Late Evening Reads: After the Frenzy

Oh boy, it is late…well then, good later evening!

Today I was cooking those 7 pounds of meatballs, and while I was cooking I got to see three full length movies…funny that is usually how I gauge time while I am in the kitchen. So, I saw Salt, Lone Star State of Mind and Marigold…talk about three movies that could be so different for each other.

Here are tonight’s reads, I will start with the big news that has got a lot of attention. The Mega Million’s Jackpot.

Illinois is selling lottery tickets online, people in California are waiting in line to buy their tickets…and like my family today, when those meatballs were done and the feeding frenzy began…all around the nation, folks are putting their dollar down and hoping that ticket brings them a big payout.

Mega Millions: $540-million jackpot fever sweeps California –

Mega Millions lines

The borrowed pickup truck, a crack inching its way across the windshield, lumbered into the parking lot off Sunset Boulevard a little before noon Thursday. Diana Delmuro parked illegally, grabbed her purse and dashed inside Silversun Liquor. She slapped a crinkled dollar bill on the counter.

“Mega!” she said with a broad smile. “And make it a lucky one.”

Record Mega Millions jackpot sets off ticket-buying frenzy –

Sierra Luchien, left, and Tammy Redlen celebrate as they walk into the Bluebird Liquor store in Hawthorne, Calif., after waiting in line for nearly three hours to purchase their Mega Millions lottery ticket.

Getty Images

Sierra Luchien, left, and Tammy Redlen celebrate as they walk into the Bluebird Liquor store in Hawthorne, Calif., after waiting in line for nearly three hours to purchase their Mega Millions lottery ticket.

With a world record $540 million (and growing) jackpot at stake, much of the nation is gripped by Mega Millions fever.

Millions of lottery tickets are being snapped up ahead of Friday night’s Mega Millions drawing, which could provide a lucky ticket holder with a lump-sum payoff of about $390 million.

From Vermont to Louisiana and New York to California, the jackpot has been the wistful talk of TV, social media sites, office water coolers and dreamy high rollers for the past week, electrifying ticket sales with a frenzy likely to amp up even further ahead of Friday night’s drawing at 11 p.m. ET.

I have to say, I really love that picture of those women dancing with their tickets.

Illinois sells lottery online as jackpot soars –

…Illinois picked the right week to become the first state in the nation to sell lottery tickets online. Others are watching closely to see if the new approach pays off and whether the state takes the next big step: launching online poker, blackjack and other casino games.

It took only three minutes for the first online lottery ticket to sell once the system went live at 7 a.m. Sunday. By Thursday evening, more than $425,000 worth of tickets had been sold online, and officials expected sales to increase by the hour as people take their shot at Friday night’s record prize.

Internet sales on Thursday alone amounted to just more than $64,000 by evening, while the day’s retail sales topped $3.2 million.

Alright, any of you folks buy the winning ticket…just keep the Sky Dancers in the back of your mind. I am sure each of us would be happy with a little token. I’ve already got my agreement with Fannie, one of our readers…Krispy Kreme donuts, for at least a year…if not for life. I wonder what the other front pagers would like if one of our readers won. See, I am pessimistic enough not to think in terms of, if I won a half a billion dollars…my luck would not permit that. But to think that perhaps someone I know would win it, that is a different story.

Moving on, MSNBC is leading its world news tonight with this story:

Child witnesses to Afghan massacre say Robert Bales was not alone

Here are two versions of what happened the night of March 11, when 17 Afghan villagers were shot to death.

First, the Army version: Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, troubled by marriage woes, drunkenly left Camp Belambai, 12 miles from Kandahar, with a pistol and an automatic rifle and killed six people as they slept. Bales then returned to the base and left again for another village, this time killing 11. He acted alone and he admitted to the killings, according to the Army.

Then there is the account that child witnesses provided Yalda Hakim, a journalist for SBS Dateline in Australia. Hakim, who was born in Afghanistan and immigrated to Australia as a child, is the first international journalist to interview the surviving witnesses. She said American investigators tried to prevent her from interviewing the children, saying her questions could traumatize them. She said she appealed to village leaders, who arranged for her to interview the witnesses.

Dateline video at the link.

This next link is something I would like our resident Ph.D. Boston Boomer to chime in on: Man who evaluated alleged Sandusky victim in 1998 was not psychologist

After State College psychologist Alycia Chambers talked to an 11-year-old boy about Jerry Sandusky showering with him in May 1998, she concluded Sandusky was exhibiting signs of grooming the boy for sexual abuse.

A couple days later, a counselor, John Seasock, met with the boy and had a different conclusion. The showering episode, Seasock determined, was rather the result of a routine that coaches like Sandusky do after a workout.

Centre County prosecutors did not pursue criminal charges against Sandusky after that incident, and whether the competing conclusions factored into that decision remains a subject of conjecture.

But, almost 14 years later, the fact that Seasock wasn’t a psychologist at the time, according to state records, raises questions about how much weight his opinion should have carried.

“To take that person’s word over a psychologist who has been prepared and licensed by the state is, I would say, very surprising and a serious concern,” said Marolyn Morford, a State College psychologist.

Morford said Tuesday she’s been alarmed by Seasock’s representation as a psychologist at the time in question. That’s how the Penn State police investigation report refers to him, and that’s how Seasock has been referred to in media reports after the document was leaked Saturday.

State records show that Seasock has been licensed as a professional counselor since January 2002. Prior to 1998, counselors didn’t need to be registered, and after a law passed that year, Seasock had four years to apply to the state for a license.

Hmmm…interesting, yes?

Meanwhile in other Fukushima’d up news…Remember that phrase from last year, playing on the words “fucked up,” as in a term of endearment…just like the phrase Fukushima Goons…

Still critical: radiation levels at Fukushima can kill in minutes –  I tried to find an article in the Japanese press, but could not. Even though this article here cites a post from NHK.

 A lethal level of radiation has been detected inside one of the reactors at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, throwing fresh doubts over the operator’s claims that the disabled complex is under control.

Engineers for Tokyo Electric Power Co (Tepco) say readings of airborne radiation inside the containment vessel of Reactor 2 showed nearly 73 sieverts per hour this week, the highest since the crisis began following the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March last year. Exposure to radiation at that level is deadly within minutes, according to Japan’s public broadcaster, NHK.

Tepco said the find would have “no impact” on the company’s long-term plans to decommission the plant’s six reactors. “We were not surprised that the radiation was this high because the reading was taken from inside the pressure vessel,”a spokesperson said.

I don’t believe a word that TEPCO says, do you? You can read the rest of the story at the link.

And lastly, I caught this story earlier today and it actually made me scratch my head and wonder, what year is this?

Vote: Is it time for Augusta to get first female member?

If there is a drumbeat to admit the first woman to Augusta National, but officials don’t hear it, does it make a sound?

The home of the Masters has found itself back in the speculation business with questions of whether IBM CEO Virginia “Ginni” Rometty will be offered a membership.

Tradition has been that the CEOs of Exxon, AT&T and IBM — the three Masters sponsors — get a membership. But this is the first a time a woman has held that position.

USA TODAY columnist Christine Brennan thinks it is time that a woman walks through the gates as a member.

CHRISTINE BRENNAN:  Columnist says it is time for a female member at Augusta

(It is)…one of the most majestic and beautiful sports venues on earth, and it hosts one of the world’s great sporting events, the Masters. But at its core, it’s a place where change comes by the century, not the year or decade, which is exactly as Augusta’s leaders want it.

At least that’s the way it used to be.

Others disagree saying Augusta is a private club and should make whatever membership rules it prefers.

Say what? There are no…repeat no, female members of this private club? What the hell is it with these people…aren’t there women who are also part of the 1%?

What do you think about all that? Comments are below, get busy!


16 Comments on “Late Evening Reads: After the Frenzy”

  1. Minkoff Minx says:

    I’m running late, as usual…

    • Minkoff Minx says:

      Oh, I wanted to share this link with you, it is funny…Ecstatic cows let out to pasture | Culture: the word on cheese

      We’ve seen it before when cows are let out after a long winter in the barn, but this video is particularly joyful. These cows are psyched!

      With so much attention we’ve been giving the babies, it’s good to see the mommies have a little fun, too!

      video at the link.

      • Minkoff Minx says:

        See those bouncing utters…I can just picture a group of bulls along the side of the fence, all standing on their hind legs like men, chewing on their hay…making the typical remarks you would here from a bunch of guys gawking at women in bikinis jumping on trampolines.

  2. kitchenmudge says:

    Officer Friendly here. We got a report of a there/their violation at the beginning of the fourth paragraph.

  3. RalphB says:

    This is also something. Treatment successful but patient dies.

    Woman arrested for trespassing at hospital dies in jail

    A woman who was suspect of abusing drugs and arrested for refusing to leave a hospital died of a blood clot shortly after being put in jail, according to St. Louis Today.

    Anna Brown, a 29-year-old homeless African American woman, had gone to St. Mary’s Health Center in Richmond Heights, Missouri complaining of leg pain after spraining her ankle. Doctors performed an x-ray of her knees and an ultrasound, but detected no blood clots. She was given pain medication and discharged.

    About eight hours later she returned to the hospital by ambulance complaining of abdominal pain. The hospital told her she had already been treated and discharged her again, but Brown refused to leave. When police officers arrived on another call, the hospital told them that Brown was claiming she “did not receive adequate medical attention and did not have to leave.”
    […]
    St. Mary’s Health Center has denied any wrongdoing.

    “Our records show that, in this case, everything that should have been done medically was done properly. We found nothing that would have changed this tragic outcome,” according to a statement.

  4. janicen says:

    Went out for sushi and on the way home hubby and I stopped to pick up 10 easy picks for the Mega millions. We never buy lottery tickets. We always say, “The lottery is a tax on people who are bad at math”, but we did it. Then all the way home we talked about the people we would help with our winnings. We’d start with friends and family, and then we’d try to track down (who knows how we’d do it, but it was our fantasy) people who were on the verge of losing their homes to foreclosure and pay off their homes for them. Then we’d help people who live on reservations by improving their schools and living conditions. Oh yeah, and we promised another customer in the convenience store 40 million because my husband almost cut in front of him. Even if it is a tax on people who are bad at math, we had fun imagining all the good we could do with our winnings. It was worth the ten bucks!

  5. peggysue22 says:

    Funny you should ask, Minx. My husband asked the same thing: what would you do if you won the lottery?? That was before he told me he picked up a ticket. Would you give any to the kids? he asked. Of course. Spread it around, do some good. But a half a billion dollars is frankly too hard to even contemplate.

    Love the picture of the dancing women. After standing in line for 3 hours, they’re probably dancing because they’re free to sit down.

  6. NW Luna says:

    My statistics textbook was liberally illustrated by gambling story problems. Yeah, somebody always wins, but the odds are poor.

    The odds are better to win something with few ticket buyers — exactly the opposite of what happens when a Megaprize is offered. I’ve never bought a lottery ticket. I refuse to speculate in my head because that would trigger envy and want in me, and I’d rather not. But other people can have fun with it without spending money that should go to the basics.

  7. joanelle says:

    I just heard on the radio while driving home that it’s now up to $640 million – yikes!