Wednesday Reads: You like chicken. Order that.

3e5baafcd1a0acc0135766e49746d593Good Morning

Today’s post will focus on discrimination, hate and hate crimes. Whether it is outright racism… unquestionable prejudice…probable intolerance or a hint of bigotry with a touch of “that just ain’t right” sexism.

First up however, a quick look at what is going on in Ferguson:

Another Night Of Unrest During Tenth Night Of Protests In Ferguson

After nine nights of unrest met with tear gas, riot gear and a National Guard presence, Tuesday night in Ferguson, Missouri began peacefully. But by midnight central time, tensions began to rise.

Many protesters marched along West Florissant Avenue, chanting “no justice no peace,” and “hands up, don’t shoot,” while others loitered looking on. Police were not enforcing Capt. Ron Johnson’s rule forcing protesters to keep moving or risk removal.

While people were relieved at the initial lack of confrontation Tuesday night, everyone recognized how fragile the situation was and that it could turn instantly.

I really don’t know what happened overnight, but Holder did make a statement about the situation.

Eric Holder Pens Message to Ferguson Ahead of Wednesday’s Visit

Attorney General Eric Holder will visit Ferguson, Missouri on Wednesday to get briefed by local authorities on the situation there following the fatal shooting of 18-year-old unarmed Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson. But before he arrives, Holder has written a message to the people of Ferguson for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

“At a time when so much may seem uncertain, the people of Ferguson can have confidence that the Justice Department intends to learn — in a fair and thorough manner — exactly what happened,” Holder writes.

He says he plans to “meet personally with community leaders, FBI investigators and federal prosecutors from the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and the U.S. Attorney’s Office to receive detailed briefings on the status of this case” while in Ferguson tomorrow.

Holder urges an “end to the acts of violence in the streets of Ferguson,” saying that “they seriously undermine, rather than advance, the cause of justice.” He also vows that the Justice Department will “defend the right of protesters to peacefully demonstrate and for the media to cover a story that must be told.”

Here’s some thoughts regarding Holder’s statement and his plans to go to Ferguson:

Wall Street Journal editor: Eric Holder should tell Ferguson protesters to ‘pull up their pants’

Yeah, go and read what Wall Street Journal editorial board member Jason Riley had to say…

…Holder was there as part of President Barack Obama’s efforts to play “race-healer-in-chief.”

“These looters and rioters do not need to hear from the attorney general that criticism of Obama is race-based,” Riley told host Bret Bauer. “What they need to hear from this Black man in this position — the nation’s leading law enforcement official — is that they need to stay out of trouble with the law. They need to pull up their pants and finish school and take care of their kids. That is the message they need to hear.”

Riley is African-American, and he is not the only black man who is making outrageous statements like this. Check this out, – Tea Party Leader: Black ‘Thugs’ Do Not Deserve Due Process (VIDEO)

Then you have reaction to the statement made by Missouri Gov. Nixon, from John Marshall at TPM: Is That an Editing Error?

I want to be very clear on the point I’m about to make so that I’m not misunderstood. Gov. Nixon of Missouri put out a statement this evening on the situation in Ferguson. Much of it is boilerplate that wouldn’t surprise or inspire you. (I’m reprinting it in its entirety at the end of this post.) The gist is that to move forward peace needs to be restored in Ferguson and there needs to be justice in the case of the precipitating event – the death of Michael Brown. (There is a separate controversy over Nixon’s decision not to appoint a special prosecutor – which I think is a mistake.) But in the key line – the part two of his statement he says that “a vigorous prosecution must now be pursued.”

Now, let me be clear. This is not remotely to suggest that the facts will not show that a prosecution is in order. Based on what we know publicly, it seems very likely that there should be. But let’s not let the justified outrage at what’s transpired obscure a simple fact. There’s a great deal we in the public do not know about what happened. This goes without saying. There will be sworn witness statements, forensic evidence about Brown and Wilson and a lot else. Indeed, it’s one of the significant problems in this saga that so little information has been released. But there’s a process: a full investigation and then a decision by a prosecutor. That hasn’t happened yet.

It’s an entirely different matter for members of the public to demand a prosecution. But this is the Governor of the state, the elected official who has ultimate responsibility for carrying out the laws of the state. It’s simply crazy for him to be saying there has to be a prosecution. It’s so inappropriate that I think it’s highly likely that this is actually an editing error – or someone doing the writing who just didn’t grasp the significance of the word choice.

But even if that’s the case, the principle is so basic and important that it’s important to note: the Governor shouldn’t be publicly assuming that Wilson must be prosecuted or that a prosecution must happen for justice to be served.

BTW, Getty released a statement as well…regarding their photojournalist who was arrested Monday night. Statement from Pancho Bernasconi, VP, News, on the arrest of Getty Images staff photographer Scott Olson in Ferguson | Getty Images Press Room | Latest company news, media announcements and information

We at Getty Images stand firmly behind our colleague Scott Olson and the right to report from Ferguson. Getty Images is working to secure his release as soon as possible.  

We strongly object to his arrest and are committed to ensuring he is able to resume his important work of capturing some of the most iconic images of this news story.

Now we get to the other stories making news that touch on the subject of this post. Hate.

Read the rest of this entry »


Sunday Reads: Time Lapses

71d3459140005b43af4c275172f1a4d9Good Morning

Time lapse photography is something that fascinates me, I think we can look at a picture of a time lapse image and see a metaphor for life. Movement, continuous and repetitive.

There are a couple of types of time lapse photography….the short exposure kind which 63c58031b4a2abf282b982963ab1e3dbtakes a normal exposure of sequential pictures over many hours or even days and edit them into one photograph.

<——————————–

(Like the sunset images you see by artist, Matt Molloy. )

 

Time lapse of moths in the porchlight - photographed by Steve Irvine for National Geographic

Time lapse of moths in the porchlight – photographed by Steve Irvine for National Geographic

Or the long exposure method, where the camera shutter remains open for a long period of time and exposes the film to the image it is photographing.

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These particular long exposed photos are blurred in appearance.  Creating a glowing, disoriented, disturbed, ghostlike, or drugged feeling when you look at them.

It seems as if we are living in a time lapsed state of mind, as you have been reading the Boston Boomer’s and Dak’s coverage of late, the mess in Missouri is just the result of what has been building over time. Like the images you will see below throughout the post…the same scenarios have been played out all over the US. The actual persons involved may be different, but the general characteristics are the same. When we see the reports of racial violence play out on the news, we feel that repetition. Like the time lapsed images, the scenes become blurred. Yet we know what happens at the end of the shot. There is a good example of the differences in media treatment of violence here by the way: When The Media Treats White Suspects And Killers Better Than Black Victims be sure to look at that….No need to belabor the point, I will just let this op/ed by Farai Chideya from the Guardian do that for me.

Waiting in Grand Central Station by James Maher, time-lapse picture. Prints available on his website.

Waiting in Grand Central Station by James Maher, time-lapse picture. Prints available on his website.

(One note however, it makes a uncomfortable point when Rand Paul gets a pat on the back from a black woman…considering the neocon racist misogynistic shit he usually spews…but you’ll get the point the author is making.) On race, America has far to go. Ferguson won’t be the last flash point

 

I spent my very early years in New York, living a very multiracial Sesame Street life, a big swinging bellbottom of a childhood. And then our family moved to Baltimore and the iron curtain of the “colour line” fell. I felt that I had moved from the 1970s through a time warp where black and white were the only two colours and never the twain shall socially meet.

 

I grew to understand what the 50s were actually like in Baltimore, when my mother, for example, was permitted to buy clothes from the major department store but not try them on. (Heaven forfend some black lady should be in the dressing room, right? You know they leave a residue of blackness on the clothes.)

4cadbc8a7518db67eab58c6dd7091105

America has never had one racial reality, but a series of them strung together from San Antonio to Pittsburgh to Appalachia. What we are seeing in Ferguson, Missouri, is the result of life in a specific type of heavily racialised zone. Yes, a city such as New York, where a black man was recently choked to death by police officers, has its own very clear forms of racialisation and it’s a national issue. But the police killing, last week, of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teen in Ferguson has sparked national protests because it represents a specific type of racialisation. This is of the majority black city, big or small, with a white economic and political power structure.

Read the whole opinion piece. This is the part about Rand Paul though, it comes in comparison to Obama’s reactions to Ferguson’s Police Departments militarization:

After the killing of another black youth, Trayvon Martin, Ta-Nehisi Coates wrote a seminal piece for Atlantic magazine called “Fear of a Black President”, describing President Obama as “conservative… in the very sphere where he holds singular gravity – race.”

Two years later, with Ferguson, the president still holds tight to that caution about addressing racial inequality. In terms of day-to-day Washington governance, there is no fear of a black president. Congress fears him not, certainly not the Republicans and not even some members of his own party. And now, with a particularly tepid and circular statement on Ferguson, the president has gone even further.

He seems obsessed with convincing white Americans he is not some goblin come to take their privilege away, rather than recognising that, pragmatically, America still has enough deeply held racial biases that he will be perceived as a race man by some, no matter what he does. (Black Americans learned his political strategy on race early in his first term, as a group of leaders of African American organisations came to ask for more White House focus on jobs in black communities and were rebuffed. They held their televised press conference outside the White House in a snowstorm, a nature-made bathetic fallacy.)

L2e1618565958e4f6a151a0d71c18debeast week, the president delivered a speech that seemed to weigh police intimidation and harassment of protesters and press with acts of vandalism almost equally. “Put simply, we all need to hold ourselves to a high standard, particularly those of us in positions of authority,” he said. “Let’s remember that we’re all part of one American family.”

In this diffuse speech, the president could have spoken out more forcefully against the militarisation of local police forces, as Republican Rand Paul has done. He could have tackled the unacceptable level and variety of unwarranted stops, searches and frisking of black men in particular. For bonus points, he could have gotten into black incarceration rates or, as author Michelle Alexander puts it, the “New Jim Crow”.

You can read the rest at the link.  That is something…when an asshole like Rand gets kudos from a black woman who has the phrase “New Jim Crow” in the same paragraph.  But I think I get her point….yes? I don’t know. Don’t get me wrong, I agree with her, but she could have pick a different politician to highlight…am I right? Let’s not forget that Paul is the dude who didn’t support the Civil Rights Act…no matter what shit he says now: Wash. Post Recasts Rand Paul As Civil Rights Ally, Forgetting Their Own Reporting | Blog | Media Matters for America

Anyway…I need to move on.

In another Op/Ed, this one from the Sprinfield News-Leader, which is quoted as, “This editorial is the view of the News-Leader Editorial Board, Linda Ramey-Greiwe, President and Publisher, Paul Berry, Executive Director, Cheryl Whitsitt, Managing Editor.” Our Voice: Rights lost in Ferguson riots

It is very good, and I feel it is too important not to quote the entire thing:

On Aug. 9, unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by police officer Darren Wilson at 12:01 p.m. in Ferguson. A vigil on Aug. 10 turned violent.

The situation deteriorated from there.

10a05408d491d190dbe05b7c71e4d0bdRiots and arrests. Tear gas and rubber bullets. Real bullets, riot gear and military-grade displays of force. Injuries to both protesters and police. Looting and needless destruction of property. For four straight nights, the clashes escalated, the national media descended, and still, no clear information was put forth about the death of a young, unarmed black man. After a day of relative calm gave hope that the situation was beginning to defuse, tempers flared again Friday.

As unrest continues, the blame game is already underway. At this point, it would be easy to join in on the finger-pointing based on half-truths.

It would be easy join the chorus of voices calling out our elected leaders, Gov. Nixon, U.S. Sens. McCaskill and Blunt and President Obama, for waiting so long to intervene.

It would be easy to place blame on the protesters for turning violent and rioting, citing the need for peaceful assembly.

It would be easy to hoist the burden of responsibility onto local authorities in Ferguson for their poor handling of the situation, inciting protesters to riot rather than bringing calm.

It would be easy to join in blaming the media for stirring up the situation by giving attention to it.

It would be easy to, as some are now doing, blame the young man himself for allegedly participating in a theft prior to his altercation with the police.

But there is nothing easy about the situation in Ferguson. A solution for the community will take doing the hard work.

Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri State Highway Patrol is doing the hard work. Rather than waging a battle, Johnson is working to open the lines of communication and erase the artificial boundaries between authorities and protesters.

State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal and St. Louis alderman Antonio French are doing the hard work. Providing on-the-ground leadership, standing up to rioters, calling for peaceful protests and documenting events on Twitter, their work is reason to hope that the community will make it through this crisis.

There is no shortage of people being thrust forward to take the blame for what has happened in Ferguson. But at this moment, as the nation watches a community teetering on the edge of chaos, we must take the time to examine exactly what we are losing.

1d1f05280a72b879b2cde8a62e3a0275An unarmed young man was shot and killed by police. His right to due process was violated, which demands an explanation. With an investigation underway, it is our duty as citizens to care as much about the process and outcome of the investigations by the FBI and Department of Justice as we do the riots.

As the black community in Ferguson protested, it was met with aggression, intimidation and eventual force from authorities. Some people rioted, which cannot be condoned in our society and should be dealt with. But many assembled peacefully, and were met with the same treatment. Peacefully assembled crowds had their rights violated as well. We must seek answers as to why.

Two reporters, Wesley Lowery of the Washington Post and Ryan Reilly of the Huffington Post, were taken into custody as they tried to follow police orders to leave a McDonald’s restaurant, where they were working. Other journalists were specifically told to stop reporting what was happening. Again, rights were violated, this time in an attempt to silence the press that is promised to remain free.

Blame is as easy to assign as it is to dodge. At some point, someone will “take responsibility” for what happened. Over the past several years, this has come to mean little more than an acceptance that people will think poorly of the person for a few weeks.

5723b558462f2f1cacf666aeb4593696Or until the next big outrage comes along to distract us.

As Americans and Missourians thankful for the rights afforded to us by our Constitution, we must not lose interest in these events because the spectacle stops. Now is the time to wade through the rhetoric in order to hold our government and society accountable for what is happening in Ferguson.

It’s the only way we’ll manage to restore those rights.

Good for the Springfield News-Leader! Damn glad there is a press out there near the heart of the situation that is keeping check on things.  The News-Leader is a Gannett newspaper…

As I was getting ready to shut down the laptop, these headlines caught my attention:

It’s around 4:00 AM btw.

Ferguson On Edge On First Night With Curfew Huffington Post

Clusters of Protesters Defy Night Curfew in Ferguson – NYTimes.com

Police enforce curfew against protesters in Ferguson, Missouri | Reuters

Police deploy tear gas to impose Ferguson curfew – Nation – Boston.com

 

Okay. Next up, another op/ed, a link from last week: Rekha Basu: Iowa summit serves reminder of why religion, politics don’t mix | Opinion | McClatchy DC

Of everything coming out of this year’s Iowa Family Leadership Summit, the fear factor is what stayed with me.

It was a constant, discomfiting undercurrent, like a loose nail poking up in your shoe. It was organization President Bob Vander Plaats declaring this a time of “spiritual warfare,” and speaker Joel Rosenberg announcing America is “on the road to collapse” and “implosion,” and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, warning grimly, “We are living in some very dangerous times.”

The third year of the event sponsored by the self-described Christ-centered organization that seeks to influence policy and elections, brought big name politicians Bobby Jindal, Rick Santorum, Ted Cruz and Rick Perry to Ames, Iowa, this past weekend. They were there to rally the Republican base in the lead-off caucus state. But the upbeat, love-God-and-country tone of previous events appeared at times to have been replaced by a somber, calamitous note of foreboding. Even Satan got a few mentions.

2535da149fb4be80aa512412356bb63dProjected onto a giant screen to punctuate Vander Plaats’ remarks was a video filled with haunting images of Osama bin Laden, Adam Lanza and the Boston marathon bombings. It depicted a rising national debt, marijuana, Boys Scouts, gay rainbow flag and a woman holding up a “Keep abortion legal” sign. It ended with someone yelling, “God is dead. Hail Satan!”

Sponsors and speakers still exalted matrimony and procreation in heterosexual relationships, called for putting God back in the classroom and government, and called abortion murder. But this year’s message was: The nation is in moral decline. Ignore it at your own peril. That was even carried into foreign policy.

 

I am telling you all, I live in the bible belt. I see these assholes everyday. They are powerful. And they vote.

Rosenberg, an evangelical Christian born to a Jewish father, said the United States must not support a two-state solution in Israel because a sovereign Palestinian state “defies the biblical mandate.” Interesting that a Christian American would presume to tell Palestinian Muslims they don’t deserve a homeland because of what the Bible says. This follows an evangelical belief that Jews from around the world will gather in Israel, where the second coming of Christ will occur and – though Rosenberg didn’t spell this out – be converted to Christianity.

“God loves you but if we don’t receive Christ, there are consequences,” Rosenberg warned.

e90122b747c138a358eb49854f70d5b8Is fear a new strategy for the Family Leader and its affiliated Family Research Council and Focus on the Family? Is it a response to flagging interest and political losses? Organizers said there were 1,200 attendees, and that there has been steady growth in three years. But many seats were empty. Is it a concession they’re losing the battle over abortion and gay rights? Abortion has not been completely outlawed, even under a conservative U.S. Supreme Court majority. Having succeeded in getting three justices of the Iowa Supreme Court voted out over same-sex marriage, a few years ago, the Family Leader failed in its more recent campaign against a fourth. Same-sex couples are celebrating wedding anniversaries with children and grandchildren, and the planet has survived.

What the planet might not ultimately survive – global warming – wasn’t on the agenda. In fact, if this were a true gathering of faith leaders, one might have expected some commitment to keeping the environment healthy, some compassion for the poor and immigrants. There were calls for abolishing the entire tax system that sustains the poor in times of need. There were calls for boosting border patrols to turn back young asylum seekers before their cases are heard. Iowa’s governor, Terry Branstad, boasted of having cut 1,400 state employees and cut property taxes, which fund education, more than ever in Iowa history.

b31a8821deca5cc1cf34fe447a61cb1eBut if it were a political forum to vet candidates, a Jewish, Muslim, agnostic or atheist one would have had no place there. In one video, Billy Graham’s daughter, Anne Graham Lotz, said, “The only place you get right with God is at the foot of the cross of Jesus Christ.”

 

As with the other links, I urge you to read it all. That blurred scene that distorts and disturbs….you can feel it!

On the ridiculous notion, I must say this could have been me: South Carolina Mom Arrested For Cursing In Front Of Her Kids

Parents, it looks like it’s time to be ever-vigilant about your choice of words. Dropping an F-bomb in front of your kids can land you in jail.

Mom Danielle Wolf was grocery shopping at a Kroger store in North Augusta, South Carolina when she was arrested for disorderly conduct after cursing in the presence of her two daughters, WJBF News Channel 6 reports.

According to the incident report from the North Augusta Department Of Public Safety, Wolf yelled at her children, told them to “stop squishing the f*cking bread,” and used “similar phrases multiple times.” Another woman at the store then approached the mother and asked her to stop using that language with her children.

 

7b0dd5e4b1f9666ab1d32a8c1f72e475But Wolf insists this is not what happened. “She’s like, ‘you told that they were smashing the bread’, and I said ‘no’ I said that to my husband, that he was smashing the bread by throwing the frozen pizzas on top of it,” she told WJBF.

But the woman, who was referred to “Ms. Smith” in the police report and later identified as “Michelle” by NBC affiliate WAGT, reported Wolf to the authorities, leading to the mother’s arrest for disorderly conduct.

“He was like, ‘You’re under arrest’… right in front of kids, in front of my husband, in front of customers,” Wolf told WJBF of the officer who approached her in the store. She added, “I didn’t harm nobody. I didn’t hurt nobody. The lady said she was having a bad day. So, because you’re having a bad day you’re going to ruin somebody’s life.”

Well, fuckadoodledoo!

Perhaps arresting the mother in front of her kids was more traumatic than telling the dumbass husband to stop “squishing the fucking bread.”

In the world of Amazon and the Washington Post, a buck is a buck: Bezos-owned Washington Post now inserting gross Amazon affiliate links into news articles | PandoDaily

Six paragraphs into the story, we find this…

Screen Shot 2014-08-16 at 6.32.53 PM

…a “buy it now” button, wedged into editorial copy and linked to an affiliate account of Amazon.

1eaa186b6b4ccd5bd8c7bca64ace6628A quick skim around the WaPost site suggests this is something the Post is doing with all of its book reviews now, as well as on news items and even letters to the editor. The link to the Roald Dahl book links to the Amazon affiliate ID “slatmaga-20″ (presumably short for Slate Magazine, per the Post’s ties with that publication). That ID can also be found in a link within this letter to the editor. Meanwhile, this music book review links to the Amazon affiliate ID “thewaspost-03″.

Despite the various IDs being used, one thing is very clear: The Washington Post now sees reviews of books, and even news reports about books, as fair game for selling those same to readers, editorial independence be dammed.

Shit. What do you think will come next?  Brought to you by Carl’s Jr. 

(Hope you get that commercial reference.)

 

This post is getting real…real…real long so let’s just link dump for a bit. After the jump.

Read the rest of this entry »


Friday Nite Lite: Perry Indicted…For Abuse of Power

Bwaaahhhhaaah!!!!

Texas Gov. Perry Indicted on Charge of Abuse of Power

Now for the funnies…

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Ted Rall, Universal Press Syndicate – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by Ted Rall -

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by MStreeter, Savannah Morning News – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by MStreeter -

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Scott Stantis, Chicago Tribune – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by Scott Stantis -

 

Clay Bennett editorial cartoon – Political Cartoon by Clay Bennett, Chattanooga Times Free Press – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by Clay Bennett - Clay Bennett editorial cartoon

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Pat Bagley, Salt Lake Tribune – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by Pat Bagley -

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Pat Bagley, Salt Lake Tribune – 08/14/2014

Cartoon by Pat Bagley -

 

War On Whites – Political Cartoon by Rob Rogers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – 08/14/2014

Cartoon by Rob Rogers - War On Whites

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Nick Anderson, Houston Chronicle – 08/15/2014

Cartoon by Nick Anderson -

 

Ferguson Fracas by Political Cartoonist Nate Beeler

152352 600 Ferguson Fracas cartoons

 

Pope visits South Korea by Political Cartoonist Jimmy Margulies

152349 600 Pope visits South Korea cartoons

Nick Anderson: Depression – Nick Anderson – Truthdig

No Boots on the Ground by Political Cartoonist Bruce Plante

152337 600 No Boots on the Ground cartoons

 

No Boots on the Ground by Political Cartoonist John Darkow

152334 600 No Boots on the Ground cartoons

 

U Fix by Political Cartoonist Mike Luckovich

152325 600 U Fix cartoons

 

Excessive – Political Cartoon by Ed Hall, Artizans Syndicate – 08/14/2014

Cartoon by Ed Hall - Excessive

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Charlie Daniel, Knoxville News Sentinel – 08/14/2014

 

Cartoon by Charlie Daniel -

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Randy Bish, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review – 08/12/2014

Cartoon by Randy Bish -

 

AAEC – Political Cartoon by Gustavo Rodriguez, El Nuevo Herald – 08/14/2014

 

Cartoon by Gustavo Rodriguez -

 

Clay Bennett: Coexist – Clay Bennett – Truthdig

 

 

Cops Kill Unarmed Black Male by Political Cartoonist Jimmy Margulies

 

152302 600 Cops Kill Unarmed Black Male cartoons

 

Trojan Putin by Political Cartoonist Steve Sack

152300 600 Trojan Putin cartoons

 

Ferguson MO shooting by Political Cartoonist Dave Granlund

152279 600 Ferguson MO shooting cartoons

 

Back to Iraq by Political Cartoonist Mike Keefe

152276 600 Back to Iraq cartoons

Deja vu all over again by Political Cartoonist Taylor Jones

152273 600 Deja vu all over again cartoons

 

Peace in the Middle East by Political Cartoonist Martyn Turner

152264 600 Peace in the Middle East cartoons

 

Artist Putin by Political Cartoonist Marian Kamensky

152263 600 Artist Putin cartoons

 

Police Assaults by Political Cartoonist Mike Luckovich

152260 600 Police Assaults cartoons

 

This is an open thread.


Wednesday Reads: Another Hollywood Icon Gone…So Long Slim

    Lauren Bacall, the smoky-voiced movie legend who taught Humphrey Bogart how to whistle in "To Have and Have Not," died today in New York at the age of 89.     -- Los Angeles Times 1944. "Lauren Bacall in checkered jacket." Publicity shot from the New York World-Telegram / The Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection.

Lauren Bacall, the smoky-voiced movie legend who taught Humphrey Bogart how to whistle in “To Have and Have Not,” died today in New York at the age of 89.
– Los Angeles Times
1944. “Lauren Bacall in checkered jacket.” Publicity shot from the New York World-Telegram / The Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection.

Baby: 1924-2014 | Shorpy Historical Photo Archive

While many of us are still reeling from the sad loss of Robin Williams by suicide on Monday, news of Lauren Bacall’s death from a stroke on Tuesday evening was another blow that is hard to comprehend….

Watching Bacall and other Hollywood legends so often on TCM you believe that they will live forever. But, as we know earlier this month, this year and late last year, the loss of stars like Jim Garner, Eli Wallach, Ruby Dee, Shirley Temple, Eleanor Parker, Joan Fontaine…isn’t it strange how the death of these iconic talented artists can affect us?

(For a look at more movie people who have passed this year: IMDb: Most Popular People With Date of Death in 2014)

Here’s a group of obits for Lauren Bacall:

Actress Lauren Bacall Dead at 89 | Mediaite

Update- 8:03 pm: And sadly, the news has been officially confirmed by the estate of Humphrey Bogart, the great actor and Bacall’s late husband.

 

Bacall starred alongside Bogart in such classic films as To Have and Have Not, The Big Sleep, Dark Passage and Key Largo. She was nominated for an Academy Award for her supporting role in 1996′s The Mirror Has Two Faces and was awarded an Honorary Oscar in 2009 at the age of 84.

Watch a summary of her life and career below, via Bio:

 

Lauren Bacall, Sultry Movie Star, Dies at 89 – NYTimes.com

Ms. Bacall seated on a piano played by Vice President Harry S. Truman in 1945. Credit United Press International

Forever Tied to Bogart

She also expressed impatience, especially in her later years, with the public’s continuing fascination with her romance with Bogart, even though she frequently said that their 12-year marriage was the happiest period of her life.

“I think I’ve damn well earned the right to be judged on my own,” she said in a 1970 interview with The New York Times. “It’s time I was allowed a life of my own, to be judged and thought of as a person, as me.”

Years later, however, she seemed resigned to being forever tied to Bogart and expressed annoyance that her later marriage to another leading actor, Jason Robards Jr., was often overlooked.

“My obit is going to be full of Bogart, I’m sure,” she told Vanity Fair magazine in a profile of her in March 2011, adding: “I’ll never know if that’s true. If that’s the way, that’s the way it is.”

Lauren Bacall, Hollywood’s Icon of Cool, Dies at 89

She admitted that being a “legend” and “special lady of film” unnerved her because “in my slightly paranoiac head, legends and special ladies don’t work, it’s over for them; they just go around being legends and special ladies.”

She was born Betty Jean Perske in the Bronx on Sept. 16, 1924, the only child of Jewish immigrants. Her father left the family when she was 6, and her mother struggled to make ends meet. She attracted attention as a teenage model while studying acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York.

Crowned Miss Greenwich Village in 1942, Bacall made her stage debut in George S. Kaufman’s Franklin Street in Washington, then appeared in March 1943 on the cover of Harper’s Bazaar.

That cover photo was noticed by Hawks’ wife, Nancy, who showed it to the celebrated director, and he called Bacall for a screen test. Based on the test, Hawks told her she would star in something with either Bogart or Cary Grant.

“I thought Cary Grant, great. Humphrey Bogart‚ yuck,” she later said. Nonetheless, Hawks had her meet with Bogart and could not help but notice their immediate chemistry, casting her as the femme fatale Marie in To Have and Have Not, an adaptation of the Ernest Hemingway novel. (Bogart’s character, Steve, nicknamed her “Slim,” which Hawks also called his wife.)

In By Myself, she described meeting Bogart for the first time, on the set of Passage to Marseille (1944).

“Howard told me to stay put, he’d be right back — which he was, with Bogart,” she wrote. “He introduced us. There was no clap of thunder, no lightning bolt, just a simple ‘how do you do.’ Bogart was slighter than I imagined‚ 5 foot 10 and a half, wearing his costume of no-shape trousers, cotton shirt and scarf around his neck. Nothing of import was said‚ we didn’t stay long‚ but he seemed a friendly man.”

But soon, Bacall and Bogart — who at the time was married to his third wife, actress Mayo Methot — began an affair during the filming of To Have and Have Not.

 

The New York Times article has a description of that famous scene from To Have and Have Not:

With an insinuating pose and a seductive, throaty voice — her simplest remark sounded like a jungle mating call, one critic said — Ms. Bacall shot to fame in 1944 with her first movie, Howard Hawks’s adaptation of the Ernest Hemingway novel “To Have and Have Not,” playing opposite Humphrey Bogart, who became her lover on the set and later her husband.

It was a smashing debut sealed with a handful of lines now engraved in Hollywood history.

“You know you don’t have to act with me, Steve,” her character says to Bogart’s in the movie’s most memorable scene. “You don’t have to say anything, and you don’t have to do anything. Not a thing. Oh, maybe just whistle. You know how to whistle, don’t you, Steve? You just put your lips together and blow.”

But that was not her only amazing role, 5 Roles That Made Lauren Bacall the Coolest Woman in Movie History

More clips at the link.

Gallery of pictures here: Remembering Lauren Bacall | Photo 1 | TMZ.com

And here: Lauren Bacall Dies at 89; in a Bygone Hollywood, She Purred Every Word – NYTimes.com

And more here: Lauren Bacall Dies — Photos Of Hollywood Actress Through The Years | Deadline

As for the rest of the world: Celebrities React to the Death of Lauren Bacall — Vulture

Now just a few news stories that are not about death.

Iranian is first woman to win prestigious math prize

Yeah…go figure.

Fields Medal mathematics prize won by woman for first time in its history

A woman has won the world’s most prestigious mathematics prize for the first time since the award was established nearly 80 years ago.

Maryam Mirzakhani, a maths professor at Stanford University in California, was named the first female winner of the Fields Medal – often described as the Nobel prize for mathematics – at a ceremony in Seoul on Wednesday morning.

The prize, worth 15,000 Canadian dollars, is awarded to exceptional talents under the age of 40 once every four years by the International Mathematical Union. Between two and four prizes are announced each time.

Y’all will find this next one interesting from the Guardian: Women’s rights and their money: a timeline from Cleopatra to Lilly Ledbetter

When did women get the right to inherit property and open bank accounts? How long did it take until women won the legal right to be served in UK pubs? Our timeline traces women’s financial rights from ancient societies to the present day

Many modern women in the US and Europe never question their right to open a bank account, own property, or even buy wine or beer in a pub. These rights, however, were hard won: for much of history, and even up to 40 years ago, middle-class women were not allowed to handle money; even having a job was seen as a sign of financial desperation. In the lastest addition to our Money and Feminism series, we trace the modern history of women and money.

Since we are talking about women and their rights, as seen throughout history…what about a look at women and misogyny in Medieval Lit? Medieval Misogyny and Gawain’s Outburst against Women in “‘Sir Gawain and the Green Knight’

In other science news: Is empathy in humans and apes actually different?

And look here, for all those folks who are on anti-anxiety meds: Anti-Anxiety Meds We’re Flushing Down the Toilet Could Be Increasing the Lifespan of Fish | Alternet

The rest of today’s post will feature cartoon tributes to Robin Willaims.

Rest in Peace | BobCesca.com | News and Politics Blog and Podcast | We Cover the World

RIPWilliams

 

Robin Williams by Political Cartoonist Steve Nease

152191 600 Robin Williams cartoons

Robin Williams – Political Cartoon by J.D. Crowe, Alabama Media Group – 08/12/2014

Cartoon by J.D. Crowe - Robin Williams

 

Robin Williams RIP by Political Cartoonist Milt Priggee

152183 600 Robin Williams RIP cartoons

 

Robin Williams by Political Cartoonist Kevin Siers

152230 600 Robin Williams cartoons

 

Robin Williams by Political Cartoonist Pat Bagley

152226 600 Robin Williams cartoons

 

Robin Williams RIP by Political Cartoonist Steve Sack

152225 600 Robin Williams RIP cartoons

Robin Williams RIP by Political Cartoonist Nate Beeler

152223 600 Robin Williams RIP cartoons

Robin Williams by Political Cartoonist Jimmy Margulies

152218 600 Robin Williams cartoons

 

Robin Williams by Political Cartoonist Joe Heller

152212 600 Robin Williams cartoons

 

Robin Williams by Political Cartoonist Bob Englehart

152210 600 Robin Williams cartoons

 

Black Hole by Political Cartoonist Peter Bromhead

152207 600 Black Hole cartoons

 

RIP Robin Williams by Political Cartoonist Manny Francisco

152162 600 RIP Robin Williams cartoons

 

Robin Williams tribute by Political Cartoonist Dave Granlund

152197 600 Robin Williams tribute cartoons


Sunday Reads: No more crazies…no more hateful people

1960: A boy, dressed as a toreador, faces a large prize-winning Jersey cow at a Scottish agricultural show.

1960: A boy, dressed as a toreador, faces a large prize-winning Jersey cow at a Scottish agricultural show.

Good Morning

All this week, there has been a feeling…like I am teetering on the edge of a high precipice. It does not need to be a cliff, it could my front porch down here in Banjoville, a redneck hell hole…where in the past two days my son has been threaten by one crazy ass, gun totting, bad check writing, self-proclaimed FBI-wanted shitkicker who wasn”t happy her check was not accepted by the grocery store Jake is working at now.

And….another self-righteous Christian fucker who asked Jake if he was wearing a medical alert bracelet, to which my son replied….”Yes, I was recently diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes.” You know what this dickjerk Jeeesus-loving freak assclown said???? He said that Jake got that disease because, “Gawd was punishing (Jake) for something” he did…Can you believe these people?

That was just the cherry to what has been an exhausting week. I don’t think I can write any more about it. You get the picture, I am sure of that.

So here are a few links, think of this as an open thread, just can’t manage anything else.

Ship Found At Ground Zero Dates To 1773

A ship found four years ago at the World Trade Center site was made from wood cut around 1773, new research shows.

Scientists at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory said the white oak in the ship’s frame came from a Philadelphia-area forest and matched the material used to build the city’s Independence Hall.

They announced the findings in the July issue of the journal Tree Ring Research.

The discovery links the ship to key dates in American history: 1773 was two years before the start of the war and three years before the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

Scientists Finally Know Why The Moon Is Shaped Like A Lemon

Scientists say they have finally discovered why the moon is shaped a bit like a lemon — somewhat flattened with a bulge on each side. As detailed in a new paper published online in the journal Nature on July 30, 2014, it’s all about tidal and rotational forces.

“Early tides heated the Moon’s crust in different places, and those differences in heating in different areas gave the Moon most of its shape,” lead researcher Ian Garrick-Bethell, an astrophysicist at the University of California, Santa Cruz, told the Agence France-Presse.

In other words, during the moon’s infancy some 4.4 billion years ago — when it was still super-hot as the result of an impact between Earth and another object — the Earth’s gravitational (tidal) forces molded its shape ever so slightly.

“Later on, those tides warped the outside of the moon while it was cooling, and it froze in that warped shape,” Garrick-Bethell told the Agence France-Presse.

Of course this does not explain things for the idiots who push the flat earth mantra, you know the one I am speaking of.

Update on those holes in Siberia: Mysterious Holes In Siberia May Actually Be Odd Type Of Sinkhole

(Have I posted these already?)

This One Tree Grows 40 Different Types Of Fruit, Is Probably From The Future

o-TREE-900

A few crazy news stories from around the US:

Prosecutors Won’t Charge Florida Man For Fatal Gunfire Outside Wal-Mart, Citing Stand Your Ground | ThinkProgress

Wall Street Analysts Predict The Slow Demise Of Walmart And Target

Lawyer Banned From Representing Female Clients Ever Again

Actual grievance decision here: Litchfield Judicial District Grievance Panel v. Mayo – No. 08-0767 – 08-0767.pdf

Obama on Iraq: ‘This is going to be a long-term project’ | Washington Watch | McClatchy DC

Watch a Giraffe Give Birth! Live!

Live cam here: EarthCam – Giraffe Cam

On to some funny things…Madonna in Cannes | Tom & Lorenzo Fabulous & Opinionated

Yah, the queens are making fun of Madonna.

JESUS TAKE THE WHEEL, when did Madonna turn 85 years old? When did she turn into Edina Monsoon? EXISTENTIAL CRISIS PENDING.

More at that link to TLo.

Another one because, well…you will see: Jon Hamm for GQ UK Magazine | Tom & Lorenzo Fabulous & Opinionated

Pretty:

Jon-Hamm-GQ-UK-September-2014-Issue-Tom-Lorenzo-Site-TLO-1

Nice.

Which is a good segue into this latest video from Funny or Die: Putting Joan Holloway In A Modern Office Says A Lot About Income Inequality

If you think Christina Hendricks’ character Joan Holloway would be a ridiculous throwback in today’s office environment, try women still making 23 percent less than their male counterparts.

Funny or Die teamed up with the “Mad Men” actress for this hilariously scathing critique of income inequality that’s certain to get people talking. After all, if workplace policies are going to be straight out of the ’60s, then our clothes, technology and smoking habits might as well be, too.

More eye candy and some interesting reading:

Paris Review – The Professor and the Siren, Marina Warner

The Professor and the Siren

August 9, 2014 | by

Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s groundbreaking mermaid.

the-mermaid

By the side of the path around the circular, volcanic crater of Lake Pergusa, near the town of Enna in the center of Sicily, a carved stone marks the spot where Proserpina, the goddess of the spring, was seized and carried off by Pluto into the underworld. “Qui, in questo luogo,” proclaims the inscription. “Proserpina fù rapita.” This is the very place:

                                          …that fair field
Of Enna, where Proserpin gath’ring flow’rs
Herself a fairer Flow’r by gloomy Dis
Was gather’d, which cost Ceres all that pain
To seek her through the world.
(Milton, Paradise Lost, IV)

And even more eye candy:  10 Ballet Photos That Prove Dancing Is The Magical Alternative To Walking

Maybe not “candy” but still damn interesting: 10 Rare Color Photographs From World War I | Co.Design | business + design

This is just cool as hell: Is an origami robot uprising unfolding? (+video) – CSMonitor.com

And finally, a last link about a new movie….Home Movies: Robert Altman, Hollywood Renegade | TIME

Have a good day, it’s an open thread.