Happy Mother’s Day: Fun Day Reads

$(KGrHqZHJDgFCIGCUjt9BQqPnRYU)!~~60_3Good Afternoon

and

Happy Mother’s Day!

For this second half of our Sunday Reads, let’s take a look a variety of topics sandwiched between a couple of items about “Mutha’s Day.”

Anna Jarvis, The Founder of Mother’s Day Later Fought to Have It Abolished

Years after she founded Mother’s Day, Anna Jarvis was dining at the Tea Room at Wanamaker’s department store in Philadelphia. She saw they were offering a “Mother’s Day Salad.” She ordered the salad and when it was served, she stood up, dumped it on the floor, left the money to pay for it, and walked out in a huff. Jarvis had lost control of the holiday she helped create, and she was crushed by her belief that commercialism was destroying Mother’s Day.

Here is a little history of Anna Jarvis and Mother’s Day, in cartoon format, by Steve Brodner. Click on the cartoon to view larger image.

Anna Jarvis, the Radical Behind Mother’s Day | Mother Jones

Makes that “Mother’s Day Salad” protest in the Tea Room at Wanamaker’s department store in Philadelphia all the more symbolic doesn’t it?

In a story that you may have missed last week: University of Montana agrees to reform handling of rape cases | Reuters

The University of Montana has agreed to reform how it responds to rape accusations following a year-long investigation by two U.S. government agencies into complaints such cases were mishandled, federal authorities and the school said on Thursday.

The U.S. departments of justice and education had probed allegations the university failed to aggressively pursue sexual assault and harassment reports, several of which involved football players.

The inquiries stemmed from reports that women on campus had been subjected to unfair treatment that infringed on their civil rights and violated constitutional bans on gender-based discrimination.

“What is noteworthy about this announcement today is not the problems our investigation found at the university, but a shared commitment to the equality of women students and their safety,” Roy Austin, deputy assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s civil rights division, said in a statement.

Jocelyn Samuels, the division’s principal deputy assistant attorney general, told a news conference that the set of agreements would provide a blueprint for reform for other campuses across the country as they address the “all too common problem of sexual assault and harassment of students.”

Blueprint? I should hope so. But after all this is 2013 and we are talking blueprints when it comes to the “all too common problem of sexual assault and harassment of students.” Seriously? It seems like bullshit to me when the day before this story was published on Reuters, the State Department was dealing with the actual “Blueprints” to make 3-D printed guns.

State Department takes down blueprints for 3D-printable handgun | The Raw Story

The State Department on Thursday ordered the nonprofit Defense Distributed to remove blueprints for the world’s first 3D-printed gun from its website.

“All such data should be removed from public access, the letter says. That might be an impossible standard. But we’ll do our part to remove it from our servers,” Defense Distributed founder Cody Wilson told Forbes.

The department’s Office of Defense Trade Controls Compliance warned Wilson that posting the materials online could be a violation of export controls. The International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) prohibits weapons manufactures from exporting technical data to foreign persons without authorization from the State Department.

“This means that all such data should be removed from public access immediately,” the Office of Defense Trade Controls Compliance said.

[...]

The warning from the State Department came just days after Defense Distributed unveiled the blueprints for its plastic single-shot handgun, called the “Liberator.” The firearm can be created by anyone with the blueprints and access to a 3D printer. Defense Distributed also released nine other 3D-printable firearms components.

Well….I think I made my point.

Moving on now to this, Can You Generate Electricity From Plants? Science Says Yes | Geekosystem

Plants use energy from the Sun through photosynthesis, and humans use energy from the Sun through things like solar panels. A new technique created by researchers at the University of Georgia allows humans to get electricity from plants by hijacking the photosynthesis process. This research could someday lead to some very literal power plants.

Cool innit? Go to the link to check it out.

A few weeks ago, we lost a comic genius…Jonathan Winters. I have two articles written by Dick Cavett in the New York Times. Take a few minutes to read them when you can.

With Winters Gone, Can We Be Far Behind? – NYTimes.com

No more Jonathan Winters.

What did we do to deserve this?

I’m just antique enough to remember when Jonathan first hit. Or at least for me. It was the Jack Paar “Tonight Show” and no one had ever seen anything remotely like it.

A slightly chubby, amiable, Midwesternly looking man who could have been an accountant or a bus driver, nicely dressed in dark suit and tie, stepped out, a bit timorously, from behind the curtain and, on the spot and before our eyes, created a whole mad little world.

Missing: Jonathan Winters. Badly. – NYTimes.com

I remember once mentioning the name Jonathan Winters to Groucho Marx.

The reply: “There’s a giant talent.”

Now for some history links, this first one is more about something that is history in the making actually.  First black woman named to Ga. Civil War Commission

The first black woman has been appointed to serve on Georgia’s Civil War Commission.

House Speaker David Ralston on Friday selected Inger Eberhart for the post.

The Acworth resident currently serves on the staff of Cobb County Commissioner JoAnn Birrell. She is on the board of advisers of the Dustin Inman Society, which advocates for stricter enforcement of state and federal laws related to immigration.

Oh…that explains it.

Anyway, more history goodies, in link dump fashion:

Family album of Tsar Nicholas II resurfaces in museum exhibition

Held a virtual prisoner by the Bolsheviks months before his execution, Russia’s last Tsar Nicholas II pasted informal snapshots of his family into an album which has now come to light in a Russian provincial museum.

The photographs, most of which have never been seen before, show the last of the Romanov rulers of Russia without pomp and in unguarded moments. Many were taken by Nicholas II himself.

There are many informal photos…with penciled names and dates written on the backs.

History lessons the West refuses to learn

World View: After the Great War, Britain and France carved up the Middle East between them. Now, plans for Syria have the same potential for disaster.

A Political History of the Cicadas

The “Great East Coast Cicada Sex Invasion of 2013” is upon us.

After 17 years of feeding and living under the earth’s surface, billions of “Brood II” cicadas will emerge this summer between Connecticut and Georgia, swarming in thick, forbidding billows of shed exoskeletons and raucous insect lovemaking. (To get an idea of what the cicada mating call sounds like, click here for audio.)

For all their physical creepiness and loud public sex orgies, the (actually completely harmless) bugs have a rich cultural history in the United States. Bob Dylan wrote a song about the cicadas, for instance. But cicadas also have a rich political history in this country. Here are their greatest hits…

The Volokh Conspiracy » Irish Law at Kalamazoo

The 48th International Congress on Medieval Studies begins this Thursday on the campus of Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. I’m moderating a legal history panel on Thursday at 1:30, in Bernhard 106, called Law as Culture: Secular Punishment and Divine Retribution in Medieval Ireland (Panel 90). Here are the paper titles:

  • Beheading, Hanging, and Being Drawn Asunder: Execution in Medieval Ireland
  • Property Incursions and Punitive Irish Saints
  • Divine Diversion: Divine Retribution as Dispute Resolution and the Norman Invasion of Ireland

H/T to Delphyne for this one: The Medieval and Early Modern Meme Menagerie, or, Grumpy Cat is a Time Lord

I think we’ve finally found a proper Late Medieval or Early Modern Grumpy Cat.

GrumpyCats-SideBySide

…And, yes, Grumpy Cat is a Time Lord.

I actually love the expression on this little guy….

2. Maxwell, Disapproving Rabbit:

MemeMenagerie-DisapprovingRabbit

Even before someone discovered the “disapproval face,” Disapproving Rabbit was already fed up with your shit.

Oh, that is sooooooo true!

On to Movie news…

This next link is here because of two things… first, the movie that is mentioned is about Shanghai Kate, the woman who did two of my tattoos back in 1999 and 2000 in NYC. And second, it makes me think of when movies started to use video tape, we had VCRs and Blockbusters. Then it went to DVDs and we had NetFlix and RedBox.  Now it is Digital, we still have NetFlix but more and more companies are getting into the groove. Eventually we won’t have anything real to touch or feel…it will all be digital. And that kind of sucks.  Los Angeles startup Yekra nets $3M for its digital movie distribution platform

Disney is doing it again: Merida From ‘Brave’ Gets An Unnecessary Makeover, Sparks Change.org Petition (PHOTO)

Merida, “Brave’s” red-headed heroine will be crowned Disney’s 11th princess on May 11. And just in time for her royal induction, the animated character has received a head-to-toe makeover — she’s thinner, her eyes are wider and … Is that miracle anti-frizz solution she’s using? What is going on!?

merida makeover

New Merida, left. Original Merida, right.

Last night, my kids went to see The Great Gatsby with a bunch of their friends. When they came back home after the show, I asked my daughter what she thought of the movie…this was her response.

It was okay, but there was like…no story to it?

Well, that about says it all, doesn’t it.

She laughed and said that when they first walked into the theater there was nothing but “old people” there, and she and her friends were worried that they may have made a mistake by going to see the movie in the first place.

‘Unfilmable’ novels? No such thing, says Hollywood

“As I watched the trailer, I thought, ‘This is for 16-year-olds,’ ” she says. “All of this is about gearing this toward high school and college students who may not have any notion of who Fitzgerald was or what the book actually was.

“They’re not going to care too much about whether this is a well-done adaptation,” she adds. “They’re going to care about whether it’s a Hollywood blockbuster.”

Read the article I linked to, that quote is the last two sentences of the piece, but it fit so well with what my daughter said that I had to put it in here.  She also said the music sucked, and my son said the entire thing was crap…well, except for the film quality. He said it was a very “crisp” film.

I really do think there are some books that should not be made into film. My favorite, John Kennedy Toole’s A Confederacy of Dunces, is a perfect example. There is just some things that are too detailed and involved to be parsed down into a 2 hour flick.

Well, I have one more Gatsby link for you, a solemn one. The Great Gatsby: F Scott Fitzgerald’s novels are read by millions, but he was buried in near anonymity

The bard of the Jazz Age shouldn’t be buried here. On a hillside in Hollywood perhaps, where he spent his last, unhappy years, or in glamorous downtown Manhattan – or even in Père Lachaise in Paris, the last resting place of Oscar Wilde and Jim Morrison, among other foreigners who sought inspiration or refuge in the City of Light. But not in the commercial suburbs of Washington DC, among office blocks and strip malls, in a cemetery wedged between a six-lane highway and a railway line.

F Scott Fitzgerald

That, though, is where you find the grave of F Scott Fitzgerald, at St Mary’s Catholic Church in Rockville, Maryland, an Exxon station visible from the spot where he lies. In the pre-car age Rockville must have been a small village in the countryside; the church itself dates from 1817, when America was barely 40 years old. Today, however, it is Anywhere, USA.

Boston Boomer linked to Ginsburg’s comments on Roe v Wade yesterday, oh-oh is right….I thought it should be put on the front page: Justice Ginsburg: Roe v. Wade not ‘woman-centered’ – chicagotribune.com

And finally….5 Ways Motherhood Has Changed Over Time : Discovery News

It’s easy to take the job description of motherhood for granted: Take care of your kids, in whatever way you can. The specifics, though, are a little trickier.

In fact, the meaning and duties of being a mom have undergone great upheaval just in the last century. Should moms work outside the home or stay with the kids full time? Does letting a baby cry scar it or strengthen it? Should moms be praised just for being moms?

The answers to these questions depend on the era in which they’re asked. Throughout U.S. history, moms have been exalted, demonized and exalted again. Their instincts have been questioned and ruled sacrosanct. And they’ve taken the most guilt upon themselves during periods where they spend the most time with their children.

Read on for five ways motherhood has changed in the United States.

So Happy Mother’s Day to you, and for everyone else…enjoy the rest of your Sunday!


Rick Perry Can’t Handle The Truth

Jack Ohman, Sacramento Bee

Jack Ohman, Sacramento Bee

Via Raw Story, the above cartoon by Jack Ohman of the Sacramento Bee, published last Thursday, has Texas Governor Rick Perry all hot under the collar–so much so that he (or some flunky) wrote a letter to the editor, which the Bee published on Friday. Here it is:

Re “Business is booming in Texas” (Editorial cartoon, April 25): It was with extreme disgust and disappointment I viewed your recent cartoon. While I will always welcome healthypolicy debate, I won’t stand for someone mocking the tragic deaths of my fellow Texans and our fellow Americans.

Additionally, publishing this on the very day our state and nation paused to honor and mourn those who died only compounds the pain and suffering of the many Texans who lost family and friends in this disaster. The Bee owes the community of West, Texas an immediate apology for your detestable attempt at satire.

– Gov. Rick Perry, Austin, Tex.

So far, Ohman’s editor Stuart Leavenworth is standing up for him. You can read his full response at the above link. From Raw Story:

Stuart Leavenworth, the editorial page editor of The Sacramento Bee, said the cartoon illustrated Perry’s “disregard for worker safety, and his attempts to market Texas as a place where industries can thrive with few regulations.”

Earlier this year, California Gov. Jerry Brown chided Texas for having a high percentage of workers earning minimum wage. Perry responded about a month later by running radio ads in California that encouraged business owners to move to his state. Perry claimed building a business in California was “next to impossible” because of regulations and taxes — regulations and taxes that his state lacked.

Ohman wrote about the “controversy” on his blog today. He says that a number of readers chastised him for the cartoon.

Their comments ranged from “you are a sick human being” to “insensitive and tasteless.” I’m not sure I am clinically qualified to give myself a direct diagnosis, but I am pretty sure I am not a sick human being. Let’s explore the question of tastelessness.

The Texas chemical plant had not been inspected by the state of Texas since 2006. That’s seven years ago. You may have read in the news that Gov. Perry, during his business recruiting trips to California and Illinois, generally described his state as free from high taxes and burdensome regulation. One of the burdensome regulations he neglected to mention was the fact that his state hadn’t really gotten around to checking out that fertilizer plant. Many Texas cities have little or no zoning, resulting in homes being permitted next to sparely inspected businesses that store explosive chemicals….

When I have to come up with these ideas, I can assure you that I am not really deliberately trying to be tasteless. I am not. What I am trying to do is make readers think about an issue in a striking way. I seem to have succeeded in this cartoon, one way or the other.

The question is whether it is tasteless or not.

My answer, respectfully, is that it isn’t.

Having said that, what normal person doesn’t mourn those poor people fighting the fire and living by the plant? I certainly do. What makes me angry, and, yes, I am driven by anger, is that it could have been prevented. I guess I could have done a toned-down version of the cartoon; I am not sure what that would have been, but I think many readers’ objections just stemmed from the fact that I used the explosion as a metaphor, period. The wound is fresh, the hurt still stings.

texas-governor-rick-perry

Personally, I thought the cartoon was brilliant–a perfect example of the old saying “a picture is worth a thousands words.” Apparently it got a pretty big rise out of Perry when the thousands of gallons of ink spilled on news stories hasn’t. Perry should be ashamed to show his face in public after what happened in West, Texas. Why on earth do Texans keep reelecting this guy?

Ohman recommended that Perry read this outstanding investigation by Pro Publica, which I read and recommended a few days ago: What Went Wrong in West, Texas — and Where Were the Regulators? Perry should either read it or have his flunky read it to him. Then he should wake up and realize that millions of Americans disapprove of his laissez-faire, Ayn Randian approach to government, and cartoonist Jack Ohman expressed our feelings perfectly.

But I don’t expect Perry will take responsibility for his role in the West, Texas disaster, because he can’t handle the truth.


Who Can be Trusted with Infrastructure? Certainly not for-profits …

ap_arkansas_oil_spill_bird_tk_130405_wblogThe one thing that has become apparent to me recently is that privatizing anything related to important infrastructure is a recipe for one disaster after another.  For-profit corporations are into maximizing profits to owners by either slashing costs or hiking prices.  They rarely do anything that actually improves service or delivery quality.  When you experience any kind of disaster that taxes the infrastructure, you learn quickly how negligent for-profits are when it comes to maintaining or fixing infrastructure.  My reality since Hurricane Katrina is living with infrastructure that comes and goes on a windy day, on a drizzly day, on any kind of day that might cause our privately owned electric and natural gas company’s patched together infrastructure to hiccup.  We get power outages at the super bowl, in my home, and in our water treatment plant.  I’ve experienced two boil water orders in the last six months and dozens of electric outages for days on end.  Cox cable’s infrastructure is just about as bad.  They patch things up when they have to do it.  I’ve heard excuses about hungry squirrels, curious racoons, and unusual wind events to the point I could just scream.

Then, there’s these oil pipe disasters.  Why on earth would you trust an oil company with any kind of pipe line given their obvious neglect?  There is a THIRD major oil spill in a week. This time it is in Texas.

Thousands of gallons of oil have spilled from a pipeline in Texas, the third accident of its kind in only a week.

Shell Pipeline, a unit of Royal Dutch Shell Plc, shut down their West Columbia, Texas, pipeline last Friday after electronic calculations conducted by the US National Response Center showed that upwards of 700 barrels had been lost, amounting to almost 30,000 gallons of crude oil.

By Monday, Shell spokespeople said inspectors found “no evidence” of an oil leak, but days later it was revealed that a breach did occur. Representatives with the US Coast Guard confirmed to Dow Jones on Thursday that roughly 50 barrels of oil spilled from a pipe near Houston, Texas and entered a waterway that connects to the Gulf of Mexico.

Coast Guard Petty Officer Steven Lehman said that Shell had dispatched clean-up crews that were working hard to correct any damage to Vince Bayou, a small waterway that runs for less than 20 miles from the Houston area into a shipping channel that opens into the Gulf.

The spill was contained, said Lehman, who was hesitant to offer an official number on how much crude was lost in the accident. According to Shell spokeswoman Kim Windon, though, the damage could have been quite significant. After being presented with the estimate that said as much as 700 barrels were found to have leaked from the pipeline due to an unknown cause, investigators determined that 60 barrels entered the bayou.

“That’s a very early estimate–things can change,” Officer Lehman told Dow Jones.

Meanwhile, though, rescue works in Arkansas have been getting their hands dirty responding to an emergency there. A rupture in ExxonMobil’s Pegasus pipeline late last week send thousands of barrels of oil into the small town of Mayflower, around 25 miles outside of Little Rock. Authorities evacuated more than 20 homes in response, and by this Thursday roughly 19,000 barrels had been recovered.

Mayflower, Ark is still fighting the sludge and will likely be doing so for some time.

We tend to think of oil spills on a massive scale, so large they are hard to imagine. Millions of barrels of crude  pouring into the Bering Sea from the slashed hull of the Exxon Valdez.  Tens of thousands of workers and volunteers combing hundreds of miles of Gulf Coast beaches after the Deep Water Horizon spill. But in Mayflower, Ark., the scale of an oil spill there is disturbing not for its size, but its proximity.   On March 29, a 20-inch buried pipeline burst under the small town, turning backyards into tar pits and suburban streets into oil slicks.

This will probably be yet another part of our new reality given the age of pipelines–around 70 years old–and the continued negligence of oil companies who continue to make record profits and enjoy stupendous tax breaks in this country.

Wanna another weird example of infrastructure failure?

Residents of Washington, DC are used to jokes about metaphorical hot air, humidity, and the swampy history of their city. But there’s something they may not know about the District: it’s overrun with methane, which sometimes makes manhole covers explode.

Natural gas is mostly methane, and it is carried through underground pipes to heat buildings and cook food. Those pipes are often old, and this led ecologist and chemical engineer Robert Jackson of Duke University to drive around DC over a period of two months, regularly measuring the air to take methane levels.

He and his research team found methane leaks everywhere, with thousands of places having significantly higher than normal methane concentrations, and some places reaching 50 times normal urban levels (100 ppm vs 2 ppm). A similar study in Boston last year found essentially the same results. In DC, the source wasn’t the swamp on which the city was built — it was fossil fuel. (The methane they measured had more carbon-13 rather than the normal, modern carbon-12.)

You can laugh about this but I’ve actually seen exploding manhole covers in action.  I was gigging at Balconies restaurant down in the French Quarter.  The piano was700 royal situated under a window and the restaurant–now defunct–was located in a building on the 600 block of Royal.  It’s a really famous intersection and the building is one of those that gets photographed all the time.  The window is basically to the left of the open door where they black car is passing the building.  Mule drawn carriages would stop there frequently to listen to me play and to have a cocktail or cafe au lait brought out for the occupents.  Anyway, one night, after a series of exploding man hole covers had been shutting down the electricity in the Quarter, one of them in the middle of this street took off like a cannon and sliced through the top part of a car right before my eyes.  Of course, the electricity went off in the area and shut down the grocery across the street, the restaurants and everything in that locale. But, I’ll tell you, that manhole cover was an unbelievable projectile.  Oh, it of course, the natural gas in town is Entergy-controlled.  The other thing I recall was the distinct smell of ozone burning up and the wierdish green light show. This was about 15 years ago, but damn, I will never forget watching the roof of a hard top car get sliced off like a piece of salami. It’s been fixed now since the city doesn’t tolerate anything being wrong in the French Quarter, but for about 3 months of the summer 1996, it was a wild trip with a series of exploding manhole covers and black outs.  It was also the same summer I got Karma so, who knows. Maybe it was just one of those summers.

Anyway, after having lived in a city where levees failed us and electricity fails us all the time, I would just like to say that no private corporation should be left on its own with unmonitored vital infrastructure.  All kinds of things are at stake.  Also, you can’t trust any oil company to do right by any one but themselves after a spill.  I have experience in that area too.


Goof off thread…of course it is an open one.

Picture of Miriam’s house…

I haven’t been on the internet that much lately, but today I did check in on Facebook, and I thought I’d share a few things with you. First from my buddy Miriam, just an update on how she is doing.

I have the best friends in the world..and by that I mean, in the world, scattered across the globe, for so many different worlds…this past few weeks have shown me just how much these relationships have grown and how important you all are to me.. ♥
Thank you for being out there, in real life, on skype, in emails and messages and in thoughtful packages of love…you are awesome!!

Social media is a wonderful things at times. I love being able to keep up with friends in a quick non-committed way.

Here are a few other things I found…

From Mona, she always post such great things:

Today is International Day Against Violence Against Women. Show your support for ending gender-based violence by sharing and learning more about the issue:
http://www.halftheskymovement.org/issues/gender-based-violence

From Kathy/Delphyne:

- The President -

This particular Giant Sequoia is the second largest living tree on earth, and has been formally named “President”. Located in Sequoia National Park, Sierra Nevada.

“Its trunk is rusty red, thickened with deep layers of furrowed bark, and 27 feet in diameter at the base. Its footprint would cover your dining room. Trying to glimpse its tippy top, or craning to see the shape of i

ts crown, could give you a sore neck. It’s a giant sequoia, a member of Sequoiadendron giganteum, one of several surviving species of redwoods…Its four great limbs, each as big as a sizable tree, elbow outward from the trunk around halfway up, billowing into a thick crown like a mushroom cloud flattening against the sky. Although its trunk isn’t quite so bulky as that of the largest giant, the General Sherman, its crown is fuller than the Sherman’s. The President holds nearly two billion leaves…Giant sequoias are gigantic because they are very, very old.They are so old because they have survived all the threats that could have killed them. They’re too strong to be knocked over by wind. Their heartwood and bark are infused with tannic acids and other chemicals that protect against fungal rot. Wood-boring beetles hardly faze them. Their thick bark is flame resistant. Ground fires, in fact, are good for sequoia populations, burning away competitors, opening sequoia cones, allowing sequoia seedlings to get started amid the sunlight and nurturing ash. Lightning hurts the big adults but usually doesn’t kill them. So they grow older and bigger across the millennia…”The President contains at least 54,000 cubic feet of wood and bark, has been detected to be roughly 3,200 years old, and as of 2002, the volume of its trunk measured about 1278 cubic meters.Source:
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/12/sequoias/quammen-text

“Forest Giant” Gallery:
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2012/12/sequoias/nichols-photography#/03-snow-tree-from-base-670.jpg

Photograph by Michael Nichols:
http://www.michaelnicknichols.com/

Additional Info:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/President_(tree)

From one of my artsy Etsy friends:
That woman is 90 years old, and she looks great.
Not all of these are just re-post, they are actual status stuff written by the person who posted it on their FB walls.
Another picture from a weaving friend:
Just fixed my broken belt loops. Something about little basic/easy sewing fixes is so rewarding! Even more so that I get to use a 100 year old machine.
From one of my friends back in Tampa…Grace. I’ve known here since 2nd grade:
Reflective thought of the day: Father Time, I’m trying really hard to embrace you, but you pass too quickly. Yep, that means heading back to work tomorrow.
I’ve got another personal post, from another long time friend:
17 years ago I was truely blessed with my baby girl! Although we have our ups and downs, she is truely an amazing person & my best friend. Words cannot describe blessed I am to have her in my life!! Love you with all my heart.. ♥ mom!!
Here is one from a girl I went to school with…starting from kindergarten. She just got married last week:
Honeymoon ain’t over…. 2 trees up, lights outside, gifts under tree and off for a spa day!!!! Yeeehaw love my hubby!
I’ll let you know what she post this time next year, I bet that honeymoon will be over big time!
From another friend, this one I’ve know all my life:
From another old friend, she shared this:
MY BEAUTIFUL MOTHER..SHE WILL BE 81 TOMORROW AND IS SO FUNNY AND FULL OF LIFE…SHE IS MY WORLD!!
My beautiful Abuela. She will be 81 mañana :) She is my heart. http://instagr.am/p/SdxSQ6FBEj/
Here is a funny picture, I don’t have any cats but I know lots of you do:
From the Being Liberal Page:
And finally from George Takei, who always makes me laugh:
Just bits of lives, and funny pictures…with a touch of important stuff thrown in. Have a great night!
This is an open thread.

Part two: Cartoons and more…Cartoons

And away we go…

This first cartoon made me think of Harvey.  Cagle Post » GOP Real Election Fraud

GOP Real Election Fraud © Jeff Parker,Florida Today and the Fort Myers News-Press,Republican, GOP, elections, voter, fraud, registration, drive, laws, rules, ethics, false, signatures, Democrat, ID

Some of these cartoons were from early in the week, this one is from Sept. 26th:

Mitt Mouthed – Political Cartoon by Steve Artley, Artleytoons – 09/26/2012

Cartoon by Steve Artley - Mitt Mouthed

I wonder if you all get this one: Cagle Post » An Honest Man

An Honest Man © Bill Schorr,Cagle Cartoons,honest,man

Of course you would…just like many of you would get the Harvey connection up top.

Cagle Post » Trevor in the Middle of Nowhere

Trevor in the Middle of Nowhere © Dwayne Booth,Mr. Fish,election, republicans, democrats, obama, romney

I think that there should be a large group of elephants trampling Trevor down…then a single donkey comes along and shits on him.  Seems like it would fit, don’t ya think?  All these damn GOP nuts running us over with there right wing christian jesus freak beliefs…and all the Dems do is sit there and pile on more bullshit responses.

This next one is for BB: Replacement Refs – Political Cartoon by Don Landgren Jr., TelegramTowns – 10/05/2012

Cartoon by Don Landgren Jr. - Replacement Refs

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Phil Hands, Wisconsin State Journal – 10/05/2012

Cartoon by Phil Hands -

One on the Spain situation, coming up: AAEC – Political Cartoon by Gustavo Rodriguez, El Nuevo Herald – 09/30/2012

Cartoon by Gustavo Rodriguez -

Hey, with such a big bull, I think he needs a set of bigger balls! Don’t you?

And, for the last funny: AAEC – Political Cartoon by Charlie Daniel, Knoxville News Sentinel – 09/30/2012

Cartoon by Charlie Daniel -

Okay, that is all folks….tomorrow is the big ass KKK rally here in Banjoville. I will not be going downtown to see these assholes parade around in their white sheets. As it is, the sheriff office has an additional 35 Georgia state troopers coming in to keep the peace.

KKK will rally Saturday in Blairsville

I will be sure to post links to this crap in my Sunday post. Honestly, I would be afraid to go see who supports this Hate Group, something tells me many of our local friends may be hiding under those hoods.