political Cartoon by Rob Rogers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – 08/17/2014

Cartoon by Rob Rogers - Militarized

 

Radioactive Kids – Political Cartoon by Rob Rogers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – 07/27/2014

Cartoon by Rob Rogers - Radioactive Kids

 

Ferguson Exit by Political Cartoonist Steve Sack152650 600 Ferguson Exit cartoons

 

This is an open thread.

 

 


Blue Monday Morning Reads

BMTapestryGood Morning!

I have to admit that it’s getting tough to face the news these days.  I am having one of the years where everything I own has decided to break down.  It started last Labor Day with the AC unit outside and has moved on to my computer, me, two of my pets, the vacuum cleaner, my car’s brakes, and the refrigerator.

I’m having a really difficult time paying for all of these as well as dealing with the usual grief of running around trying to get it all fixed.  Most of this stuff is not the sort of thing that can wait which is the most depressing news.  Is it just me or is everything designed to completely break down within a fairly short time?

I’ve ranted quite a few times here about the consolidation of all kinds of industries in this country from banking to media to anything having to do with natural resources.  There’s a new book out from Barry Lynn called “Cornered: The New Monopoly Capitalism and the Economics of Destruction” that provides some fairly good information on the consequences of market consolidation.

Lynn Parramore: What are some of the telltale signs of monopolies?

Barry Lynn: Well, monopoly doesn’t mean that a company controls 100 percent of the marketplace. What monopoly means is that a company has sufficient control of the market to shape the outcomes of that market to its own advantage — to shape pricing, to determine who is making deals of with whom.

So what we have in America is that there are actually very few marketplaces in which you have a single company that has complete, 100 percent control. But what you do have is many marketplaces, thousands of markets, in which you have a dominant player that really controls commerce in that activity.

A really good sign, the thing you’ll actually tend to see in a newspaper or on TV is the merger, a big deal, two companies coming together. And most of the time, the press will cover it as, well, here’s an opportunity to invest. Or here’s a company that you should be looking at in the future. But what you’re actually seeing in many cases is the creation of power or the increasing power of a particular corporation over a particular marketplace.

LP: For the average person, how do monopolies affect our lives, prevent us from getting and doing the things we need?

BL: Monopolies affect us in innumerable ways. The most obvious way, the way that people always talked about, is that monopolies usually have the power to raise the price in some activity, for some good, for some service. We see that, say, with Comcast and cable services. But monopolists also have the capacity to reduce our liberties.

As workers, one of the things you prize is an open market where you can sell your work to many potential buyers, many potential employers. If there’s a lot of consolidation nationally in your industry, or even your town, you may find yourself with really only one or two buyers for your work. That means that you have less ability to negotiate higher wages. It also means that you have less real freedom: you can’t just pick up and leave if you get a bad boss.

I watched a program about a new movie starring Meryl Streep and Jeff Bridges based on the book “The Giver” this weekend. It’s yet another take on a2004011700140201 dystopian future but it sounds quite interesting and the casting is super.  Here’s a piece in The Atlantic over the movie and the idea of equality/inequality which is central to the theme of the book and movie.

The world is an increasingly unequal and unfair place, economists tell us. Every year, it becomes a little harder to picture what equal opportunity and egalitarianism even look like. As the rich attract capital like Jupiter attracts space debris and the poor fail to make any substantial gains, the gap between them comes to seem to us less surmountable, more of a force of nature than something for which we can even imagine a reasonable counterfactual.

Fortunately, we have literature to help us out with that.

Specifically, we have young adult literature, and its fascination with the way that the world is made, unmade, and remade.

If you grew up in the 1980s or 1990s and were of a bookish turn, you either readThe Giver or had it read to you, despite the numerous times that moral hawks tried to keep it out of your hands. (Naturally, this only made it more attractive.) The book, and numerous others that followed it, imagined worlds where economic conditions dictate the facts of human life, as of course they have a tendency to do.

* * *

In The Giver, society has “solved” inequality by dramatically reducing personal property and having the state distribute what’s left. (This is not the sort of solution that might be recommended by a moderate market skeptic, like Capital in the Twenty-First Century’s author Thomas Piketty. His proposal—raising the income tax or making it more progressive—wouldn’t make for the most exciting subject, especially for young-adult page turners.) Such a solution like The Giver‘s has a stellar literary pedigree: It harkens back to thinkers like Thomas More, who in 1516 invented the egalitarian no-place (“utopia”), and to the socialist philosophers of the 19th century, especially Friedrich Engels.

Engels saw the institutions of family and private property as deeply entwined. Part of Engels’ objection to the institution of the family was that it involved a “progressive narrowing of the circle, originally embracing the whole tribe, within which the two sexes have a common conjugal relation.” Marxism’s benevolent tendencies are swallowed up by concern and preference for one’s immediate family, which becomes the unit of basic inequality.

Like Engels and Marx, Piketty and his contemporaries worry about “patrimonial capitalism,” or the tendency for certain families to only become richer, because the rate of return on capital exceeds the ordinary rate of growth. Have more capital, get more growth, have more capital, get more growth, and so on.

But there’s another kind of patrimony, as everyone who has ever ended up doing the same thing as her parents knows. There is a real danger that inequality is not just related to literal capital accumulation, but to equality of opportunity and the accumulation of cultural capital. This might include things like what kind of education your family can afford to give you, but also could be as simple as what you see in front of you every day and the way that it either expands or limits your opportunities, your very knowledge of to what you can reasonably aspire.

Anyway, it seems worth viewing if only for the cast.  Streep plays the villain btw.

bskyb_image_187918_v1_child_with_dove_1901_1_400x240If there’s ever been an example of a post capitalist dream turned dystopia on earth, it has to be the city of Detroit.  It was once the center of our premier industry.  We haven’t mentioned the most recent development there.   The city is shutting off water service to many people.  That’s basically turning lives over to a less than third world living situation and it sets up a potential Health Crisis.  Thousands of families–including infants and the elderly– no longer have running water.

A new mass rally in Detroit is planned for Friday, August 29, the day the state-enforced city bankruptcy trial begins. Democracy activists throughout the Midwest are again urged to come demonstrate against the water shut-offs and the hostile takeover of Detroit’s assets.

In this period of mass despair over rampant political corruption and economic injustice in America, many people ask, “Does protest really make a difference?” The answer is yes, and it is being proven right now in Detroit, the frontline battleground in the growing resistance movement against the hostile corporate takeover and looting of American cities nationwide.

Detroit is the model for a nascent democracy mass movement. On July 18, thousands of demonstrators from around the country linked arms and marched in downtown Detroit, past the City Emergency Manager’s office and the JP Morgan Chase Bank, in a show of solidarity against the ongoing corporate-led assault on city worker’s pensions and most recently, the indiscriminate shut-off of water, without notice, to more than 15,000 families, mostly African American.

While businesses, large corporations and banks – 55 percent of which were in arrears on water bills – were exempted from the shut-offs, service to 40,000 homes was reportedly on the chopping block. Thousands had already been left without clean water, with no concern shown for infants and children, pregnant women, the sick, elderly or handicapped. Many Detroit activists and civic leaders, including Congressman John Conyers, attended the rally at Hart Plaza and decried the water shut-offs as a human rights violation and a public health crisis.

As one prominent sign at the front of the rally stated, “WHERE DO YOU EXPECT US TO SH*T?”

On the same morning that the protest rally exploded, civil disobedience was used to block private company trucks performing the shut-offs from leaving their garage. Nine activists were arrested, including three clergy members and Baxter Jones, an activist with a disability who uses a wheelchair for mobility. Pastor Bill Wylie-Kellermann stated after his arrest: “Detroit is under assault by lawless and illegitimate authority. It’s a moral issue. As religious leaders and allies, we are upping the ante, spiritually and politically, by putting our bodies in the way. We pray to intensify the struggle with civil disobedience, even as it is broadened with mass action and legal challenge. As one of our fallen mentors Charity Hicks urged, we are seeking to ‘wage love’ in the face of death. Such deeds can sometimes break the dreadful silence of our occupied corporate media.”

The protest actions, following an admonition from the United Nations that Detroit’s water shut-off was indeed a human rights violation, embarrassed both Governor Rick Snyder and his appointed “Emergency Manager,” Kevin Orr. Within three days, Orr announced a 15-day moratorium of the shut-offs; a respite later extended to August 24. Soon after, Orr relinquished administration of the Water Department to the city.

The demonstrations may ultimately serve to deter a planned privatization of the city’s water system: a Detroit asset estimated to be worth many billions of dollars that sits adjacent to 21 percent of the world’s freshwater supply in the Great Lakes.

Also clearly irritated by the attention on the shut-offs was Federal Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes, who demanded an explanation from the city, stating that the water issue was hurting Detroit’s reputation in the world community. The mass actions turned a powerful national spotlight on Detroit’s controversial bankruptcy, including full coverage of the resulting water war on major TV and cable networks, and in printed press ranging from the Detroit Free Press to the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Detroit activists “felt the love” as the media and internet were lit up and news of the protests went viral; thousands of blogs and social media communications spread the word, and within days, perhaps millions became aware of Detroit’s crisis. The coverage illuminated the role of criminal banks and real estate moguls, as well as the attacks on pension funds and attempted privatization of the water system.

Overnight, this local crisis emerged as an example of the national “shock doctrine” strategy being spread like a plague by the Tea Party and ALEC; exposing their “emergency management” laws as facilitating a strategy to undermine democracy and pave the path for surreptitious privatization of public assets.

The rally shed light on the complicity of the major Wall Street banks in Detroit’s economic spiral, banks whose investors continue to thrive while Main Street takes the brunt of the financial losses they caused. “Detroit is just the canary in the mine” was a refrain often repeated by the rally speakers.

van_gogh-iris-1890So, this is turning into quite the serious post.  But, like I said, this just seems to be one of those moon or solar phases, I guess.  Amnesty International is on the ground in Ferguson.  It’s the first time they’ve ever deployed in the USA.

Amnesty International has taken “unprecedented” action to deal with the situation in Ferguson, Missouri, by sending resources the human rights group has never deployed inside the United States.

The organization has been on the ground in Ferguson since Thursday, sending a 13-person human rights delegation to the city in the wake of the Aug. 9 police shooting death of Michael Brown.

Jasmine Heiss, a senior campaigner with Amnesty who is a part of the team in Ferguson, said the use of the “cross-functional team” — which she said included community trainers, researchers, and human rights observers — was “unprecedented” within the United States for the group.

On Saturday, after Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency and put a curfew in place in Ferguson, Amnesty International USA’s executive director, Steven W. Hawkins, issued a scathing statement.

“We criticize dictators for quelling dissent and silencing protestors with tactics like curfews, we’ll certainly speak out when it’s happening in our own backyard,” he said. “The people of Ferguson have the right to protest peacefully the lack of accountability for Michael Brown’s shooting.”

I’m ending with the results of Michael Brown’s private autopsy which was released last evening. Brown was shot at least 6 times and twice in the head Blue_Lovers_Marc_Chagallwhich is  interesting given that he was 6’4″.  Eric Holder has ordered an autopsy as part of the Federal investigation.  Governor Nixon held court in the Sunday Shows.  I have to admit that I left the TV off all day.  There’s only so much one old lady can take. 

Nixon called St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch, an “experienced prosecutor.” Nixon said he had no timetable for the investigation.

Nixon also told ABC’s “This Week With George Stephanopoulos” that his office was unaware that Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson was going to release on Friday a videotape showing what is alleged to be Brown, 18, in what police have called a “strong-armed” robbery of cigars in a convenience store shortly before he was killed.

“Rest assured we have had very serious discussions about that action” and its effect on Brown’s family, Nixon told NBC’s “Meet the Press.” — Chuck Raasch, 10:30 a.m. Sunday

So, the Governor has no problem with the prosecutor.  That’s interesting too.

So, I’m going to end it here. What’s on your reading and blogging list today? 


Friday Nite Lite: Perry Indicted…For Abuse of Power

Bwaaahhhhaaah!!!!

Texas Gov. Perry Indicted on Charge of Abuse of Power

Now for the funnies…

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Ted Rall, Universal Press Syndicate – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by Ted Rall -

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by MStreeter, Savannah Morning News – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by MStreeter -

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Scott Stantis, Chicago Tribune – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by Scott Stantis -

 

Clay Bennett editorial cartoon – Political Cartoon by Clay Bennett, Chattanooga Times Free Press – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by Clay Bennett - Clay Bennett editorial cartoon

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Pat Bagley, Salt Lake Tribune – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by Pat Bagley -

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Pat Bagley, Salt Lake Tribune – 08/14/2014

Cartoon by Pat Bagley -

 

War On Whites – Political Cartoon by Rob Rogers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – 08/14/2014

Cartoon by Rob Rogers - War On Whites

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Nick Anderson, Houston Chronicle – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by Nick Anderson -

 

Ferguson Fracas by Political Cartoonist Nate Beeler

152352 600 Ferguson Fracas cartoons

 

Pope visits South Korea by Political Cartoonist Jimmy Margulies

152349 600 Pope visits South Korea cartoons

Nick Anderson: Depression – Nick Anderson – Truthdig

No Boots on the Ground by Political Cartoonist Bruce Plante

152337 600 No Boots on the Ground cartoons

 

No Boots on the Ground by Political Cartoonist John Darkow

152334 600 No Boots on the Ground cartoons

 

U Fix by Political Cartoonist Mike Luckovich

152325 600 U Fix cartoons

 

Excessive – Political Cartoon by Ed Hall, Artizans Syndicate – 08/14/2014

Cartoon by Ed Hall - Excessive

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Charlie Daniel, Knoxville News Sentinel – 08/14/2014

 

Cartoon by Charlie Daniel -

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Randy Bish, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review – 08/12/2014

Cartoon by Randy Bish -

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Gustavo Rodriguez, El Nuevo Herald – 08/14/2014

 

Cartoon by Gustavo Rodriguez -

 

Clay Bennett: Coexist – Clay Bennett – Truthdig

 

 

Cops Kill Unarmed Black Male by Political Cartoonist Jimmy Margulies

 

152302 600 Cops Kill Unarmed Black Male cartoons

 

Trojan Putin by Political Cartoonist Steve Sack

152300 600 Trojan Putin cartoons

 

Ferguson MO shooting by Political Cartoonist Dave Granlund

152279 600 Ferguson MO shooting cartoons

 

Back to Iraq by Political Cartoonist Mike Keefe

152276 600 Back to Iraq cartoons

Deja vu all over again by Political Cartoonist Taylor Jones

152273 600 Deja vu all over again cartoons

 

Peace in the Middle East by Political Cartoonist Martyn Turner

152264 600 Peace in the Middle East cartoons

 

Artist Putin by Political Cartoonist Marian Kamensky

152263 600 Artist Putin cartoons

 

Police Assaults by Political Cartoonist Mike Luckovich

152260 600 Police Assaults cartoons

 

This is an open thread.