Tuesday Reads

Matisse1

Good Morning!!

I hope everyone is keeping warm this morning, as the deep freeze continues across most of the U.S. We’re expecting a little more snow this afternoon and evening, as winter storm Dion moves up the east coast. We’re fortunately that New England has suffered very little from this storm. Not too far south of us, it’s a wintry mess.

Weather Underground has the details

Winter Storm Dion is not done with the East Coast yet. It’s delivering a parting shot of quick, heavy snow that will blanket the entire I-95 corridor Tuesday morning, snarling traffic and flights as snow falls at the rate of 1-2 inches an hour.

“Dion is barreling in like a freight train,” said The Weather Channel’s winter weather expert Tom Niziol. “The snow is going to come down so heavily. We’re looking at very quick accumulations of 3-5 inches of snow. It’s going to overwhelm the streets and make a rough commute.”

The federal government is closed for a second day for non-emergency workers. Other employees are expected to telecommute Tuesday. All Washington D.C. area schools are closed as well.

“It’s been 1,048 days since Reagan National Airport had a 2 inch snowfall, but that could change Tuesday morning,” said The Weather Channel meteorologist Mike Seidel, reporting from Leesburg, Va.

1,650 flights were canceled nationwide Monday. Hundreds more flights are already canceled Tuesday morning.

“The good news is it’s a very quick storm,” said Niziol. “Conditions are already deteriorating Tuesday morning in Washington D.C. Philadelphia is after that.  By about 10 a.m. Tuesday morning the entire I-95 corridor is covered by falling snow. By mid-afternoon the Northeast will improve and by the evening commute, Dion will be past Boston.”

Read the rest for the “state-by-state impacts.”

kandinsky winter2

In Nevada, a couple and four children are missing after they went to “play in the snow” in the mountains. From the NY Daily News: 

Rescue teams are scouring the Seven Troughs mountain range for James Glanton, Christina MacIntee, their two children, a niece and a nephew after the six went to go “play in the snow” in the remo[t]e northwest region, authorities told NBC News.

The family was reported missing late Sunday night and police are racing against time as temperatures dip far below the freezing level, according to reports.

“The temperatures out here are very cold. We would like to bring a successful end to this,” Pershing County Sheriff Richard Machado told KTVN. “We would like to find them as soon as we can.”

The six were last seen in a silver Jeep cruising at a mining area roughly 20 miles from their home.

Driving into the mountains in the middle of a snowstorm is definitely not a good idea. I just hope these people can be found alive.

Fox News:

Rescue teams racing against the clock and the bitter cold worked into the night and were hoping to resume an aerial search Tuesday for a couple and four children who have been missing since Sunday when they went to play in the snow in the remote mountains of northwest Nevada.

“It’s got to be brutal out there,” said Mark Turney, a spokesman for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. “Let’s hope they are found quick.”

The temperature was expected to drop below zero again Tuesday after plunging to minus-16 degrees the day before in Lovelock, the rugged area where the group was believed to be, about 100 miles northeast of Reno….

The family has not had any communication with others since they went missing, according to Sheila Reitz of the sheriff’s office.

They went to the Seven Troughs area on isolated federal land about noon on Sunday in a silver Jeep with a black top, authorities said. It was unclear what supplies they might have been carrying.

“I’m hoping they all huddled together and stayed in the Jeep,” said Nevada Highway Patrol Trooper Chuck Allen, who added that the area has spotty cellular coverage. “That would be a best-case scenario.”

I have a bad feeling about this–but there’s always hope. I really really hope there will be a happy ending to this story.

vasily_kandinsky-winterlandscape

When I woke up early this morning, NPR was broadcasting live from the funeral of Nelson Mandela in South Africa. Here’s a link to the NPR live blog of the events. The BBC reports on President Obama’s speech:

Mr Obama delivered his address to huge cheers. He said: “It is hard to eulogise any man… how much harder to do so for a giant of history, who moved a nation towards justice.”

He spoke of how the example of Nelson Mandela had “set me on an improbable journey that finds me here today”.

Mr Obama said: “We will never see the likes of Nelson Mandela again. While I will always fall short of Madiba (Mr Mandela’s clan name), he makes me want to be a better man.”

NPR reported there were also enthusiastic cheers for Bill, Hillary, and Chelsea Clinton.

Washington Post: South Africans, world leaders gather to mourn former president Nelson Mandela.

SOWETO, South Africa —Nelson Mandela was memorialized in a boisterous stadium ceremony here Tuesday as a teacher and a racial healer, a transcendent figure who changed history and touched hearts in his native country and around the world.

Scores of thousands of South Africans braved a pouring rain to join dozens of world leaders, including President Obama and many other heads of state, for a four-hour service filled with emotional tributes and joyous song.

“It took a man like Madiba to free not just the prisoner, but the jailor as well; to show that you must trust others so that they may trust you,” Obama said, using the Xhosa tribal name that Mandela preferred. “He changed laws, but also hearts.”

South Africans from all walks of life, businesspeople to nurses to the unemployed, danced and clapped and sang in the hours leading up to the memorial service, their voices echoing across the stadium as if they were cheering at a soccer match. The rich crowded together with the poor, children with the elderly, all there to remember Mandela, the former South African president and African National Congress leader who died Thursday at the age of 95.

winterlandscape kids

The anniversary of the Newtown, CT massacre is this Saturday, Dec. 14, but the town has decided against holding a public memorial.

Residents of Newtown, Conn., have decided against a public commemoration to mark the first anniversary this coming Saturday of the shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School, which left 20 first graders and six educators dead.

Instead, the town is endorsing a “year of service” and is asking residents to put a candle in their window on Dec. 14, the day of the shooting, to show their commitment to the idea of service to each other.

Newtown families have also announced the creation of the website “My Sandy Hook Family,” where people can post their remembrances.

Newtown resident and psychiatrist John Woodall is an expert on resilience and a member of the committee that decided not to hold a town-wide event for the anniversary. He speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the decision.

You can listen to the interview at the “Here and Now” link.

Mother Jones: At Least 194 Children Have Been Shot to Death Since Newtown.

A year after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Mother Jones has analyzed the subsequent deaths of 194 children ages 12 and under who were reported in news accounts to have died in gun accidents, homicides, and suicides. They are spread across 43 states, from inner cities to tiny rural towns.

Following Sandy Hook, the National Rifle Association and its allies argued that arming more adults is the solution to protecting children, be it from deranged mass shooters or from home invaders. But the data we collected stands as a stark rejoinder to that view:

  • 127 of the children died from gunshots in their own homes, while dozens more died in the homes of friends, neighbors, and relatives.
  • 72 of the young victims either pulled the trigger themselves or were shot dead by another kid.
  • In those 72 cases, only 4 adults have been held criminally liable.
  • At least 52 deaths involved a child handling a gun left unsecured.

Additional findings include:

  • 60 children died at the hands of their own parents, 50 of them in homicides.
  • The average age of the victims was 6 years old.
  • More than two-thirds of the victims were boys, as were more than three-quarters of the kids who pulled the trigger.
  • The problem was worst over the past year in the South, which saw at least 92 child gun deaths, followed by the Midwest (44), the West (38), and the East (20).

Our investigation drew on hundreds of local and national news reports. In some cases specific details remain unclear—often these tragedies are just a blip on the media’s radar.

winterlandscape picasso

This has turned out to be a sad post, although I didn’t plan it that way. I’ll end with something interesting and not sad. A group of British scientists has analyzed the environments described in Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings as “an exercise in how climate models work” and to demonstrate their validity. From the University Herald:  ‘Lord Of The Rings’ Landscapes Analyzed And Compared To Real Places In British Study.

Scientists at Britain’s Bristol University compared the climates of famous “Lord of the Rings” sites such as Mordor and The Shire to regions of the world, the San Jose Mercury News reported. They also generated computer simulations of various middle earth landscapes based on information given in the book (notorious for their vast amount of details not always directly related to the plot).

For example, Los Angeles, western Texas, and Alice Springs in Australia have climates closest to Mordor, the site of Sauron’s fortress.

As a whole, however, “the climate of Middle Earth has a similar distribution to that of Western Europe and North Africa,” according to the researchers, one of whom identified himself as Radagast the Brown after the wizard who lives among J.R.R. Tokien’s fictional nature.

The above finding isn’t too surprising, given that Tolkein was from England. His landscapes either resembled the places he knew best or the place he likely found most exotic (Africa). The Shire, home to hobbits Frodo and Bilbo Baggins, could have easily stood for Lincolnshire or Liecestershire, as researchers found environmental similarities between all three, according to the press release.

I’ll end there and turn the floor over to you. What stories are you focusing on today? Please post your links in the comment thread–and have a great day!

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22 Comments on “Tuesday Reads”

  1. Pat Johnson says:

    It’s snowing here already in Western MA. Ugh!!

    Got to run to the drugstore to pick up a prescription before it piles up too high.

    Hard to believe that only a matter of weeks ago I was moaning about the humidity. Now this.

  2. bostonboomer says:

    Bloomberg: GM Bailout Ends as U.S. Sells Last of ‘Government Motors’

    http://www.businessweek.com/news/2013-12-09/gm-bailout-ends-as-u-dot-s-dot-sells-last-share-of-government-motors

  3. Fannie says:

    I know the area where the couple with children are lost in a snow storm. Roughly it’s a desert, southeast of Cedarville, Ca. It is roughly in the same area as the couple, Jim and Jennifer Stopla who became lost in the early 1990’s……..a movie was made about them “snowbound”. They had a baby with them. I am thinking they must have come out of Reno to I80 to get to the mountain range, but could be wrong…………there are hundreds of dirt roads in this area, and people can find themselves lost in snow, or lost period, regardless of time of year.

    I just read it was 10 below………and if they didn’t have a full tank gas, extra food, water, blankets, things can turn really bad quick, especially with children. I hope they find them today.

  4. Fannie says:

    135.8 degrees below zero, coldest ever recorded for antarctica

  5. dakinikat says:

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-12-10/how-did-the-1-percent-get-ahead-so-fast-.html

    During the recovery — from 2009 to 2012 — members of the top 1 percent have enjoyed a big boost in their average income: 31.4 percent. As Saez shows, this figure almost wiped out the loss from the recession, returning the top 1 percent to essentially where it was in 2007.

    By contrast, the remaining 99 percent saw measly growth of 0.4 percent, about a 30th of the 11.6 percent loss they experienced in the recession. By the end of 2012, the bottom 99 percent wasn’t close to where it was in 2007.

    whoa

    • RalphB says:

      I would love to know how much changes in tax policy made that inequality possible. There were some big changes made after the Eisenhower years starting with Kennedy’s tax cut. One other thing which has happened since then is corporate taxes used to be more than personal income taxes and that’s flip flopped completely.

  6. dakinikat says:

    This is pretty odd. The state of Louisiana is throwing people off Medicaid and sending them to Healthcare.gov

    • RalphB says:

      I’m reasonably sure Texas will do the same and then try putting an extra obstacle or so in their way of getting back on Medicaid, hoping some will give up without coverage. The sad part is it will probably work for a percentage of people.

  7. dakinikat says:

    Charles Johnson ‏@Green_Footballs 5m
    Cue Giant Right Wing Freakout: Obama, Cuba’s Raul Castro Shake Hands at Mandela Memorial http://lgf.bz/INYFaM

  8. dakinikat says:

    Christopher Hayes ‏@chrislhayes 7s
    Nothing classier than an oppo dump on homeless kids: http://nypost.com/2013/12/09/the-new-york-times-homeless-hooey/